1 March 1974

albert-hammond-the-peacemaker-epic-3

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 11 The Peacemaker  - Albert Hammond
2 7 5 If You Need Me  - After All
3 3 10 Ring, Ring  - Abba
4 4 6 Little Jimmy  - Gwynneth Ashley-Robin
5 8 5 Charly  - Sean Rennie
6 2 10 Photograph  - Ringo Starr
7 5 12 The Wonder Of Your Love  - Jody Wayne
8 11 4 Dyna-Mite  - Mud
9 13 4 I Shall Sing  - Art Garfunkel
10 9 8 The Tips Of My Fingers  - Peter Vee
11 6 14 Sorrow  - David Bowie
12 10 7 Nutbush City Limits  - Ike And Tina Turner
13 16 3 Love’s Theme  - Love Unlimited Orchestra
14 18 3 Paper Roses  - Marie Osmond
15 12 19 My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man  - Johnny Gibson
16 20 2 Miss Eva Goodnight  - Crocodile Harris
17 15 7 Goodbye Yellow Brick Road  - Elton John
18 New 1 Give Me Back My Woman  - Alan Garrity
19 14 16 Angie  - Rolling Stones
20 New 1 If Teardrops Were Pennies  - Dolly Parton & Porter Wagoner

‘The Peacemaker’ clocked up another week at the top, bringing its total there to 6. We had now experienced a record breaking run with a solo male artist at the number 1 spot as the last 18 weeks had been testosterone filled chart toppers – 6 with ‘The Peacemaker’, 5 with David Bowie’s ‘Sorrow’ and 7 by Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’.

This would prove to be the best ever run that the men could put together. The female record to date was 8 weeks when Lauren Copley’s ‘Kentucky Blues’ followed Shirley Bassey’s ‘Never Never Never’ 4 week run at the top with another 4 week run. The best run to date by Groups was 17 weeks when a 3 week run by Three Dog Night’s ‘Top Of The World’ was followed by 6 weeks with The Sweet’s ‘Funny Funny’ and then a further 8 weeks from The Sweet, but this time with ‘Co-Co’.

We had a new number 2 as Ringo Starr’s ‘Photograph’ followed the 3 previous songs to spend 5 straight weeks in second place and did not make it to number 1. It dropped to 6 while After All’s ‘If You Need Me’ was the biggest mover up, climbing 5 places to take over the number 2 spot.

The Rolling Stones’ ‘Angie’ was the biggest dropper for the second week running as it fell 5 places from 14 to 19. It was kept company by David Bowie’s ‘Sorrow’ which fell 5 from 6 to 11.

Johnny Gibson’s ‘My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man’ was still the oldest song on the chart as it moved on to 19 weeks in the top 20.

We lost 2 songs from the top 20 this week, Billy Forrest’s ‘Liefde Is My Nooi Se Naam’ which spent 3 weeks on the charts and peaked at 19. In terms of peak position, only Mynie & Jan’s ‘Ek Verlang Nog Altyd’ fared worse for an Afrikaans hit as it did not get higher than number 20 in its 1 week on the chart. But in terms of weeks, Forrest’s hit did manage to outdo not only Mynie & Jan’s hit, but also Roy Memphis’ ‘Maar In Amerika’ which also only spent a single week on the chart at 17.

David Cassidy’s ‘Daydreamer’ (the other song to depart) had spent 14 weeks with us and peaked at 3. Songwriter in this case, Terry Dempsey had had a hand writing 3 number 1’s and 2 number 2’s so far, but this was his first song that peaked at 3.

Alan Garrity clocked up his 5th hit as ‘Give Me Back My Woman’ entered the charts at 18. This was Garrity’s 3rd hit where he was the songwriter. He now joined Jody Wayne, The Dealians and Barbara Ray as local acts on 5 hits and only 3 other local artists had managed better.

The second new entry was the 12th song by a ‘collaboration’ act (these are duets and songs were 2 established groups join forces e.g. The Four Tops and The Supremes collaboration on the 1971 hit ‘River Deep, Mountain High’). The new entry was Dolly Parton’s duet with Porter Wagoner, ‘If Teardrops Were Pennies’. The song was a cover of a 1951 hit by Carl Smith (and written by Carl Butler) which reached number 8 in the US. The song was also covered by Loretta Lynn and Rosemary Clooney. Parton & Wagoner’s version made number 3 on the US Country Songs chart.

Youtube playlist:

22 February 1974

albert-hammond-the-peacemaker-epic-3

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 10 The Peacemaker  - Albert Hammond
2 2 9 Photograph  - Ringo Starr
3 5 9 Ring, Ring  - Abba
4 7 5 Little Jimmy  - Gwynneth Ashley-Robin
5 4 11 The Wonder Of Your Love  - Jody Wayne
6 3 13 Sorrow  - David Bowie
7 6 4 If You Need Me  - After All
8 11 4 Charly  - Sean Rennie
9 8 7 The Tips Of My Fingers  - Peter Vee
10 13 6 Nutbush City Limits  - Ike And Tina Turner
11 15 3 Dyna-Mite  - Mud
12 10 18 My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man  - Johnny Gibson
13 17 3 I Shall Sing  - Art Garfunkel
14 9 15 Angie  - Rolling Stones
15 12 6 Goodbye Yellow Brick Road  - Elton John
16 19 2 Love’s Theme  - Love Unlimited Orchestra
17 14 14 Daydreamer  - David Cassidy
18 18 2 Paper Roses  - Marie Osmond
19 20 3 Liefde Is My Nooi Se Naam  - Billy Forrest
20 New 1 Miss Eva Goodnight  - Crocodile Harris

Albert Hammond was clocking up the weeks at 1 as ‘The Peacemaker’ spent its 5th at the top. Only 10 songs had managed more than 5 weeks to date. Ringo Starr’s ‘Photograph’ became the 4th song to spent 5 weeks in a row at number 2 which equalled the record to date. So far no song spending 5 weeks in a row at 2 had gone on to take the top honours.

Two songs managed a climb of 4 places which was the biggest move up this week. Mud’s ‘Dyna-mite’ and Art Garfunkel’s ‘I Shall Sing’ were debut songs for both acts and this was their first time as biggest movers up, however only Garfunkel would go on to have another one.

