1967 The Facts And Figures

single_giel_sandy_posey

We have now come to the end of the 2nd full year of charts and were two and a half years into them in total. Once again it is time to take stock of the year that we have just gone through and see who the shakers and movers were back in 1967.

There were 146 songs that spent at least 1 week on the charts this year (127 were new to the charts and 19 brought forward from 1966). We were up 10 on the number of hits seen in 1966. The 146 songs were brought to us by 98 different artists (artist charting as part of a duet or collaboration are counted separately). To date the hits count looked like this:

Year No Of Hits
1965 (30 weeks) 79
1966 136
1967 146

23 of the hits were by local acts and 18 artists accounted for these. This was down on 1966 were we saw 30 local hits spend time in the charts.

TOP HITS

Based on a points system of 20 points for a number 1 position, 19 for number 2 etc down to 1 for position 20, the following are the top 40 chart performers for the year (Note: this does not reflect sales):

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
2 Silence is Golden Tremeloes 259
3 Green Green Grass of Home Tom Jones 241
=4 The French Song Lucille Starr 223
=4 The Last Waltz Engelbert Humperdinck 223
6 Release Me Engelbert Humperdinck 209
7 Puppet on a String Sandie Shaw 207
8 I’m a Believer Monkees 205
9 Ramblin’ Boy Des Lindberg 204
10 Dedicated to the One I Love Mamas and The Papas 198
11 Timothy Four Jacks & a Jill 196
12 Give it to Me Troggs 195
13 This is My Song Petula Clark 187
14 There’s a Kind of Hush New Vaudeville Band 177
15 I was Kaiser Bill’s Batman Whistling Jack Smith 173
16 Let’s Live for Today Grass Roots 169
17 That’s My Desire Hollies 168
18 Cry Softly (Liebestraum) Nancy Ames 167
=19 Ha Ha Said the Clown Manfred Mann 166
=19 Even the Bad Times are Good Tremeloes 166
21 Silence is Golden Square Set 163
22 Die Ou Kraalliedjie Groep Twee 161
23 Mathew and Son Cat Stevens 152
24 I Take it Back Sandy Posey 151
25 A Whiter Shade of Pale Procol Harum 150
26 Timothy Carike Keuzenkamp 149
27 Then I Kissed Her Beach Boys 147
28 Carrie-Anne Hollies 143
=29 There Goes My Everything Engelbert Humperdinck 141
=29 I Love You Lucille Starr 141
31 Good Vibrations Beach Boys 136
32 Ruby Tuesday Rolling Stones 133
33 Yamao Toko No Uta New Christy Minstrels 132
=34 Something Stupid Nancy and Frank Sinatra 131
=34 Tabatha Twitchit Dominos 131
=36 Remember When Max Bygraves 130
=36 She’d Rather be with Me Turtles 130
38 Massachusetts Bee Gees 127
=39 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again Tom Jones 121
=39 There is a Mountain Donovan 121

You can compare this to the list published in Top 40 magazine in 1989 which can be found here:

Top 40 Magazine 1967 List

The cumulative points to date gave the following top 10:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Sweet Pea Tommy Roe 307
2 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
3 Green Green Grass Of Home Tom Jones 289
4 California Girls Beach Boys 286
5 Silence Is Golden Tremeloes 259
6 Ramblin’ Boy Des Lindberg 251
7 Lara’s Theme (From Dr Zhivago) Roger Williams 238
8 Goodbye My Love Murray Campbell 235
=9 Cry Softly (Liebestraum) Nancy Ames 232
=9 With A Girl Like You Troggs 232

The top songs pointswise on the local front for 1967 were as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Ramblin’ Boy Des Lindberg 204
2 Timothy Four Jacks & a Jill 196
3 Silence is Golden Square Set 163
4 Die Ou Kraalliedjie Groep Twee 161
5 Timothy Carike Keuzenkamp 149

And cumulatively from the start of the charts in 1965:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Ramblin’ Boy Des Lindberg 251
2 Goodbye My Love Murray Campbell 235
3 Timothy Four Jacks & A Jill 196
4 Hungry For Love A-Cads 183
5 Come Back Silly Girl Staccatos 180

NUMBER OF HITS

Five acts managed to spend at least 1 week on the chart with 4 different hits and they were Tom Jones, Jim Reeves, The Monkees, Nancy Sinatra and Petula Clark. 11 acts had 3 hits, 19 acts had 2 while the rest all had 1. So far no act had managed more than 4 in a year. The Rolling Stones had managed 4 in 1965 and 1966, but only managed 1 this year.

