17 July 1970

christie_yellow_river

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 6 Yellow River  – Christie
2 3 8 Working on a Good Thing  – Outlet
3 1 9 Come Softly to Me  – Percy Sledge
4 8 3 In the Summertime  – Mungo Jerry
5 9 3 Cotton Fields (The Cotton Song)  – Beach Boys
6 7 5 Which Way You Goin’ Billy?  – Poppy Family
7 6 5 Up Around the Bend  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
8 4 7 I Don’t Believe in If Anymore  – Roger Whittaker
9 10 7 Little Green Bag  – George Baker Selection
10 5 9 Daughter of Darkness  – Tom Jones
11 15 2 The Wonder of You  – Elvis Presley
12 11 4 I Can’t Tell the Bottom from the Top  – Hollies
13 New 1 Question  – Moody Blues
14 19 2 Groovin’ with Mr. Bloe  – Mr. Bloe
15 17 3 Round and Around  – John Edmond
16 18 3 The Seeker  – Who
17 16 4 Nobodys Fool  – Jim Reeves
18 20 2 The Wedding  – Jody Wayne
19 New 1 I’ll Walk with You  – Sean Rennie
20 New 1 Why Can’t it Rain  – McCully Workshop

Percy Sledge’s ‘Come Softly To Me’ lasted 2 weeks at the top of the charts before Christie’s ‘Yellow River’ came along this week and ousted it from the number 1 spot. Local act, The Outlet, moved into second place with ‘Working On A Good Thing’.

Mr Bloe’s ‘Groovin’ With Mr. Bloe’ became the 13th instrumental song to take climber of the week as it moved up 5 from 19 to 14.

Last week’s biggest climber, The Beach Boys’ ‘Cotton Fields (The Cotton Song)’, was 1 of 3 other songs that made a star rater climb as it moved up 4 from 9 to 5. The other 2 that managed a 4 place jump were Mungo Jerry’s ‘In The Summertime’ and Elvis Presley’s ‘The Wonder Of You’ which moved up to 4 and 11 respectively. For both The Beach Boys and Elvis Presley it was a 10th time with a star rater and they were the 17th and 18th acts to reach this total.

Tom Jones brought us the faller of the week with ‘Daughter Of Darkness’ dropping 5 from 5 to 10. This was his 9th time with the faller of the week award and he was the second act to have this many. He sat 1 behind The Bee Gees for this record with the latter being on 10.

Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan’s ‘Tennessee Bird Walk’ was the first of 3 songs to leave the top 20 this week. The song had lasted 5 weeks in the top 20 and peaked at 14. This would be the only SA chart action Blanchard or Morgan would see.

The other 2 songs to leave were the 2 songs from the Eurovision Song Contest that had been gracing our charts. The winner of that event, Dana’s ‘All Kinds Of Everything’  did not fare as well on our charts as the song that came second, Mary Hopkin’s ‘Knock Knock Who’s There’. The former spent 8 weeks in the charts and peaked 7 while the latter, which spent 9 weeks in the charts ended up with a peak of 2, a peak which matched its top position it managed on the UK charts and with it coming second at Eurovision it was definitely a case of always the bridesmaid, never the bride. For Dana, ‘All Kinds Of Everything’ would be her only SA chart hit while Mary Hopkin, whose SA chart career also came to an end, had managed 2 hits, both of which peaked at 2 (the other being ‘Those Were The Days’). She spent a total of 20 weeks in the charts and this meant she was the 10th highest female on the weeks count list sitting tied 64th overall.

The departure of the 3 songs mentioned above meant that we had no duets/collaborations on the charts and no solo female artists. We had seen a duet in the top 20 for the past 11weeks and at least 1 song by a solo female artist for the past 9 weeks. This was the tied second lowest total consecutive weeks we had had a woman on the charts, having seen a 9 week run once before and two 7 week runs previously.

We also saw 2 songs take over as the oldest on the charts as ‘Knock Knock Who’s There’ had been the granddaddy of last week’s chart. This week Tom Jones’ ‘Daughter Of Darkness’ and Percy Sledge’s ‘Come Softly To Me’ shared the title, both songs being on 9 weeks. They were the 12th and 13th songs to become the oldest on a lowest to date weeks count of 9 (excluding the songs on the very first top 20).

We welcomed The Moody Blues to our charts for the first time. Their hit, ‘Question’ was a number 2 hit for them in the UK and it managed to get to number 21 in the US. This song was written by band member Justin Hayward and it was originally entitled ‘A Question Of Balance’. Hayward, who contributed to Jeff Wayne’s musical ‘The War Of The Worlds’, would be the only person with the first name Justin to have song writing credits on a song charting on our charts.

Sean Rennie also made his SA chart debut with a song called ‘I’ll Walk With You’. Rennie was born in Ireland. He had auditioned for the Vienna Boys Choir but unfortunately for him and fortunately for us he was not accepted and as he made his way to South Africa in 1964, so I have claimed him as one of us for statistical purposes. Once he got to SA he formed a group called Purple Haze which got him noticed as a singer. ‘I’ll Walk With You’ lists G Garzouzie as a song writer alongside a certain David Gresham. Gruesome Gresh, who used to present the top 20 on Springbok Radio (as if I have to remind you of this) also produce the song.

The final new entry was also by a local act and was McCully Workshop’s ‘Why Can’t It Rain’. This, alongside the Sean Rennie hit above, boosted the local content of the charts back up to 5 and with Jody Wayne’s new entry from last week sitting at 18, we saw the 7th occasion where the bottom 3 songs on the chart were local (2 of those 7 had had the bottom 4 songs being local). ‘Why Can’t It Rain’ was written by Tully McCully in the middle of the night and features Falling Mirror’s ‘Allan Faull on guitar. A certain Billy Forrest produced the song.