On the falling front it was The Rolling Stones’ ‘Angie’ which fell the most, dropping 5 places from 9 to 14. The song was their 3rd hit and the first to gain the biggest faller in a week title, but given that their 2 previous hits had both only spent 1 week in the chart, they were hardly likely to have gained this honour with them.

The Stones had spent at least one week in the charts every year from 1971 to 1974. The only other act on this week’s chart that could boast this sort of run was Billy Forrest who had also charted in 1969, but missed out on 1970 to have a perfect record on this front.

Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ departed from the chart this week after spending 20 weeks on it, of which 7 were spent at the number 1 spot. This would be Overstreet’s only hit. To date 2 other acts who would only have 1 hit had managed to get to 20 weeks with it and 4 had managed to have more than 20 weeks with Don Gibson’s ‘Woman (Beautiful Woman)’ leading the way with 27 weeks for a single hit act.

The exit of ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ made way for a new oldest song on the chart and it was Johnny Gibson’s ‘My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man’ that took over. This was the 21st local song to be the oldest song on the charts.

There was just the one new entry this week in the shape of Crocodile Harris’ ‘Miss Eva Goodnight’. Had the song been released more recent times the artist would probably have been noted as ‘Crocodile Harris featuring McCully Workshop’ as that notable band played on the single which was written by Mike and Tully McCully. Crocodile Harris’ real name is Robin Graham and he hails from Somerset West.

Youtube playlist:

15 February 1974

albert-hammond-the-peacemaker-epic-3

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 9 The Peacemaker  - Albert Hammond
2 2 8 Photograph  - Ringo Starr
3 3 12 Sorrow  - David Bowie
4 4 10 The Wonder Of Your Love  - Jody Wayne
5 5 8 Ring, Ring  - Abba
6 15 3 If You Need Me  - After All
7 9 4 Little Jimmy  - Gwynneth Ashley-Robin
8 8 6 The Tips Of My Fingers  - Peter Vee
9 6 14 Angie  - Rolling Stones
10 11 17 My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man  - Johnny Gibson
11 14 3 Charly  - Sean Rennie
12 7 5 Goodbye Yellow Brick Road  - Elton John
13 10 5 Nutbush City Limits  - Ike And Tina Turner
14 12 13 Daydreamer  - David Cassidy
15 18 2 Dyna-Mite  - Mud
16 13 20 Heaven Is My Womans Love  - Tommy Overstreet
17 17 2 I Shall Sing  - Art Garfunkel
18 New 1 Paper Roses  - Marie Osmond
19 New 1 Love’s Theme  - Love Unlimited Orchestra
20 20 2 Liefde Is My Nooi Se Naam  - Billy Forrest

‘The Peacemaker’ by Albert Hammond was our number 1 for the 4th week in a row while Ringo Starr waited at number 2, for a 4th week, hoping to join John Lennon who was to date the only ex-Beatle to grab the top spot in SA. At number 3, David Bowie’s ‘Sorrow’ became the first song to spend 4 straight weeks that spot.

The number 4 and 5 spots were also unchanged, but at number 5 was the biggest climber of the week, After All’s version of ‘If You Need Me’, which jumped 9 places up from 15 to 6. This was the 6th time a Dutch act had obtained this honour with The George Baker Selection accounting for half of them and James Lloyd and The Shuffles making up the other 2 times.

Elton John’s ‘Goodbye Yellow Brick Road’ lost the most ground this week as it slid 5 places to 12. This was his 5th time as the biggest faller. To date he had had 2 five place drops in a week (once with ‘Crocodile Rock’ and once with ‘Daniel’), and would have 7 more as well as a 6 place and 7 place fall.

Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ joined the “20 Club” as it ticked over to 20 weeks on the charts and was the oldest on the top 20. It was the 26th song to date to spend at least this number of weeks on the chart.

We said goodbye to Alan Garrity’s ‘Goodbye Mama’ which had a peak of 15 and spent 7 weeks on the chart, thus making it his worst performer to date with all his previous hits (3 in total) having gone top 10 and spending at least 13 weeks on the chart.

We also said goodbye to ‘My Maria’ by B.W. Stevenson. It had lasted 12 weeks on the charts and peaked at 7. This beat the high of his only other hit, ‘Shambala’, by 2, but fell 2 weeks short of the number of weeks the latter had managed. This gave Stevenson a chart career of 2 hits, 26 weeks and a best peak of 7.

The first of our new entries was the 3rd of the Osmond siblings to chart. We had had 2 hits from Donny and one by Little Jimmy and now we had Maria with ‘Paper Roses’. The song was written by Fred Spielman and Janice Torre and was a number 5 hit in the US and a number 24 hit in the UK for Anita Bryant. Maria’s version gave her a number 5 hit in the US and 2 in the UK as well as topping the country singles charts in the US and Canada.

Joining Marie as a new entry was Love Unlimited Orchestra’s ‘Love’s Theme’. The ‘group’ was a 40 piece orchestra that did backing working for Barry White. ‘Love’s Theme’ was the 20th instrumental hit to chart. It had been 9 month since we last saw an instrumental in the charts (‘Duelling Banjo’s’ by Deliverance). ‘Love’s Theme’ spent the week of 9 February 1974 at number 1 in the US and was one of the few orchestral pieces to manage this. A version with lyrics and vocals was released by Love Unlimited (a female vocal trio backed by the Love Unlimited Orchestra – confusing, I know) in 1974 as well. The orchestral version made number 10 in the UK as well as making 7 in Holland and Belgium and 22 in Germany.

Youtube playlist:

8 February 1974

albert-hammond-the-peacemaker-epic-3

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 The Peacemaker  - Albert Hammond
2 2 7 Photograph  - Ringo Starr
3 3 11 Sorrow  - David Bowie
4 4 9 The Wonder Of Your Love  - Jody Wayne
5 6 7 Ring, Ring  - Abba
6 5 13 Angie  - Rolling Stones
7 7 4 Goodbye Yellow Brick Road  - Elton John
8 10 5 The Tips Of My Fingers  - Peter Vee
9 13 3 Little Jimmy  - Gwynneth Ashley-Robin
10 12 4 Nutbush City Limits  - Ike And Tina Turner
11 8 16 My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man  - Johnny Gibson
12 9 12 Daydreamer  - David Cassidy
13 11 19 Heaven Is My Womans Love  - Tommy Overstreet
14 19 2 Charly  - Sean Rennie
15 18 2 If You Need Me  - After All
16 16 12 My Maria  - B.W. Stevenson
17 New 1 I Shall Sing  - Art Garfunkel
18 New 1 Dyna-Mite  - Mud
19 15 7 Good-Bye Mama  - Alan Garrity
20 New 1 Liefde Is My Nooi Se Naam  - Billy Forrest

For a third week running we had Albert Hammond and his ‘The Peacemaker’ at the top of the charts. Ringo Starr was unmoved at number 2 with ‘Photograph’ while David Bowie at 3 and Jody Wayne at 4 were also not going anywhere.