To date Tom Jones led the way with 8 hits. Cliff Richard, Petula Clark, The Seekers, The Rolling Stones and The Hollies all had 7 to their names.

The Dream Merchants, The Staccatos, Four Jacks & A Jill, Gene Rockwell, Virginia Lee and The Square Set were the local acts who managed 2 hits in 1967, no local act managed more. Gene Rockwell and Virginia Lee led the way on the cumulative list with 6 each. Four Jacks & A Jill were the next best with 4 to their name.

WEEKS ON THE CHART

There was a 3 way tie for most weeks on the chart during 1967 as Tom Jones, Petula Clark and Engelbert Humperdinck all enjoyed 37 weeks in the top 20 (2 in the charts in the same week counts as 2). The Monkees, Sandy Posey and Lucille Starr had the next highest weeks count as they all managed 32.

To date, The Beach Boys 39 in 1966 was the best in a year followed by The Rolling Stones 38 they managed in the 30 weeks of 1965.

The Square Sets’ 18 weeks in 1967 put them top on the local front. They were followed by Groep Twee on 15 and Des Lindberg on 14.

Gene Rockwell had a cumulative total of 39 which was the highest local count to date. Virginia Lee was 2nd on 36 with Murray Campbell on 33 coming in 3rd. Campbell scored 30 of his 33 in 1965 and this was the best a local act had managed in 1 year to date with The Square Set’s 18 above and Four Jacks & A Jill’s 18 in 1966 being second best in a year.

NUMBER 1’s

As with 1966 we saw 18 songs top the charts, but unlike the previous year we had 1 act have more than 1 number 1 and that was Engelbert Humperdinck who got to the top with ‘Release Me’ and ‘The Last Waltz’. Elvis Presley, Tom Jones and The Rolling Stones were the only other acts so far to manage 2 chart toppers in a year and they all did this in 1965.

There were only 2 local chart toppers and they were both ‘Timothy’. Four Jacks & A Jill’s version spending 2 weeks at the top and Carike Keuzenkamp’s spending 1 week.

The Tremeloes’ 7 weeks at 1 with ‘Silence Is Golden’ was not only the best for a song in the year, but was also the best to date. Murray Campbell’s 6 non-consecutive weeks at 1 was the best a local song had managed. Des Lindberg’s ‘Ramblin’ Boy’ equalled ‘Goodbye My Love’ for consecutive weeks at 1 by a local song as it managed 3 in a row.

In terms of total count for chart toppers, both The Rolling Stones and Tom Jones had managed 3 to date with The Beach Boys, Elvis Presley, Engelbert Humperdinck, Frank Sinatra and Nancy Sinatra managing 2 (1 of those for Frank and Nancy Sinatra was their duet).

Tom Jones headed the list for total weeks spent at 1 as he had clocked up 10 to date. The Beach Boys, Engelbert Humperdinck and The Tremeloes were second on 6.

FEMALE ACTS

It was the best year to date for the female artists as we saw 27 hits by women (4 of which were as part of a duet) make the top 20. This almost doubled the 14 we saw in 1966 and was nearly 4 times more than the 7 in 1965.

Petula Clark brought us 4 hits, the highest total for a woman this year. Lucille Starr and Nancy Sinatra managed 3 each although 2 of Nancy’s were as part of a duet. Virginia Lee was the only local woman to manage 2. Carike Kezenkamp, June Muscat, Judy Page and Glenys Lynne were the only other local woman to chart (Lynne as part of a duet with Jody Wayne).

Petula Clark’s 37 weeks in the charts was not only the best a woman managed, but as mentioned above, shared the best for any artist. This smashed the 24 weeks record for a year that Nancy Sinatra had managed in 1966. Lucille Starr and Sandy Posey were second with 32 weeks each.

Cumulatively Petula also led the way as she had 58 to her name. Nancy Sinatra on 48 and Virginia Lee on 36 were second and third. Lee was the highest placed local woman with June Muscat on 12 second and Carike Keuzenkamp on 10 was third.

1965 and 1966 saw only 1 female chart topper each. This year we saw that number jump up dramatically to 4 with Sandy Posey’s ‘Single Girl’, Petula Clark’s ‘This Is My Song’, Sandie Shaw’s ‘Puppet On A String’ and Carike Keuzenkamp’s ‘Timothy’ all cracking the top spot. The 5 weeks that Sandy Posey’s ‘Single Girl’ spent at the top was the best any hit by a woman had managed. This was done in a run of 4 weeks on, 1 week off then 1 week on. Nancy Sinatra’s ‘These Boots Are Made For Walking’ was the only other by a woman to have a 4 weeks consecutive run at the top.