The gap between the total number of hits to date by US and UK acts fell to its lowest level in nearly half a year. The Americans were still out in front with 258 so far, but the Brits were now 18 behind them with their total being 240. The last time the gap was 18 was 24 weeks previously. In the interim, the Americans had at best been 23 hits ahead.

Jody Wayne was enjoying his 20th week on the charts, but was unmoved at 15 on the local weeks count list, still 2 behind tied 13th placed Carike Keuzenkamp and Hilary who were on 22. On the overall list, The Beach Boys drew level 6th with The Rolling Stones as both acts were on 91 weeks while Percy Sledge took 11th place to himself as his 77 to date placed him 1 ahead of Engelbert Humperdinck whom he shared 11th place with last week.

Sledge was also celebrating moving past the 800 points mark as his total ticked over to 809.

Youtube playlist:

10 July 1970

percy_softly

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Come Softly to Me  – Percy Sledge
2 4 5 Yellow River  – Christie
3 5 7 Working on a Good Thing  – Outlet
4 2 6 I Don’t Believe in If Anymore  – Roger Whittaker
5 3 8 Daughter of Darkness  – Tom Jones
6 8 4 Up Around the Bend  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
7 12 4 Which Way You Goin’ Billy?  – Poppy Family
8 16 2 In the Summertime  – Mungo Jerry
9 18 2 Cotton Fields (The Cotton Song)  – Beach Boys
10 7 6 Little Green Bag  – George Baker Selection
11 14 3 I Can’t Tell the Bottom from the Top  – Hollies
12 6 9 Knock Knock Who’s There  – Mary Hopkin
13 9 8 All Kinds of Everything  – Dana
14 15 5 Tennessee Bird Walk  – Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan
15 New 1 The Wonder of You  – Elvis Presley
16 17 3 Nobodys Fool  – Jim Reeves
17 19 2 Round and Around  – John Edmond
18 20 2 The Seeker  – Who
19 New 1 Groovin’ with Mr. Bloe  – Mr. Bloe
20 New 1 The Wedding  – Jody Wayne

Last week Percy Sledge’s ‘Come Softly To Me’ had the distinction of being the 100th song to top our charts. This week, as it clung to the top spot for a second week, ‘Come Softly To Me’ had the distinction of clocking up the 100th week at number 1 for the US acts. It had taken them 270 weeks from their first number 1 (on the very first chart) to reach this landmark. In contract, the British acts took 226 weeks from the first time a Pom topped the charts till they reached the 100 weeks mark. Roger Whittaker’s ‘I Don’t Believe In If Anymore’, last week’s number 2, dropped to 4 while Christie’s ‘Yellow River’ swapped places with it to move into second place.

The climber of the week award went to The Beach Boys’ ‘Cotton Fields (The Cotton Song)’ which moved up 9 places from 18 to 9. This was the 7th time the band had taken this honour and they were the 8th act to reach this many biggest climbers. It had been more than 4 months since we last saw a climb of this magnitude and this was the second biggest gap to date between seeing climbs of 9 or more places. The longest period we had gone so far with all climbs being less than 9 places was 36 weeks which occurred between the 2nd ever chart and the 38th chart. This was The Beach Boys’ 4th time with a climb of 9 or more places and the next best on this front was 2 which 7 other acts had achieved.

Mungo Jerry’s ‘In The Summertime’ was rather hard done by as it climbed 8 from 16 to 8, but had to settle for being just a star rater as it was outdone by The Beach Boys’ hit. The Poppy Family’s ‘Which Way You Goin’ Billy?’ was this week’s only other star rater, moving up 5 from 12 to 7.

Mary Hopkin’s ‘Knock Knock Who’s There’ fell 6 from 6 to 12 to have this week’s biggest drop and we had to go right back to the January of 1970 to last see a solo female artist take the biggest faller award. We had seen both Diana Ross and Bobbie Gentry be part of the biggest faller in the interim but these were both with hits where they collaborated with another act (The Supremes in the case of the former and Glen Campbell in the latter’s case). The last purely solo female hit to be the biggest faller was ‘I’ll Never Fall In Love Again’ by Bobbie Gentry. The good news for Mary Hopkin was that her hit was the oldest on the chart on 9 weeks following the departure of last week’s oldest (see below). The previous hit by a solo woman to be the oldest was Jackie Deshannon’s ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’ back in the November of 1969. Ignoring the hits on the very first chart, this was the 11th time a song on 9 weeks had become the oldest. We were yet to see a song on less weeks take the honour.

The oldest on last week’s chart, ‘Ma Belle Amie’ was the first of 3 songs to depart the chart. It had been with us for 16 weeks, 3 of which were spent at number 1. This would be the band’s only SA chart hit. Of the 4 hits to date by Dutch acts, this one was out front for points scored having clocked up 231 in total. The next highest was Shocking Blue’s ‘Venus’ on 153. By the time the charts ended in 1989 ‘Ma Belle Amie’ would have dropped to being the 3rd best performance by a song by a Dutch band.

The second song to go was also a former number 1. Chris Andrews’ ‘Carol OK’ had spent 2 weeks at number 1 during its 14 weeks with us. The good news for Chris was that his chart career was not yet over.