Sean Rennie’s ‘Charly’ was the one that moved up the most this week as it climbed 5 places from 19 to 14. He was now the 17th local male to have a biggest mover up in the week and this would be the only time he managed this.

To date 3 local males had managed the biggest mover up in a week 4 times. These were Alan Garrity, Dave Mills and Richard Jon Smith, however this week Garrity found himself as the biggest dropper for the 8th time. This was the most times to date that a local act had suffered this fate and only 2 other acts had seen this happen to them more times (11 for The Sweet and 12 for Creedence Clearwater Revival).

Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ ticked over to 19 weeks on the charts and was the oldest on the chart for the 7th week now.

We had 3 songs depart from the chart of which 2 were local. The first was Richard Jon Smith’s worst performing song to date, ‘Sweet Mama’. It lasted only 5 weeks on the chart and peaked at 13, a good way off his previous hit’s performance where ‘That’s Why I Love You’ managed 17 weeks and a peak of 2, but not too far away from his first hit ‘Candlelight’ which spent 9 weeks on the chart and peaked at 11.

Ken J. Larkin was not granted ‘One More Night’ on our charts as the song fell off after a 7 week run and a peak of 14. This ended Larkin’s chart career which had spanned 4 years, 6 months and 14 days, incorporating 4 hits, 32 weeks and a best peak of 5 with ‘Turn Around’.

The Sweet’s ‘The Ballroom Blitz’ was the last song to go. It had lasted 15 weeks on the charts and peaked at 3 and was the best performing of their hits since their first 2 charting songs in SA ’Funny Funny’ and ‘Co Co’ had both topped the charts. Of the 4 songs of theirs that had charted in the interim, the number 7 peak by ‘Blockbuster!’ had been their best performer.

We had already seen 2 hits by Paul Simon since his divorce from Art Garfunkel, but this week we saw the first of Garfunkel’s solo efforts. ‘I Shall Sing’, which entered the charts at 17 was a Van Morrison composition which he recorded, but never released at the time. Eventually a version by him appeared on the expanded deluxe 2013 release of ‘Moondance’. SA’s own Miriam Makeba had already released a version of this back in 1970. Garfunkel’s version would bag him a 38 peak on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US.

One would think that calling your band Mud would probably not attract many fans (except maybe some pigs or hippos), but Les Grey, Rob Davis, Ray Stiles and Dave Mount thought it was a good idea and it was as they scored 15 UK hits, 3 of which went to number 1 there. In South Africa our charts were first muddied by their sounds this week when ‘Dyna-mite’ entered at 18. The song gave songwriters Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn their 9th top 20 hit in SA, placing them tied 6th on the list of number of hits by a songwriter. The song entered the UK charts on 27 October 1973 and reached number 4 during a 12 week run there.

Last of the new entries was the first instance we had of an Afrikaans version of a song that had already charted in English in SA also reaching the top 20. In this case, the English version, ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ sat at number 13 this week while Billy Forrest’s ‘Liefde Is My Nooi Se Naam’ was a new entry at 20. This was the 8th Afrikaans song to chart (the last one being Mynie & Jan’s ‘Ek Verlang Nog Altyd’ back in August 1973). It was also the first hit by Billy Forrest to chart under the name Billy Forrest and was his 9th hit overall (including his recent duet with Angelika Illman as Geli & Billy). This put him 2nd overall on the list of number of hits by an artist (2 behind Creedence Clearwater Revival on 11) and he was 2 clear of Dave Mills who was the next highest local act.

Youtube playlist:

1 February 1974

albert-hammond-the-peacemaker-epic-3

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 The Peacemaker  - Albert Hammond
2 2 6 Photograph  - Ringo Starr
3 3 10 Sorrow  - David Bowie
4 5 8 The Wonder Of Your Love  - Jody Wayne
5 4 12 Angie  - Rolling Stones
6 7 6 Ring, Ring  - Abba
7 10 3 Goodbye Yellow Brick Road  - Elton John
8 6 15 My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man  - Johnny Gibson
9 8 11 Daydreamer  - David Cassidy
10 11 4 The Tips Of My Fingers  - Peter Vee
11 9 18 Heaven Is My Womans Love  - Tommy Overstreet
12 15 3 Nutbush City Limits  - Ike And Tina Turner
13 20 2 Little Jimmy  - Gwynneth Ashley-Robin
14 13 15 The Ballroom Blitz  - Sweet
15 16 6 Good-Bye Mama  - Alan Garrity
16 12 11 My Maria  - B.W. Stevenson
17 14 7 One More Night  - Ken J. Larkin
18 New 1 If You Need Me  - After All
19 New 1 Charly  - Sean Rennie
20 19 5 Sweet Mama  - Richard Jon Smith

Albert Hammond’s ‘The Peacemaker’ hung on to the number 1 position for a second week running which meant we had a new record of 14 straight weeks with a male solo artist at the top of our charts. In fact 14 was the important number for men this week as that was the number of the top 20 songs that were testosterone fuelled. This 14 out of 20 hits being by men equalled the record to date.

‘Little Jimmy’ by Gwynneth Ashley-Robin was the biggest climber this week as it jumped 7 from 20 to 13. Little Jimmy (Osmond), the subject of the song, had managed to be the biggest mover up in a week twice, but had never managed a 7 place leap (his best was 4 places).

B.W. Stevenson had been the biggest faller in a week twice with his hit ‘Shambala’ and now he managed it again with ‘My Maria’ which dropped 4 places from 12 to 16.

The 18 weeks Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ had spent on the charts made it the oldest in the top 20. The Sweet’s ‘Ballroom Blitz’ and Johnny Gibson’s ‘My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man’ on 15 weeks were the second oldest.