The top 5 hits by woman in 1967 based on the points system were:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
2 The French Song Lucille Starr 223
3 Puppet on a String Sandie Shaw 207
4 This is My Song Petula Clark 187
5 Cry Softly (Liebestraum) Nancy Ames 167

On a cumulative basis, the top 5 read:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
2 Cry Softly (Liebestraum) Nancy Ames 232
3 The French Song Lucille Starr 223
4 Puppet on a String Sandie Shaw 207
=5 This is My Song Petula Clark 187
=5 These Boots Are Made For Walking Nancy Sinatra 187

REST OF THE WORLD

Aside from artists from the UK and US (who tend to dominate most charts worldwide), and local acts the following are the top hits from other nationalities:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 The French Song Lucille Starr 223 Canada
2 I Love You Lucille Starr 141 Canada
3 Morningtown Ride Seekers 84 Australia
4 Georgy Girl Seekers 50 Australia
5 When Will the Good Apples Fall Seekers 38 Australia

In total there were 8 songs by artists who were not from the UK, the US or SA that spent time in the top 20 this year. There were 3 from Canada (all by Lucille Starr) and 3 from Australia (all by The Seekers) while the French chipped in with 2 (1 by Francoise Hardy and 1 by the duet of Nicole Croisille and Pierre Barouh).

The cumulative best hits for ‘rest of the world’ artists was as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 The French Song Lucille Starr 223 Canada
2 World Of Our Own Seekers 192 Australia
3 The Carnival Is Over Seekers 160 Australia
4 I Love You Lucille Starr 141 Canada
5 Black Is Black Los Bravos 117 Spain

So far we had seen 7 hits from Australians (all The Seekers), 3 each from Canada (all Lucille Starr) and 3 from France. Germany Ireland, Italy and Spain had all chipped in with 1 each.

WHAT DIDN’T CHART

There were 10 songs that topped either the UK or US charts (or both) that did not make our top 20 this year. One of these, Long John Baldy’s ‘Let The Heartaches Begin’, would eventually chart in SA.

All You Need Is Love Beatles
Hello Goodbye Beatles
Incense And Peppermints Strawberry Alarm Clock
Let The Heartaches Begin Long John Baldry
Love Is Here And Now You’re Gone Supremes
Penny Lane Beatles
Respect Aretha Franklin
San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Some Flowers In Your Hair) Scott Mckenzie
The Happening Supremes
To Sir With Love Lulu

CHARTING IN CONSECUTIVE YEARS

There were 15 acts that had spent at least 1 week in the charts in 1965, 1966 and 1967. Gene Rockwell, The Staccatos and Virginia Lee were the 3 local acts who had managed this and along with Virginia Lee, Petula Clark was the only other woman to achieve this. The list of all acts which had charted every year so far is as follows:

Beach Boys, Cliff Richard, Donovan, Gene Rockwell, Herman’s Hermits, Hollies, Kinks, Manfred Mann, Matt Monro, Petula Clark, Rolling Stones, Seekers, Staccatos, Tom Jones, Virginia Lee

There were 206 different song writers who had their names appear on the labels of the songs that spent time in the charts this year. Les Reed was the most successful of these this year as he had 6 of his compositions chart. Geoff Stephens was second with 5 and Barry Gibb and Barry Mason’s names appeared 4 times each.I WRITE THE SONGS

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards only added 1 to their cumulative total during 1967. They still sat at the top of the cumulative list, but they were joined by Les Reed as all 3 now had 8 to their names. John Lennon and Paul McCartney did not add to their tally, but still had the second highest with 6. Tom Springfield had 2 more to his name this year, so he sat tied with the 2 Beatles’ memebrs.

Unsurprisingly Les Reed took top honours for weeks on the chart as his compositions racked up 51 which was 5 more than last year’s top writer, Paul Simon who managed 46 in 1966. Geoff Stephens was second in1967 with 41 weeks and Barry Mason 3rd with 29.

Les Reed had just edged past the 2 chaps from The Rolling Stones for total weeks to date as he had accumulated 74 to Jagger & Richards’ 73. Brian Wilson was next highest with 66.

The only song writer to see 2 of his compositions top the charts in 1967 was Kobus ‘Dopper’ Erasmus as Carike Keuzenkamp and Four Jacks & A Jill’s version of ‘Timothy’ which he wrote, managed to get to number 1.

To date 7 song writers had seen 2 of their songs top the charts and we had also seen 2 ‘Traditional’ songs get to number 1. No song writer had yet managed 3.

Maurice Jarre still led the way for weeks spent at 1 by their compositions having enjoyed a total of 8 weeks at the top with The Ray Coniff Singers and Roger Williams’ version of ‘Lara Theme’. All the ‘B’s, Brian Wilson, Bob Gaudio and Bob Crewe sat second with 7 weeks each.