Last of the leavers was Cuff Links’ ‘When Julie Comes Around’ which enjoyed a 7 week stay in the top 20 and climbed to a top position of 6 during that time. The departure of this song heralded an end to Cuff Links SA chart adventures. They had had 2 hits, spent a total of 18 weeks in the top 20 and ‘When Julie Comes Around’s  peak of 6 just pipped the number 7 peak of their other hit, ‘Tracy’.

Elvis’s 8th SA chart hit was ‘The Wonder Of You’ which debuted on the top 20 this week. The song was a 3rd hit for song writer Baker Knight who had already seen SA chart action with his compositions ‘I Need You’ by Rick Nelson and Dean Martin’s ‘Not Enough Indians’. ‘The Wonder Of You’ first charted for Ray Peterson in1959 and would give him a number 25 hit in the US and a number 23 hit in the UK. That same year Ronnie Hilton took his version to number 22 in the UK. Elvis’ version would go to 9 in the US while in the UK it would knock Mungo Jerry’s ‘In The Summertime’ from the top spot there and go on to spend 6 weeks at 1.

Mr. Bloe was not an ou, it was a group of musicians drafted in to record a song called ‘Groovin’ With Mr. Bloe’. The song started life as a throwaway b-side to a single called ‘Make Believe’ by a US band called Wind. Wind featured Tony Orlando who would go on to have a number of hits with the group Dawn. ‘Make Believe’ went to number 28 in the US but when it got to the UK the b-side was inadvertently played on the radio. Stephen James of Dick James Music wanted to release the song, but could not obtain the rights, so he did the next best thing and got a group of musicians together to record a cover version. The initial attempt included a certain Elton John on piano, but James didn’t like that version and it was re-recorded with Zack Laurence on piano. This re-recorded version would go to number 2 in the UK and was kept off the top spot by Mungo Jerry’s ‘In The Summertime’. ‘Groovin’ With Mr. Bloe’ was the 23rd instrumental to make our charts.

Our final new entry was ‘The Wedding’ by Jody Wayne and he set a new record for gaps between hits for a local act. We had last seen Wayne on the charts 156 weeks previously when ‘Cookie’, his duet with Glenys Lynne, was in the top 20. This beat the previous record of 140 weeks being absent from the charts by a local act which Dickie Loader had held. Overall Wayne’s absence was the 4th biggest gap to date that any act had seen. ‘The Wedding’ was originally a Spanish song called ‘La Novia’ which was written in 1964 by Joaquin Prieto. In 1964 Julie Rogers took an English version to number 3 in the UK. This was Jody Wayne’s 4th SA chart hit and he drafted in McCully Workshop to play the instruments.

Mary Hopkin was enjoying her 20th week on the charts while The Beach Boys reached the 90 weeks milestone. The latter was not enough to move them up the weeks count list, but they were now just 1 week behind 6th placed Rolling Stones. Percy Sledge on the other hand was moving up the list, his 76 weeks to date put him level in 11th place with Engelbert Humperdinck. Elvis took 13th place for himself as he moved 1 week ahead of Donovan. On the local list we saw Jody Wayne move 1 week ahead of The Square Set, his 19 weeks to date giving him 15th place to himself while The Square Set dropped to 16.

Tom Jones was still racking up the points and this week he moved past the 1,900 mark. His 1,904 put him 618 ahead of second placed The Troggs who were on 1,286. Jones was currently averaging 136 points per song which was quite a bit higher than the overall average points for all songs which currently stood on 85.9.

The average time this week’s top 20 songs had spent in the charts dipped below 5 weeks for the first time in 44 weeks. The average now stood at 4.35.

Youtube playlist:

3 July 1970

percy_softly

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 7 Come Softly to Me  – Percy Sledge
2 3 5 I Don’t Believe in If Anymore  – Roger Whittaker
3 1 7 Daughter of Darkness  – Tom Jones
4 5 4 Yellow River  – Christie
5 10 6 Working on a Good Thing  – Outlet
6 4 8 Knock Knock Who’s There  – Mary Hopkin
7 15 5 Little Green Bag  – George Baker Selection
8 14 3 Up Around the Bend  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
9 7 7 All Kinds of Everything  – Dana
10 8 7 When Julie Comes Around  – Cuff Links
11 6 14 Carol Ok  – Chris Andrews
12 17 3 Which Way You Goin’ Billy?  – Poppy Family
13 11 16 Ma Belle Amie  – Tee Set
14 19 2 I Can’t Tell the Bottom from the Top  – Hollies
15 18 4 Tennessee Bird Walk  – Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan
16 New 1 In the Summertime  – Mungo Jerry
17 20 2 Nobodys Fool  – Jim Reeves
18 New 1 Cotton Fields (The Cotton Song)  – Beach Boys
19 New 1 Round and Around  – John Edmond
20 New 1 The Seeker  – Who

Percy Sledge clocked up his second number 1 as ‘Come Softly To Me’ knocked Tom Jones’ ‘Daughter Of Darkness’ from the top spot after the latter had been there for 3 weeks. Sledge’s previous chart topper, ‘My Special Prayer’ had managed to spend 2 weeks at 1. What was significant about the new number 1 was that it was the 100th song to top our charts.

The George Baker Selection’s ‘Little Green Bag’ took top honours for climbing this week as it moved up 8 places from 15 to 7. This equalled the record to date biggest climb for a song in its 5th week on the charts with the only other song managing to do this so far being Steam’s ‘Na Na Hey Hey (Kiss Him Goodbye)’.