We lost 2 local songs this week, the first of which was The Rising Son’s ‘Going Down Jordan’ which had spent 16 weeks on the charts and peaked at 7. To date only Elvis Presley’s ‘Burning Love’ and John Edmond’s ‘Every Day Every Night’ had spent more weeks on the chart and peaked at 7 with those 2 songs spending 17 weeks to get a peak of 7. Overall 4 songs that would peak at 7 would spend more than 16 weeks on the charts, while another 2 would equal Rising Songs 16 weeks. The exit of ‘Going Down Jordan’ from the charts meant that The Rising Sons were finished with the top 20. They had had 4 hits, spent 42 weeks on the charts and had a best peak of 4 (with ‘How Do you Do’).

The second song we said goodbye to was Geli & Billy’s ‘Do You Love Me’ which had been the tied oldest song on the chart last week alongside Tommy Overstreet who was now on 18 weeks. The song had made it to number 2 and spent 17 weeks on the charts. Depending on if you regard Dawn & Tony Orlando as a ‘multi artist’ act (i.e. an act that features more than 1 artist, usually a duet) or not, then Geli & Billy were either 1st or 2nd on the list for highest peak by a ‘multi artist’ song’ Dawn & Tony Orlando’s ‘Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree’ had managed to get to 1 while Geli & Billy managed a number 2.

The first of the new entries was by a band who are very difficult to Google as they named themselves After All. From what I can find out, they were a Dutch band and a guy called Gerrit Trip was the lead singer. Trip spent some time in the band Teach-In who would have a hit in SA in 1975. ‘If You Need Me’ was a cover of a 1963 song written and recorded by Wilson Pickett. Pickett’s version vied for top honours in a US Hot 100 battle with one recorded by Solomon Burke, a battle that Burke won, peaking at 37 compared to Pickett’s 64. The song was also recorded by The Rolling Stones and Tom Jones. Recently After All’s lead singer Gerrit Trip re-recorded the song, which has proved surprisingly popular. This version can be found on Youtube.

The second new entry was Irish born local lad Sean Rennie with his song ‘Charly’ (not a mis-spelt cover of the Rabbitt hit ‘Charlie’ as that hadn’t been written yet). This was Rennie’s second hit, following up his 1970 number 13 hit ‘I’ll Walk With You’. ‘Charly’ was a cover of a song by Spanish band Santabarbara who took the song to number 2 in Switzerland, 5 in Germany, 9 in Holland, 18 in Austria and 22 in Belgium.

Youtube playlist:

25 January 1974

albert-hammond-the-peacemaker-epic-3

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 6 The Peacemaker  - Albert Hammond
2 4 5 Photograph  - Ringo Starr
3 1 9 Sorrow  - David Bowie
4 3 11 Angie  - Rolling Stones
5 5 7 The Wonder Of Your Love  - Jody Wayne
6 7 14 My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man  - Johnny Gibson
7 9 5 Ring, Ring  - Abba
8 6 10 Daydreamer  - David Cassidy
9 8 17 Heaven Is My Womans Love  - Tommy Overstreet
10 17 2 Goodbye Yellow Brick Road  - Elton John
11 12 3 The Tips Of My Fingers  - Peter Vee
12 10 10 My Maria  - B.W. Stevenson
13 11 14 The Ballroom Blitz  - Sweet
14 14 6 One More Night  - Ken J. Larkin
15 18 2 Nutbush City Limits  - Ike And Tina Turner
16 15 5 Good-Bye Mama  - Alan Garrity
17 13 17 Do You Love Me  - Geli & Billy
18 16 16 Going Down Jordan  - Rising Sons
19 19 4 Sweet Mama  - Richard Jon Smith
20 New 1 Little Jimmy  - Gwynneth Ashley-Robin

Albert Hammond scored his first number 1 as either artist or songwriter as ‘The Peacemaker’ ended David Bowie’s 5 week run at the top with ‘Sorrow’. Hammond’s previous hit as artist (‘The Free Electric Band’) had only managed to get to number 11 and his best effort as songwriter occurred when Joe Dolan’s ‘Make Me An Island’ got to number 2. With Bowie’s 5 week run and Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ which had been at the top for 7 weeks before that, this week saw an equalling of the record to date for consecutive week at 1 by a male solo artist (The George Baker Selection was at 1 before Overstreet).

Last week Ringo Starr’s ‘Photograph’ was at the peak position of his previous hit, ‘It Don’t Come Easy’ which had made it to number 4. This week he improved on his best high to date by jumping up 2 places to number 2.

Elton John said goodbye position 17 as he became rocket man, flying 7 places up the charts to number 10. This was his second time being the biggest climber in a week, emulating the success that ‘Daniel’ had had when it climbed 4 places in a week.

Billy Forrest was 8 hits into his SA chart career (adding up all those under different names and including the current duet with Geli) and this was only the 2nd time he would suffer the indignity of being the biggest faller in week as the aforementioned duet with Geli, ‘Do you Love Me’, fell 4 places from 13 to 17. His previous biggest drop had been with a William E. hit, ‘Papa’s Gonna Kiss It Beter’.

Forrest could take some comfort from the fact that his duet was the oldest song on the chart alongside Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ which had both been on the charts for 17 weeks now. This was the 4th week that these 2 had shared the ‘granddaddy’ honours.

2 weeks back we had seen the bottom 9 songs on the chart being local songs. This week wasn’t quite as dramatic, but the bottom 5 were by local acts. There were a total of 9 songs by local acts on the chart this week.

We said goodbye to Jessica Jones’ ‘Waikiki Man’ which had managed an 11 week run with a peak of 13. This would be the last we saw of Jessica on our charts following a career of 3 hits, 48 weeks and 3 weeks at the top of the charts with ‘Sunday, Monday, Tuesday’. She stood 3rd in terms of weeks on the chart by a local solo female artist and 4th out of all the women.

Her place on the charts was taken by another local solo female artist, Gwynneth Ashley-Robin (born Gwynneth Joubert) who was only 13 years old when her song ‘Little Jimmy’ reached our charts. The song was dedicated to a previous youngster who had charted on our charts, Little Jimmy Osmond. Osmond was himself only 10 when he charted. ‘Little Jimmy’ the song was the 3rd one written by Jody Wayne where he was not the artist performing it. Wayne (who’s ‘The Wonder Of Your Love’ was at number 5 this week) also produced the song. Ashley-Robin was tragically killed in a light aircraft accident in 1976 when she was just 15.