THANKS

Finally, I would like to thank all those who have helped by noting corrections etc as we have gone through 1967. Special thanks go to Peet van Staaden and Ian McLean for supplying invaluable information.

And so on to 1968.

29 December 1967

bee-gees_massachusetts

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Massachusetts  – Bee Gees
2 3 7 Come Back When You Grow Up  – Bobby Vee
3 2 11 Timothy  – Four Jacks & a Jill
4 4 9 The Letter  – Box Tops
5 7 6 You’ve Not Changed  – Sandie Shaw
6 5 10 Timothy  – Carike Keuzenkamp
7 8 3 I’m Coming Home  – Tom Jones
8 6 13 The Last Waltz  – Engelbert Humperdinck
9 9 3 All My Love  – Cliff Richard
10 11 3 Daydream Believer  – Monkees
11 13 4 Baby Now That I’ve Found You  – Foundations
12 15 4 Soul Finger  – Bar-Kays
13 10 10 There is a Mountain  – Donovan
14 20 2 Never My Love  – Association
15 12 5 Shock Wave  – Invaders
16 RE 2 Zabadak  – Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich
17 14 15 Even the Bad Times are Good  – Tremeloes
18 19 2 Wish Me a Rainbow  – Virginia Lee
19 17 12 I Love You  – Lucille Starr
20 16 7 I Heard a Heart Break Last Night  – Jim Reeves

1967 closed with the Bee Gees still sitting at the number 1 spot as ‘Massachusetts’ clocked up its 4th week there. Bobby Vee moved into second place with ‘Come Back When You Grow Up’ climbing 1 place from 3. For the first time in 6 weeks we only had 1 version of ‘Timothy’ in the top 5 as Carike Keuzenkamp’s one fell to number 6. The Four Jacks & A Jill version was at 3.

The Association’s only other hit to date, ‘Windy’, had never made biggest climber, but they now managed it with current hit, ‘Never My Love’ which moved up 6 places from 14 to 20. To date just under 57% of biggest climbers had, like ‘Never My Love’, achieved this in their 2nd week on the chart.

The next biggest climb after the 6 places The Association managed, was a mere 3 places, so there were no other star raters this week.

Jim Reeves heard a heart break last night and it may have been his own as his song picked up the faller of the week award. It dropped 4 from 16 to 20 and was his 4th time with this award.

The Tremeloes enjoyed their 9th week in total with an oldest song in the charts. ‘Silence Is Golden’ had clocked up 4 of the 9 and ‘Even The Bad Times Are Good’ had now gone 1 better and was enjoying its 5th week as the oldest. It sat on 15 weeks in the top 20. There were 5 other acts that were in double figures for weeks on the chart.

The Square Set who began their SA chart career on 7 July 1967 would not see any chart action outside of this year as their second hit, ‘Carol Corina’, dropped off the charts this week. It had been with us for 5 weeks and peaked at 15. This ended their SA chart run with 2 hits to their name, a total of 18 weeks and a best peak of 3 with their aforementioned 1st hit.

Despite losing 1 song this week, there were no new entries but, before you get confused, there was a re-entry and that was Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich’s ‘Zabadak’. It became the 8th song to re-appear in the top 20 after departing and had been absent from the chart for just 1 week.

2 acts celebrated their 30th week in the charts and these were The Tremeloes and Four Jacks & A Jill. In total 29 acts had reached this milestone so far, but Four Jacks & A Jill were only the 5th local act to do so. Jim Reeves moved into 10th place on the weeks count list alongside Nancy Sinatra. They were on 48 weeks. Donovan’s 43rd week in the chart moved him into tied 12th place with Tommy Roe. On the local list, Carike Keuzenkamp moved tied 17th with The Dominos and John E Sharp & The Squires on 10 weeks.

Our top 20 this week had more in common with the UK charts than those in the US as 8 of the top 20 songs listed above appeared on the UK top 50 for the same week while only 4 were in the US Hot 100. However local acts had a greater presence in the US as Hugh Masakela’s ‘Up Up And Away’ sat at 74 in the US Hot 100 this last week of 1967.