There were 4 other songs that made star rater status this week, 3 of which moved up 5 places and those were The Outlet’s ‘Working On A Good Thing’ which moved up to 5, The Poppy Family’s ‘Which Way You Goin’ Billy’ which moved up to 12 and The Hollies’ ‘I Can’t tell The Bottom From The Top’ which climbed to 14. Creedence Clearwater Revival’s 6 place climb to 8 with ‘Up Around The Bend’ was the other star rater. Creedence were the 16th act to reach 10 star raters while The Hollies became the 4th act to reach 15. Creedence had managed to get to their 10 star raters in a record to date 58 weeks from the time they first entered the charts. This smashed the old record by 24 weeks which was previously held by Engelbert Humperdick who took 82 weeks.

Chris Andrews’ ‘Carol OK’ gave him his 3rd biggest faller award as the song dropped 5 places from 6 to 11 to take the honours this week.

Jeronimo’s ‘Heya’ was the first of 4 songs to leave the charts this week. It lasted 5 weeks and peaked at 13. This would be their only SA chart entry.

Omega Limited’s ‘Tchaikovsky One’ enjoyed a 12 week run in the charts and peaked at 3 during that time. Like Jeronimo, this would be their only SA chart hit. From a points perspective it sat 6th highest of the instrumentals that had charted to date.

The oldest song on last week’s chart, Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ departed from the top 20 after having been with us for 17 weeks. It had spent 4 of those 17 weeks at number 1. It managed to accumulate 256 point which placed it 6th highest for points by a local song and 15th highest overall. Dave would grace our charts again at later date. Tee Set’s ‘Ma Belle Amie’ on 16 weeks, took over as the oldest in the charts.

Last to go was Tidal Waves’ ‘Spider Spider’ which spent 12 weeks in the charts and peaked at number 1 for just 1 week. It spent its last week at number 9, becoming the 11th song to leave from this high a position, with 1 song (Leapy Lee’s ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’) currently holding the record as it spent its last week at 8. ‘Spider Spider’ set a new record for the highest last week position for a local song as the record to date had been 12 as the final place which 4 songs (including Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ this week) had managed. This was the second time we had seen 3 local songs leave the chart in the same week. It would also be the only time we would see more than 1 local chart toppers (this week we saw 2, ‘Spider Spider’ and ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’) leave the charts in the same week.

Mungo Jerry’s ‘In The Summertime’ was the first of the new entries. The song was a global smash hit, topping the charts in over 20 countries, including the UK (for 7 weeks), Germany, Australia and Canada. The US would be the one big market it failed to completely dominate, but did make it to number 3 there (Diana Ross’ ‘Ain’t No Mountain High Enough’ was at 2 that week and Edwin Starr’s ‘War’ was at 1). That said, it has still sold in excess of 30 million copies worldwide. Mungo Jerry was not a person, but a band and they took their name from a T.S. Eliot poem called ‘Mungojerrie  And Rumpelteazer’. In 1995 Shaggy recorded a cover version of ‘In The Summertime’ which also charted globally, but failed to top any major charts, going to 5 in the UK and emulating the original’s US success by going to 3 there.

The Beach Boys returned to the charts after an 87 week absence. This was the 10th largest gap between hits to date for a US act and the 17th largest so far overall. Their new one was ‘Cotton Fields (The Cotton Song)’, a cover of a song by Leadbelly from 1940. The Beach Boys originally recorded their version in 1968 but then re-recorded it in 1969. It failed to make the US Hot 100 (peaking at 103 there). It found more success across the Atlantic where it went to number 5 in the UK.

Terry Dempsey’s hit count as a song writer was rising rapidly and his previous 2 composition that charted had both gone all the way to number 1 (Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ and Tidal Waves’ ‘Spider Spider’). As mentioned above, both these songs left the charts this week after their successful runs, so the new one that bore Terry’s name in the song writing slot, John Edmonds’ ‘Round And Around’, had tough acts to follow. ‘Round And Around’ was Dempsey’s 6th hit as a song writer and Edmond’s second as artist. In neighbouring Rhodesia, as it was back then, the b-side of the South African version of ‘Round And Around’, a song called ‘Farewell Britannia’, would be a number 17 hit there. The Rhodesian pressing of ‘Farewell Britannia’ did not, however feature ‘Round And Around’ on its b-side, but was rather paired with a song called ‘The Little World Of Children’

Our final new entry was a 3rd hit for The Who. ‘The Seeker’ came from their excellently titled ‘Meaty Beaty Big And Bouncy’ album. It would give the band a number 19 hit in the UK and would be the 6th of their 15 hits they had had up to then that would not make the top 10. In the US it would be their 10th hit, peaking at number 44. To date, The Who have only managed 1 top 10 hit in the US and that was 1967’s ‘I Can See For Miles’ which made it to number 9.

The arrival of The Who’s song on the charts moved the total weeks count for hits by artists from the UK on to 2,000 weeks. The Poms sat 106 weeks behind the Yanks for total weeks.

This week was the 22nd time we had seen 4 new entries and this was the 10th time within those 22 that all 4 acts had been on a different hit count with this week seeing Mungo Jerry getting their 1st hit, John Edmond his second, The Who their 3rd and The Beach Boys spoiling the sequence by getting their 8th. We had seen 2 occasions where we had 4 new entries and the various acts were on their 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th hits respectively.

We had gone 4 weeks with not seeing any acts reach a weeks count milestone (a milestone in this case being a multiple of 10 greater than or equal to 20), but this week saw Creedence Clearwater Revival reaching their 60th week with us. They were the second quickest to reach this total, taking 58 weeks from when they first charted. The Rolling Stones held the record to date, taking just 48 weeks to reach a total weeks count of 60 (remember 2 songs in the charts in the same week count as 2 weeks).