Youtube playlist:

18 January 1974

david-bowie-sorrow-rca-victor

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Sorrow  - David Bowie
2 3 5 The Peacemaker  - Albert Hammond
3 2 10 Angie  - Rolling Stones
4 4 4 Photograph  - Ringo Starr
5 8 6 The Wonder Of Your Love  - Jody Wayne
6 7 9 Daydreamer  - David Cassidy
7 6 13 My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man  - Johnny Gibson
8 5 16 Heaven Is My Womans Love  - Tommy Overstreet
9 10 4 Ring, Ring  - Abba
10 9 9 My Maria  - B.W. Stevenson
11 11 13 The Ballroom Blitz  - Sweet
12 18 2 The Tips Of My Fingers  - Peter Vee
13 12 16 Do You Love Me  - Geli & Billy
14 16 5 One More Night  - Ken J. Larkin
15 19 4 Good-Bye Mama  - Alan Garrity
16 15 15 Going Down Jordan  - Rising Sons
17 New 1 Goodbye Yellow Brick Road  - Elton John
18 New 1 Nutbush City Limits  - Ike And Tina Turner
19 13 3 Sweet Mama  - Richard Jon Smith
20 14 11 Waikiki Man  - Jessica Jones

It would be 6 more years before David Bowie would divorce Angela ‘Angie’ Barnett, but Albert Hammond thought he needed to step in between the two of them to be a peacemaker as far back as 1974. This occurred when Bowie’s ‘Sorrow’ spent its 5th week at number 1 and the first of those 5 weeks without the Rolling Stones’ ‘Angie’ at number 2. Despite its title and supposition about which ‘Angie’ the song was about, Mick Jagger denies that it was Angie Bowie, but was rather Keith Richard’s daughter Angela.

Peter Vee’s ‘The Tips Of My Fingers’ was the biggest mover up this week as it climbed 6 places from 18 to 12. This would be the only time he would have the biggest mover up in a week. His previous biggest jump up was 4 places (with ‘Can We Get To That’) but that was beaten that week by a 6 place jump by Barbara Ray’s ‘Silver Threads And Golden Needles’.

This biggest fall this week was 6 places and this was experienced by Richard Jon Smith’s ‘Sweet Mama’ and Jessica Jones’ ‘Waikiki Man’. Neither of these 2 artists were strangers to this fate as they had both experienced it twice before and in both cases they were with different songs.

The age of the oldest songs on the chart was steadily climbing up as Tommy Overstreet and Geli & Billy’s hits moved on to 16 weeks in the top 20. Overstreet would have to make the most of this as ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ would be his only SA hit. The team of Geli & Billy (Angelika Illman and Billy Forrest) would have another hit.

The artists represented this week would account for a total of 127 hits by the time the charts finished in 1989. This would be the 4th highest total number of hits that the artists on a particular week’s chart would have in total. The acts represented here would average 5.8 hits each.

The local count took a knock as the 2 songs that left the charts were by South African acts. Both were replaced by international acts. The first of the leavers was Lorne Shields’ ‘Turn Back The Clock’ which had lasted 6 weeks on the charts and peaked at number 14. This would be the only top 20 hit for Shields. This put him tied 54th on the list of weeks on the chart by a local artist.

Four Jacks & A Jill were not too much further up that list as their only hit between 1969 and 1989, ‘Universal Feeling’ departed after 10 weeks and a peak of 11, leaving them at number 39 on the weeks by a local act list.

The first of the new entries was the title track from Elton John’s ‘Goodbye Yellow Brick Road’. The song was co-written by Elton and Bernie Taupin and was their 3rd hit as a songwriting team. The ‘yellow brick road’ referred to the one that Dorothy in ‘The Wizard Of Oz’ was told to follow. The song topped the Canadian charts as well as the Cashbox charts in the US, but only made it to number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100, the latter generally being acknowledged as the official US charts. In the UK it was his 7th song to chart and joined 5 of the previous 6 in going top 10 there, peaking as it did at 6. It was only 1972’s  ‘Honky Cat’ which missed the top 10, peaking as it did at 31. ‘Goodbye Yellow Brick Road’ marked the end of his UK top 10 hit run and he would not have another one for the next 8 hits, the 9th one after ‘Goodbye…’, ‘Pinball Wizard’ would return him to the top 10 there.

The other new entry was the (then) husband and wife team of Ike & Tina Turner with their hit ‘Nutbush City Limits’. This would be the last song they would record together and it refers to Tina’s hometown of Nutbush, Tennessee. The song topped the charts in Austria, made 2 in Germany and Switzerland, 4 in the UK, 5 in Italy, 18 in Ireland and 22 in the US.

Youtube playlist:

11 January 1974

david-bowie-sorrow-rca-victor

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 Sorrow  - David Bowie
2 2 9 Angie  - Rolling Stones
3 7 4 The Peacemaker  - Albert Hammond
4 10 3 Photograph  - Ringo Starr
5 4 15 Heaven Is My Womans Love  - Tommy Overstreet
6 5 12 My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man  - Johnny Gibson
7 3 8 Daydreamer  - David Cassidy
8 6 5 The Wonder Of Your Love  - Jody Wayne
9 8 8 My Maria  - B.W. Stevenson
10 12 3 Ring, Ring  - Abba
11 11 12 The Ballroom Blitz  - Sweet
12 9 15 Do You Love Me  - Geli & Billy
13 19 2 Sweet Mama  - Richard Jon Smith
14 14 10 Waikiki Man  - Jessica Jones
15 15 14 Going Down Jordan  - Rising Sons
16 20 4 One More Night  - Ken J. Larkin
17 13 10 Universal Feeling  - Four Jacks & A Jill
18 New 1 The Tips Of My Fingers  - Peter Vee
19 16 3 Good-Bye Mama  - Alan Garrity
20 18 6 Turn Back The Clock  - Lorne Shields

‘Sorrow’ and ‘Angie’ remained at 1 and 2 respectively for the 4th week in a row with Albert Hammond’s ‘The Peacemaker’ applying the pressure to break their stranglehold on the top of the charts as the latter climbed 4 places to number 3.

Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ was the only previous number 1 on the charts this week and had been since George Baker Selection’s ‘Baby Blue’ was last seen on the charts 3 weeks back. The previous time when there was only 1 ex-number 1 on the chart was on 23 March 1973 when Lobo’s ‘I’d Love You To Want Me’ was at number 6 and was the only song on the chart that had already made the top spot other than the number 1 that week.

Ringo Starr’s ‘Photograph’ along with Richard Jon Smith’s ‘Sweet Mama’ both climbed 6 places to be the biggest climbers this week. This was the second week running that ‘Photograph’ had claimed this honour and it was only the second song by an ex-Beatle so far to manage the biggest climb twice. Only Paul had now not managed to be the biggest climber in the week (with any song) more than once. For Richard Jon Smith it was his 4th time as biggest climber in a week having managed it with all his charting hits to date (twice with ‘That’s Why I Love You’).

There were 2 songs that shared the honours for biggest drop this week as Four Jacks & A Jill’s ‘Universal Feeling’ and David Cassidy’s ‘Daydreamer’ both fell 4 places to 17 and 7 respectively. For both acts this was their first time with that sinking feeling and only Cassidy would go on to have a biggest faller again.

There was no change in the oldest songs on the charts as both Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ and Geli & Billy’s ‘Do You Love Me’ ticked over to 15 weeks in the top 20. The Rising Sons ‘Going Down Jordan’ had clocked up the second highest number of weeks as it moved on to 14.

The bottom 9 songs this week were all by local acts, but we still had 11 local songs on the charts despite Lance James’ ‘What’s Your Mama’s Name Child’ falling off after a 5 week run and a peak of 17.

The reason for keeping the lekker local level at ‘leven hits (apart from getting some groovy alliteration going) was that the new entry to replace ‘What’s You Mama’s name Child’ was local act Peter Vee with his hit ‘The Tips Of My Fingers’.  This was Vee’s 3rd solo hit (having charted previously as a member of The Outlet) and it followed up his hit from July/August 1973, ‘He (Can Build A Mountain’. ‘The Tips Of My Fingers’ was a cover of a 1960 hit written and performed by Bill Anderson. He took his version to number 7 on the Country Singles charts in the US. 3 years later, Roy Clark took a cover to number 10 on the Country Singles and number 45 on the main Billboard Hot 100 there. Bill Anderson would chart in South Africa in 1975 as part of a duet with Jan Howard.

Youtube playlist:

4 January 1974

david-bowie-sorrow-rca-victor

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Sorrow  - David Bowie
2 2 8 Angie  - Rolling Stones
3 5 7 Daydreamer  - David Cassidy
4 4 14 Heaven Is My Womans Love  - Tommy Overstreet
5 3 11 My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man  - Johnny Gibson
6 8 4 The Wonder Of Your Love  - Jody Wayne
7 10 3 The Peacemaker  - Albert Hammond
8 7 7 My Maria  - B.W. Stevenson
9 6 14 Do You Love Me  - Geli & Billy
10 19 2 Photograph  - Ringo Starr
11 9 11 The Ballroom Blitz  - Sweet
12 16 2 Ring, Ring  - Abba
13 11 9 Universal Feeling  - Four Jacks & A Jill
14 13 9 Waikiki Man  - Jessica Jones
15 12 13 Going Down Jordan  - Rising Sons
16 20 2 Good-Bye Mama  - Alan Garrity
17 17 5 What’s Your Mama’s Name Child  - Lance James
18 14 5 Turn Back The Clock  - Lorne Shields
19 New 1 Sweet Mama  - Richard Jon Smith
20 18 3 One More Night  - Ken J. Larkin

For the 4th year in a row, the number 1 song that ended the previous year was the chart topper in the first week of the new year as David Bowie’s ‘Sorrow’ hung on to its place at the top for a third week in a row. ‘Angie’ by the Rolling Stones, which had been ‘Sorrow’’s number 2 the whole time the latter had been on top, was still lurking a place behind.

Ringo Starr managed the biggest leap to date by an ex-Beatle as ‘Photograph’ jumped 9 places up from 19 to 10. The previous biggest by an ex-Beatle was John Lennon’s ‘Mother’ which climbed 8 in a week. John would be the only other ex-Beatle to manage a leap of 9 places in a week and would do so in 1975. None of the fab four would jump more than 9 places in a week. This was the first time Ringo had been the biggest climber in a week and all 4 of the Beatles had now managed this as solo artists and they accounted for 6 of the biggest climbers in a week to date.

Lorne Shields provided the 33rd occasion when the biggest faller in a week was local as his ‘Turn Back the Clock’ did what it said on the tin and dropped 4 places to number 18 where the song had sat on 14 December 1973, 3 weeks previously.

The oldest songs on the chart were comparatively ‘young’, having only been on the top 20 for 14 weeks. Geli & Billy’s ‘Do you Love Me’ and Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ took over as the oldest on the charts this week following the departure of Tommy Oliver’s ‘I Wanna Live’ (more on that later). The last time we had seen a 14 week or younger song as the oldest on the charts was back in June of 1972 when Neil Reid’s ‘Mother Of Mine’ was just 13 weeks old (Neil himself was just 13 years old when his song charted). Geli & Billy’s ‘Do You Love Me’ was the 20th local song to date to get to be the oldest on the chart.

There were still 11 local songs on the charts, 8 of which made up the bottom 8 positions of the top 20 while Johnny Gibson was the highest placed at number 5 with ‘My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man’.

Tommy Oliver’s ‘I Wanna Live’ fell off the charts after 17 weeks and a peak of 3. This was the 7th of 15 local songs that would end up with a peak of 3.

In the place Tommy Oliver, we had a new entry by a local act which kept the local content of the chart at 11 hits. ‘Sweet Mama’ was Richard Jon Smith’s 3rd hit, following up the success of his number 2 hit, ‘That’s Why I Love You’. As with ‘That’s Why…’, ‘Sweet Mama’ was also penned by Smith himself and both used the production talents of Robert John ‘Mutt’ Lange.

We now had 3 local songs in the chart with the word ‘mama’ in their title (Smith’s ‘Sweet Mama’, Alan Garrity’s ‘Good-bye Mama’ and Lance James’ ‘What’s Your Mama’s Name Child’).