The Hollies moved back ahead of Herman’s Hermits for weeks on the charts, their 96 to date placing them 1 ahead. They remained at 4 on the weeks count list, but Herman’s Hermits dropped to 5.

Youtube playlist:

26 June 1970

jones_daughter

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Daughter of Darkness  – Tom Jones
2 5 6 Come Softly to Me  – Percy Sledge
3 9 4 I Don’t Believe in If Anymore  – Roger Whittaker
4 2 7 Knock Knock Who’s There  – Mary Hopkin
5 11 3 Yellow River  – Christie
6 3 13 Carol Ok  – Chris Andrews
7 7 6 All Kinds of Everything  – Dana
8 6 6 When Julie Comes Around  – Cuff Links
9 4 12 Spider Spider  – Tidal Wave
10 13 5 Working on a Good Thing  – Outlet
11 8 15 Ma Belle Amie  – Tee Set
12 12 17 Love is a Beautiful Song  – Dave Mills
13 10 12 Tchaikovsky One  – Omega Limited
14 19 2 Up Around the Bend  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
15 16 4 Little Green Bag  – George Baker Selection
16 17 5 Heya  – Jeronimo
17 20 2 Which Way You Goin’ Billy?  – Poppy Family
18 18 3 Tennessee Bird Walk  – Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan
19 New 1 I Can’t Tell the Bottom from the Top  – Hollies
20 New 1 Nobodys Fool  – Jim Reeves

‘Daughter Of Darkness’ spent a 3rd week at the top of our charts, edging Tom Jones closer to a magical 20 weeks at 1 as his total ticked over to 18. Percy Sledge’s ‘Come Softly To Me’ followed up its 3 weeks in a row with the biggest climber with a further 3 place climb, snuggling into the number 2 position.

We had 2 songs climbing 6 places to take the climber of the week award and they were Roger Whittaker’s ‘I Don’t Believe In If Anymore’ and Christie’s ‘Yellow River’ which moved up to 3 and 5 respectively. The only other star rater this week was Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Up Around The Bend’ which moved up 5 places from 19 to 14. This was their 9th star rater and they were the 19th act to reach this total.

Tidal Wave’s ‘Spider Spider’ was the faller of the week, dropping 5 places form 4 to 9. This was the 58th time the faller had been a local song and for anyone who is remotely interested, the average places that these 58 local biggest fallers had dropped in order to be biggest faller was 5.31 places. This is slightly less than the overall average at this stage of 5.42.

Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ moved into its 17th week on the chart and enjoyed its 6th week as the oldest in the top 20.

The Pipkin’s time in our charts ended this week as their only SA chart hit, ‘Gimme Dat Ding’ left the top 20 after a run of 3 weeks and a highest placing of 15.

Doing a fair bit better was Simon & Garfunkel’s ‘Bridge Over Troubled Water’ which spent 14 weeks in the charts and peaked at peaked at 4. This ended the chart career for the two as a duo, but both Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel would return to our top 20 as solo artists. As Simon & Garfunkel they had 4 SA chart hits, spent 49 weeks in the charts and enjoyed a week at the top of the charts with ‘The Sounds Of Silence’, their best peaking song.

The Hollies’ 12th hit, ‘I Can’t Tell The Bottom From The Top’ arrived in the charts this week. This placed the band tied 2nd for number of hits, joining Cliff Richard 2 hits behind leader Tom Jones. The song would go to 82 in the US and make it to number 7 in the UK. The song was written by Doug Flett and Guy Fletcher and was a first SA chart hit for both of them. Like The Hollies’ previous hit, ‘He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother’, ‘I Can’t Tell The Bottom From The Top’ featured a pre-famous Elton John on piano.

It had been 104 weeks since Jim Reeves last featured in the charts, but he returned this week with ‘Nobody’s Fool’.  This gap between hits was the 13th largest to date and the 8th largest for a US act. As with our other new entry this week, ‘Nobody’s Fool’ was an SA chart debut for the song writer who, in this case, was Hal Bynum. The song would go to number 10 on the US Country Singles Charts but would not cross over to the main Billboard Hot 100. What it would do is cross over the Atlantic where, in the UK, it went to number 32.

We had now had 2 weeks with 7 different nations being represented in the charts (US, UK, SA, Kenya, Netherlands, Germany and Canada) and this was the 3rd week of the last 4 we had seen this, with the first week of this run being the first time we saw it.

7 weeks previously, Herman’s Hermits moved ahead of The Hollies for weeks count, causing the latter to drop to 5 on the weeks count list. This week, The Hollies made up the lost ground and were back into tied 4th place with Herman’s Hermits with 95 weeks to their name. On the local front, Dave Mills moved ahead of Virginia Lee with the former now on 37. Virginia dropped to 6th on the local weeks count list while Mills made 5th place his own.

Youtube playlist:

19 June 1970

jones_daughter

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 5 Daughter of Darkness  – Tom Jones
2 4 6 Knock Knock Who’s There  – Mary Hopkin
3 2 12 Carol Ok  – Chris Andrews
4 3 11 Spider Spider  – Tidal Wave
5 9 5 Come Softly to Me  – Percy Sledge
6 7 5 When Julie Comes Around  – Cuff Links
7 8 5 All Kinds of Everything  – Dana
8 6 14 Ma Belle Amie  – Tee Set
9 11 3 I Don’t Believe in If Anymore  – Roger Whittaker
10 5 11 Tchaikovsky One  – Omega Limited
11 14 2 Yellow River  – Christie
12 10 16 Love is a Beautiful Song  – Dave Mills
13 16 4 Working on a Good Thing  – Outlet
14 12 14 Bridge Over Troubled Water  – Simon & Garfunkel
15 17 3 Gimme Dat Ding  – Pipkins
16 19 3 Little Green Bag  – George Baker Selection
17 13 4 Heya  – Jeronimo
18 20 2 Tennessee Bird Walk  – Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan
19 New 1 Up Around the Bend  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
20 New 1 Which Way You Goin’ Billy?  – Poppy Family

Tom Jones’ weeks at 1 total moved on to 17 as ‘Daughter Of Darkness’ enjoyed a 2nd week at the top of the charts, seeing off the challenge of Mark Hopkin’s ‘Knock Knock Who’s There’ which moved up 2 places to number 2. Geoff Stephens, who had song writing credits on both the number 1 and 2 songs this week, had double cause for celebration as he reached the 100 weeks in the charts mark for songs he had helped compose. Of the 101 weeks (2 in the charts in the same week counts as 2), his compositions had spent 11 at the top spot, the tied 4th highest to date for a song writer.

Percy Sledge’s ‘Come Softly To Me’ became the first song to take the biggest climber award 3 times as it once again gained the most ground of any song this week. It climbed 5 places from 10 to 5 to add to the 4 place climb the previous week and 5 place jump the week before that both took biggest climber. Sledge was also the 7th act to reach 7 biggest climbers and only the 2nd solo male (after Tom Jones) to do this with the other 5 all being groups.

‘Come Softly To Me’ was the only star rater this week and Sledge moved into tied 2nd place for number of star raters, his 15 to date moving him level with Herman’s Hermits and together they sat 4 behind leader Tom Jones who was on 19.

The faller of the week was Omega Limited’s ‘Tchaikovsky One’ which fell 5 places from 5 to 10. It was the second time the song had been the biggest faller. The previous version of this piece to charts (by Second City Sound) was never the biggest faller. So far 12 of the 22 instrumental hits to chart had been the biggest faller at least once.

We lost 2 songs from the charts this week with Andy William’s ‘Can’t Help Falling In Love’ being the first of these. The song fared better than Williams’ only other hit to date, ‘Happy Heart’, as it spent 6 weeks in the top 20 as opposed to its predecessor’s 2, and peaked at 9, 7 places higher than his first hit. There were still bigger and better hits to come from Andy.

We also bid those ‘Tantes Van Nantes’ totsiens, the Al Debbo/Nico Carstens hit having ‘kuiered ‘ with us for 7 weeks and peaked at 11. This would be Carstens’ only SA chart hit as an artist and it would also herald the end of Debbo’s SA chart career. Debbo had seen his first and second hit peak at 7 and then interestingly his 2nd and 3rd hits both spent 7 weeks in the charts which kept the ‘7’ theme going. In total Debbo had enjoyed 24 weeks in the charts and sat 11th on the SA weeks count list.

Creedence Clearwater Revival were becoming a difficult band to pin down as 2 hits previously they were ‘Down On The Corner’, then they became a ‘Travellin’ Band’ and now they were ‘Up Around The Bend’ with their new one. This was their 6th hit to make our charts and they were the second quickest so far to reach 6 hits, taking just 56 weeks from the date their first song charted till now, the week their 6th hit entered the charts. They were beaten only by The Rolling Stones in getting to 6 hits as the latter managed it in 54 weeks. ‘Up Around The Bend’ was their 11th US Hot 100 hit where it went to number 4. In the UK it was their 6th hit there and managed to go 1 place higher than its US peak, getting to number 3.

The Canadians continued to put space between them and the 5th placed nation for hits as the second new entry was ‘Which Way You Goin’ Billy?’ by The Poppy Family who hailed from Vancouver. The group was made up of the husband and wife team of Terry and Susan Jacks. Terry would go on to have global success with his hit ‘Seasons In The Sun’. The Wikipedia entry for the song says that it topped the charts in Canada and the US, however it does not feature on Wikipedia’s list of Number 1s in Canada and, from the information I have managed to obtain on the Canadian charts, it only made number 9 there. Wikipedia is closer with the US charts as it peaked at 2 there. The Canadian artists were now 7 hits ahead of 5th placed Australia who had 8 to their name and the Canadians also celebrated having clocked up a total of 100 weeks in the charts. Their return to the charts moved us back up to the record to date 7 different nations represented in the top 20.

Dave Mills, whose ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ was still the oldest on the chart, moved on to 36 weeks in the charts in total and this placed him tied 5th on the local weeks count list, joining Virginia Lee on that total.

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12 June 1970

jones_daughter

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 4 Daughter of Darkness  – Tom Jones
2 3 11 Carol Ok  – Chris Andrews
3 1 10 Spider Spider  – Tidal Wave
4 4 5 Knock Knock Who’s There  – Mary Hopkin
5 6 10 Tchaikovsky One  – Omega Limited
6 5 13 Ma Belle Amie  – Tee Set
7 8 4 When Julie Comes Around  – Cuff Links
8 10 4 All Kinds of Everything  – Dana
9 13 4 Come Softly to Me  – Percy Sledge
10 7 15 Love is a Beautiful Song  – Dave Mills
11 15 2 I Don’t Believe in If Anymore  – Roger Whittaker
12 9 13 Bridge Over Troubled Water  – Simon & Garfunkel
13 14 3 Heya  – Jeronimo
14 New 1 Yellow River  – Christie
15 11 7 Die Tantes van Nantes  – Al Debbo & Nico Carstens
16 19 3 Working on a Good Thing  – Outlet
17 18 2 Gimme Dat Ding  – Pipkins
18 12 6 Can’t Help Falling in Love  – Andy Williams
19 20 2 Little Green Bag  – George Baker Selection
20 New 1 Tennessee Bird Walk  – Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan

Tom Jones pulled 2 clear of his nearest rivals for the top spot on the number of number 1s list as ‘Daughter Of Darkness’ became his 5th chart topper. There were 7 acts tied in a clogged up second place on the list, all of them having had 3. Les Reed and Geoff Stephens who co-wrote ‘Daughter Of Darkness’ also sat at the top of the same list but for song writers, although unlike Jones, they had to share the top spot with Robin and Barry Gibb who had also seen 4 of their compositions reach the number 1 spot. Last week’s number 1, Tidal Waves’ ‘Spider Spider’, fell to number 3 after having enjoyed just 1 week at the top of the charts.

Percy Sledge picked up a 6th biggest climber award as ‘Come Softly To Me’ moved up 4 places from 13 to 9. It shared the honours with Roger Whittaker’s ‘I Don’t Believe In If Anymore’ which climbed 4 to 11. This was a first time with a biggest climber for Whittaker. These 2 were not only the biggest climbers but also the only star raters. For Sledge it was his 14th time with a star rater and he became the 5th act to reach this many.

Andy Williams should have called his song ‘Can’t Help Falling Down The Charts’ as ‘Can’t Help Falling In Love’ was the biggest faller for a second week running. It dropped 6 from 12 to 18 this week to add to the 3 place drop that led him to share the award with Boris Gardiner the previous week.

Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ was into its 4th week as the oldest on the chart. It had been with us for a total of 15 weeks so far and this was a coming of age for local solo male artists as this was the 21st week they had seen one of their number have the oldest on the charts.

Pickettywitch’s ‘That Same Old Feeling’ lasted just 4 weeks in the top 20 with last week being its last week. It managed to get to 17 during its time on the charts and this would be the band’s only SA chart entry.

We also bid farewell to Boris Gardiner’s ‘Elizabethan Reggae’ which fared better than its co-leaver, managing to reach number 7 during its 7 week run. Like the SA males’ weeks with oldest on the charts, the magic number here was again 21 as ‘Elizabethan Reggae’ was the 21st song to have matching weeks and peak figures which made 7 the outright leader for the most popular number to have equal weeks and peaks with as it was the 6th time this combination had arisen, pulling 7 one clear of 8, the latter figure having been seen 5 times. The departure of the Jamaican act meant we were back down to 6 nations represented in the top 20 after just 1 weeks of our record to date 7.

Our first new entry was ‘Yellow River’ by a UK band called Christie. The band was led by Jeff Christie (hence their name) who also wrote the song and ‘Yellow River’ would give them a number 1 hit in the UK, Norway, Finland and Ireland. Despite the song lyrics being inspired by the thoughts of a soldier during the American Civil War, the song would only get to number 23 there. In Australia, due to a dispute between record labels and radio stations, UK and US artists were denied airplay. Consequently local Aussie bands scored hits with covers of the big international tracks and one of these was Jigsaw’s cover of ‘Yellow River’ which made number 2 or number 5 there depending on if you looked at the Go Set Charts or the Kent Report charts, 2 different takes on the charts down under that are both recognised as ‘official’.

Husband and wife duo, Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan, brought us the other new entry this week in the form of ‘Tennessee Bird Walk’. This was the 17th song by a duet or collaboration to make our charts and it would top the Country singles charts in both America and Canada. On the main charts it went to 23 in the US and 12 in Canada. Jack and Misty were born in the same hospital in Florida with Jack being 3 years and 15 days older than his wife.

On the weeks front, Al Debbo took 11th place on the local weeks count list for himself as his 24 to date moved him 1 clear of Dickie Loader.

‘Tchaikovsky One’ moved on to 16 weeks in total for the 2 versions of the song that had charted and this moved it tied 12th for weeks by a song charting in more than 1 version, joining Bob Lind and Judy Page’s versions of ‘Elusive Butterfly’ and ‘This Is My Song’ which had charted for Petula Clark as well as for Harry Secombe.

The average number of weeks the songs in this weeks’ top 20 had been in the charts was exactly 6. This was the 10th time we had seen the average be a whole number with it having been 6 for 5 times and 5 for 4 times and then on the very first chart it was 1.

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5 June 1970

spider_tidal3

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 9 Spider Spider  – Tidal Wave
2 6 3 Daughter of Darkness  – Tom Jones
3 1 10 Carol Ok  – Chris Andrews
4 8 4 Knock Knock Who’s There  – Mary Hopkin
5 4 12 Ma Belle Amie  – Tee Set
6 3 9 Tchaikovsky One  – Omega Limited
7 5 14 Love is a Beautiful Song  – Dave Mills
8 11 3 When Julie Comes Around  – Cuff Links
9 7 12 Bridge Over Troubled Water  – Simon & Garfunkel
10 15 3 All Kinds of Everything  – Dana
11 12 6 Die Tantes van Nantes  – Al Debbo & Nico Carstens
12 9 5 Can’t Help Falling in Love  – Andy Williams
13 18 3 Come Softly to Me  – Percy Sledge
14 19 2 Heya  – Jeronimo
15 New 1 I Don’t Believe in If Anymore  – Roger Whittaker
16 13 7 Elizabethan Reggae  – Boris Gardiner
17 17 4 That Same Old Feeling  – Pickettywitch
18 New 1 Gimme Dat Ding  – Pipkins
19 20 2 Working on a Good Thing  – Outlet
20 New 1 Little Green Bag  – George Baker Selection