Youtube playlist:

1973 The Facts and Figures

we_believe_breck

We have now gone through 5 years’ worth of charts and it’s time to recap on what happened in 1973 and where things stood for the period from the beginning of 1969 to the end of ’73.

The number of hits to charts in the year continued the trend of falling each year as 1973 saw only 104 different songs make the top 20. This was way down on the 150 we saw in 1969. The steady progression downwards of number of hits is shown as follows:

1969 150
1970 141
1971 134
1972 117
1973 104

The number of different acts charting this year was 85, 12 less than the previous year.

On the local front, we saw 39 songs by South African acts charting which was 10 more than 1972, but fell 2 short of the 1971 total of 41 which was the record to date. 30 acts were responsible for these 39 hits.

TOP HITS

Based on a points system of 20 points for a number 1 position, 19 for number 2 etc down to 1 for position 20, the following are the top 20 chart performers for the year (Note: this does not reflect sales):

Pos Song Artist Points
1 We Believe In Tomorrow Freddy Breck 376
2 Woman (Beautiful Woman) Don Gibson 355
3 I Don’t Wanna Play House Barbara Ray 336
4 Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree Dawn & Tony Orlando 307
5 Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet Maria 302
6 Never Never Never Shirley Bassey 300
7 Can’t Keep It In Cat Stevens 295
8 Kentucky Blues Lauren Copley 285
9 I’d Love You To Want Me Lobo 283
10 The Love In Your Eyes Vicky Leandros 275
11 Baby Blue George Baker Selection 268
12 Take Me To The Mardi Gras Paul Simon 243
13 Heaven Is My Womans Love Tommy Overstreet 229
14 I’m On Fire Maria 226
15 Ashes Of Love Dickey Lee 223
16 That’s Why I Love You Richard Jon Smith 221
17 I Wanna Live Tommy Oliver 210
18 Maori Love Song Double Vision 203
19 The Morning After Maureen Mcgovern 203
20 And I Love You So Perry Como 194

You can compare this to the list published in Top 40 magazine in 1989 which can be found here:

http://www.rock.co.za/files/sahits_1973.html

The cumulative points from the beginning of 1969 to the end of 1973 gave the following top 5:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 I Need Someone Alan Garrity 464
2 I Can See Clearly Now Johnny Nash 448
3 Cry To Me Staccatos 447
4 You Peter Maffay 399
5 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday Jessica Jones 391

The top South African hits of 1973 were:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 I Don’t Wanna Play House Barbara Ray 336
2 Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet Maria 302
3 Kentucky Blues Lauren Copley 285
4 I’m On Fire Maria 226
5 That’s Why I Love You Richard Jon Smith 221

NUMBER OF HITS

The highest number of hits by an artist in 1973 was 3 and 2 acts managed this – Alan Garrity and The Sweet. This was well down on the record 5 in a year which The Archies and The Bee Gees had managed in 1969, Neil Diamond had managed in 1971 and Middle Of The Road managed in 1972. 15 acts managed 2 hits in 1973 and the remaining 68 were all the only hit by those artists in the year.

Alan Garrity’s 3 hits mentioned above was the best for a local act while Barbara Ray, Lauren Copley, Maria, Richard Jon Smith, The Dealians, Letta Mbulu and Jessica Jones all managed 2 hits.

To date, Creedence Clearwater Revival’s 11 hits was still the best by any act, despite the band’s last hit being in 1972. Billy Forrest (highest local act), Neil Diamond, The Archies and Percy Sledge all sat on 8. Dave Mills and John Edmond on 6 hits apiece were the next best locals behind Billy Forrest.

WEEKS ON THE CHARTS

Maria became the 2nd local act to clock up the most weeks on the chart in a year and the first solo female of any nationality to do so as she spent a total of 40 weeks in the charts in 1973 (2 hits in the same week count as 2 weeks). This was quite a way off the record to date in a year of 58 weeks which Middle Of The Road managed in 1972. The previous local act to spend the most time in the charts in a year was in 1970 when Peanut Butter Conspiracy took that honour with 39. Maria’s effort was the highest by a local act to date and would end up being the second highest overall for a local act.

In second place for 1973 was another local woman, Barbara Ray who managed 34 weeks. Third was the top international act, Vicky Leandros on 32 weeks and the highest placed male was at 4, Lobo on 30 weeks.

Creedence Clearwater Revival still topped the list for overall weeks from 1969 to 1973 as they sat on 119. The Sweet were second with 90 and Middle Of The Road third on 80. Dave Mills was still the top local act as he had 74 weeks under his belt and stood in 5th place overall. Barbara Ray on 66 weeks was the second highest local act and the highest placed female overall.

Freddy Breck’s ‘We Believe In Tomorrow’ was the song which spent the longest time on the charts this year as it managed 25. Barbara Ray’s ‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ was the highest local act on 22 weeks and she shared top honours for a woman with Shirley Bassey’s ‘Never Never Never’. 22 weeks was the 3rd highest total for a song this year.

NUMBER 1’s

We saw 13 different songs top the charts in 1973 and these were by 13 different acts which meant that for the second year running we had no acts score more than 1 number 1 in the year. Chris Andrews’ 3 chart toppers in 1970 was still the best for a year. Three of the number 1s in 1973 were by local acts, ‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ by Barbara Ray (6 weeks), ‘Kentucky Blues’ by Lauren Copley (4 weeks) and ‘Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet’ by Maria (4 weeks).This was the second year running that we had not seen a local male top our charts.

For the period from 1969 to 1973, 3 acts had managed 3 number 1’s, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Chris Andrews and The Hollies.

On the song front Tommy Overstreet’s 7 week run at number 1 with ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ was the best for 1973. Johnny Nash’s 12 week run at the top in 1972 was the best still the best in a year and the 13th week the song spent at the top of the charts in the first week of 1973 made it the all time best for a song.

FEMALE ACTS

This was the best year to date for female artists with them accounting for 18 of the 104 song to chart in 1973 which was 4 better than the previous best of 14 in 1971. There were 12 artists who accounted for these 18 songs, 6 of which had 2 hits each and the remaining 6 had 1. There were still no female artists to have more than 2 hits in a year, but the 6 who managed 2 this year was a best to date and 5 of the 6 were local with Vicky Leandros being the only non-local woman to achieve the 2 hits. The local woman who managed this were Barbara Ray, Jessica Jones, Lauren Copley, Letta Mbulu and Maria.