Tidal Wave’s ‘Spider Spider’ became the 13th local song to top our charts as it moved into the number 1 position, knocking Chris Andrews’ ‘Carol OK’ from there after the latter had spent 2 weeks at 1. ‘Spider Spider’ had taken 9 weeks to reach the number 1 position which was the new slowest climb to the top for a local song, beating the 8 weeks that Quentin E. Klopjaeger’s ‘Lazy Life’ took. It was also the tied highest second longest overall, being 1 week quicker than the 10 weeks it took ‘My Special Prayer’ by Percy Sledge to make pole position. 2 others songs had taken 9 weeks and they were ‘Only One Woman’ by Marbles and ‘Suspicious Minds’ by Elvis Presley.

There were 3 songs that shared the biggest climber award this week and they were Dana’s ‘All Kinds Of Everything’, Percy Sledge’s ‘Come Softly To Me’ and Jeronimo’s ‘Heya’ which all climbed 5 places to land at 10, 13 and 14 respectively. It was a 5th biggest climber for Sledge and a first for the other 2 artists. It was also Sledge’s 13th star rater.

2 other songs managed a star rater climb and they were Tom Jones’ ‘Daughter Of Darkness’ and Mary Hopkin’s ‘Knock Knock Who’s There’ which both climbed 4 to land at 2 and 4 respectively. It was a 19th star rater for Jones.

The biggest fall this week was 3 places and 3 songs managed this. They were Omega Limited’s ‘Tchaikovsky One’, Andy Williams’ ‘Can’t Help Falling In Love’ and Boris Gardiner’s ‘Elizabethan Reggae’ which fell to 6, 12 and 16 respectively.

Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ clocked up its 14th week and was enjoying its 3rd week as the oldest on the chart.

Ken J. Larkin’s ‘She’s Gone’ was gone from the charts this week. It spent 4 weeks in the Top 20 and peaked at 16, his lowest weeks and peak figures to date. The good news for him was that he still had one more hit left to come.

White Plains’ ‘My Baby Loves Lovin’ joined ‘She’s Gone’ in leaving the charts. It spent 7 weeks with us and peaked at 8. This would be their only SA chart hit.

Last to go was the 24th song to leave the top 20 from within the top 10 as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Travellin’ Band’ left the charts from position 10 last week, after 11 weeks and a peak of 5. Of their 5 hits to date, only 1 (‘Green River’) had not made double figures for weeks, falling just short with 9. The peak of 5 for ‘Travellin’ Band’ equalled the Creedence’s lowest to date which was also experienced by ‘Green River’.

We welcomed our first Kenyan artist to the charts this week as Roger Whittaker’s ‘I Don’t Believe In If Anymore’ was the first of the 3 new entries. Whittaker, who was born in Nairobi on 22 March 1936, has had 8 UK hits to date, one of which was ‘I Don’t Believe In If Anymore’ which went to number 8, his second best peak, there. He would also have a number 31 hit with ‘Mammy Blue’ which would be a huge SA hit for Charisma.

People who loved listening to the voice of Tony Burrows would have been upset with the departure of the White Plains hit from the chart this week, but they could take comfort from the fact that that the voice behind The Ivy League’s and White Plains’ hits we had seen on our charts was still to be heard in the top 20 as The Pipkins’ ‘Gimme Dat Ding’, our second new entry, featured the same man singing. Roger Greenaway, who had song writing credits on 7 songs to chart so far, helped out on the vocals, but not on the song writing as that was done by Albert Hammond and Mike Hazelwood giving the pair their 3rd SA chart hit each as song writers. ‘Gimme Dat Ding’ would go to number 6 in the UK and 9 in the US.

The final new entry was the 4th song by a Dutch act to chart and came in the form of The George Baker Selection’s ‘Little Green Bag’. The song was written by Jan Visser and Hans Bouwens (George Baker’s birth name) and would give them a number 9 hit in their native Holland. Elsewhere it would make it to 21 in the US, 3 in Belgium and 8 in the then Rhodesia. The song was actually meant to be titled ‘Little Greenback’, referring to a dollar bill, but somehow ended up with the label being printed as ‘Little Green Bag’ and the name stuck. In 1992 the song had some renewed exposure as it was included in the soundtrack to Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Reservoir Dogs’ and, after featuring in an advert for whiskey in Japan, made it to number 1 there.

The arrival of Roger Whittaker on the charts meant we had a new record to date 7 different nations represented in the top 20 as the Kenyan joined acts from the UK, the US, SA, The Netherlands, Germany and Jamaica in our charts. It should also be noted that this week saw the lowest number of songs by American acts on the charts since 15 December 1967 as we now only had 4 Yanks represented in the top 20.

Percy Sledge shook off Donovan and Elvis Presley on the weeks count list, his 71 weeks to date putting him in 12th place on his own. On the local front, Dave Mills moved 1 week ahead of Murray Campbell to give him 6th place to himself. He sat on 34 weeks. Al Debbo moved onto 23 weeks and this placed him tied 11th with Dickie Loader.

On the points front, we saw 4 acts pass milestones. Dave Mills moved past 500, Percy Sledge crossed the 700 threshold, Chris Andrews moved into the 800s while Tom Jones, who led the way for points, now had in excess of 1,800. Mills sat 3rd for a local act behind The Staccatos on 814 and Four Jacks and a Jill on 837.

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