For the second year running we had 4 female chart toppers which was the best to date. The songs by women  that made the top were: ‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ by Barbara Ray; ‘Never Never Never’ by Shirley Bassey; ‘Kentucky Blues’ by Lauren Copley’ and ‘Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet’ by Maria. With the exception of ‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ all the others spent 4 weeks at the top of the charts while Barbara Ray’s hit managed 6. We were yet to see a solo female artist have a second number 1 hit.

Barbara Ray led the way in terms of number of hits to date as she had managed to chart with 5 different songs. Vicky Leandros, Jessica Jones and Lauren Copley were next on the list with3 hits each.

The top solo female songs for 1973 based on the points system described above were:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 I Don’t Wanna Play House Barbara Ray 336
2 Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet Maria 302
3 Never Never Never Shirley Bassey 300
4 Kentucky Blues Lauren Copley 285
5 The Love In Your Eyes Vicky Leandros 275

To date, the top 5 songs by females based on the points system were:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday Jessica Jones 391
2 I Don’t Wanna Play House Barbara Ray 336
3 Come What May (Aka Aprés Toi) Vicky Leandros 321
4 It’s Too Late Now Lauren Copley 303
5 Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet Maria 302

REST OF THE WORLD

Aside from artists from the UK and US (who tend to dominate most charts worldwide), and local acts the following are the top hits from other nationalities:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 We Believe In Tomorrow Freddy Breck 376 Germany
2 The Love In Your Eyes Vicky Leandros 275 Greece
3 Baby Blue George Baker Selection 268 Netherlands
4 Maori Love Song Double Vision 203 New Zealand
5 Get Down Gilbert O’ Sullivan 189 Ireland

To date the rest of the world top hits were:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationaility
1 You Peter Maffay 399 Germany
2 We Believe In Tomorrow Freddy Breck 376 Germany
3 Come What May (Aka Aprés Toi) Vicky Leandros 321 Greece
4 Butterfly Danyel Gerard 276 France
5 The Love In Your Eyes Vicky Leandros 275 Greece

For the first time, the local acts had more hits than any other nationality as they accounted for 39 of the songs that charted in 1973. The Americans were in second place with 28, followed by the Brits with 25. This was the second best year to date for the local acts, second to 1971 when they managed to chart with 41 songs. Germany Greece and Ireland all managed 2 hits while Australia, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand and Sweden all managed 1.

To date we had seen hits by 19 different nationalities with the US leading the way having accounted for 189 of them. The UK were in second place on 186 and the South African acts followed on 134. From the rest of the world we had had 13 German, 11 Canadian, 8 Dutch and 7 from Ireland and Jamaica.

WHAT DIDN’T CHART

In terms of following the UK and US charts, 1973 was not a year in which we took to the songs that made number 1 in those 2 countries during the year, in fact of the 30 songs that made it to number 1 in the UK or the US, only ‘Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree’ by Dawn topped both (as well as all topping the SA charts) no other song made both that year. The US or UK number 1′s that didn’t even make top 20 in SA were:

Rubber Bullets 10cc
The Most Beautiful Girl Charlie Rich
Half-Breed Cher
Touch Me in the Morning Diana Ross
The Twelfth of Never Donny Osmond
Young Love Donny Osmond
Keep on Truckin’ (Part 1) Eddie Kendricks
I’m the Leader of the Gang (I Am!) Gary Glitter
I Love You Love Me Love Gary Glitter
Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth) George Harrison
Midnight Train to Georgia Gladys Knight & the Pips
We’re an American Band Grand Funk
Bad, Bad Leroy Brown Jim Croce
Time in a Bottle Jim Croce
Let’s Get It On Marvin Gaye
Welcome Home Peters and Lee
Eye Level (Theme From The Thames TV Series Van Der Valk) Simon Park Orchestra
Cum On Feel the Noize Slade
Skweeze Me Pleeze Me Slade
Merry Xmas Everybody Slade
Superstition Stevie Wonder
You Are the Sunshine of My Life Stevie Wonder
Brother Louie Stories
Can the Can Suzi Quatro
Top of the World Carpenters
Frankenstein Edgar Winter Group
Love Train O’Jays
The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia Vicki Lawrence
See My Baby Jive Wizzard
Angel Fingers (A Teen Ballad) Wizzard

CHARTING IN CONSECUTIVE YEARS

The Bee Gees were the only act who had had a hit in the charts for at least 1 week in every year since 1969 with 10 acts missing out in only 1 of the 5 years we have looked at so far. Of those acts whose first hit was in 1970, 4 of them had gone on to chart in ‘71,’72 and ’73. These were The Dealians, John Edmond, Giorgio and The Rising Sons

SONGWRITERS

On the songwriting front, Terry Dempsey led the way this year, scoring 4 hits writing for Lauren Copley, Peter Lotis, Dave Mills and David Cassidy. Daniel Moore was second on 3 hits, although 2 of them were the 2 versions of ‘Shambala’ that charted by B.W. Stevenson and Three Dog Night. Moore’s other hit was ‘My Maria’ which was performed by B.W. Stevenson. 11 more songwriters had credits on 2 hits this year. Dempsey and Moore’s 1973 effort was a way off the best in a year, a record which Dempsey held for his 8 hits in 1971

No songwriter managed to have more than 1 number 1 hit which meant that the weeks at 1 title for 1973 went to the writer of the song that spent the most weeks at the top of the chart and that honour went to S.K. Dobbins who penned ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ which Tommy Overstreet took to the top of the charts for 7 weeks.

To date, Terry Dempsey was way out in front for number of hits, having written or co-written 22 songs that charted. Jeff Barry on 13 was second and the songwriting team of Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway were third on 12. Unsurprisingly Dempsey led the way for weeks on the chart, having accumulated 236 with Creedence Clearwater Revival’s John Fogerty second on 119 weeks. Jeff Barry followed with 106.

Dempsey and Fogerty were alongside Chris Andrews and Geoff Stephens at the top for number of number 1s as they had all managed 3, However it was Mike Champman aand Nicky Chinn who led the way for weeks at 1 as they had written 2 of The Sweet’s chart toppers (‘Co-Co’ and ‘Funny Funny’) and accumulated 14 weeks at the top.

That’s it for 1973, so on we go to 1974.