Youtube playlist:

22 December 1967

bee-gees_massachusetts

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 Massachusetts  – Bee Gees
2 2 10 Timothy  – Four Jacks & a Jill
3 3 6 Come Back When You Grow Up  – Bobby Vee
4 5 8 The Letter  – Box Tops
5 4 9 Timothy  – Carike Keuzenkamp
6 7 12 The Last Waltz  – Engelbert Humperdinck
7 8 5 You’ve Not Changed  – Sandie Shaw
8 19 2 I’m Coming Home  – Tom Jones
9 17 2 All My Love  – Cliff Richard
10 6 9 There is a Mountain  – Donovan
11 18 2 Daydream Believer  – Monkees
12 10 4 Shock Wave  – Invaders
13 14 3 Baby Now That I’ve Found You  – Foundations
14 11 14 Even the Bad Times are Good  – Tremeloes
15 RE 3 Soul Finger  – Bar-Kays
16 16 6 I Heard a Heart Break Last Night  – Jim Reeves
17 9 11 I Love You  – Lucille Starr
18 15 5 Carol Corina  – Square Set
19 New 1 Wish Me a Rainbow  – Virginia Lee
20 New 1 Never My Love  – Association

‘Massachusetts’ by The Bee Gees enjoyed its 3rd week at the top of our chart, seeing off the challenge of Four Jacks & A Jill’s version of ‘Timothy’ which sat at number 2 for a second week and was looking to regain the number 1 spot.

Tom Jones pulled clear of the 3 other acts who were on 6 biggest climbers as he clocked up his 7th with an 11 place jump from 19 to 8 with ‘I’m Coming Home’. This left The Seekers, The Beach Boys and Nancy Sinatra behind on 6. This was only the 6th time a song had managed an 11 or more place climb and only 1 of the other 5 had been 11 places, with the rest being bigger climbs.

Cliff Richard’s ‘All My Love’ picked up a 3rd star rater climb for him as it moved up 8 from 17 to 9 while a 7 place climb for The Monkees’ ‘Daydream Believer’ gave them their 5th. This week ranked tied 5th for net movement up (i.e. add up the total of the moves up and down for all songs on the top 20) as this totalled 9. The best to date was 21 July 1967 where the net upward movement totalled 15.

The biggest faller went to Lucille Starr’s ‘I Love You’ which dropped 8 places from 9 to 17 (a falling starr you may say). Starr was the 10th woman to have a biggest faller and ‘I Love You’ was the 20th song by a woman (including those that were duets with men, of which there were 5) to take this award.

The Tremeloes ‘Even The Bad Times Are Good’ continued as the oldest on the charts, it was on14 weeks and had been the oldest for 4 of them.

Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich’s ‘Zabadak’ spent just 1 week in the charts at number 20. This was the 7th song to have a chart run of 1 week at the bottom of the top 20. Of the 6 previous songs to have such a chart run, 1 had managed to re-enter the charts.

The Seekers’ ‘When Will The Good Apples Fall’ equalled their previous highest place for a last week which ‘Morningtown Ride’ managed as it left the charts after sitting at number 13 last week. ‘When Will The Good Apples Fall’ had been with us for 6 weeks and peaked at 12. It was their first song not to go top 10 since ‘I’ll Never Find Another You’ which spent just 1 week at 16, but that was on the very first chart.

While The Seekers were equalling their highest last week position, Ian & Ritchie were setting new heights for the last week position for a local song as their ‘Look Across The River’ left the chart from number 12. Three local songs previously held the record having finished their chart runs at number 13. ‘Look Across The River’ spent 7 weeks on the charts and peaked at 8. It would be the duo’s only SA chart hit.

The Bar-Kays’ ‘Soul Finger’ became the 7th song to re-enter the charts after falling off them and it did so at the second highest position to date for a re-entry, arriving back at 15. Only Matt Monro’s ‘Wednesday’s Child’, which re-entered at 14 had returned at a higher position.

Gene Rockwell’s time alone at the top of the list of number of hits by a local artist lasted just 3 weeks as this week Virginia Lee drew level with him again as her hit ‘Wish Me A Rainbow’ entered the charts. The song was originally recorded by Mary Badham and was included in the soundtrack to the 1966 film ‘This Property Is Condemned’ which starred Natalie Wood, Robert Redford and Charles Bronson. The song has been recorded by a number of different artists including Astrud Gilberto and Patti Page. With this hit Lee also drew level with Nancy Sinatra for number of top 20 hits and together they sat 1 behind Petula Clark who led the way for women. Petula on 7 was tied second on the overall list.

The final new entry was ‘Never My Love’, a 2nd SA hit for The Association. The song written by Dick & Don Adrissi and The Associations version would be the most successful recording of it as it went to number 2 in the US (number 1 on the alternate US chart produced by Cashbox Magazine). It was kept off the top spot by The Box Tops’ ‘The Letter’ (our number 4 hit this week).The song has also been covered by a variety of artists with some making the US charts  – The Sandpebbles #98 in 1968, 5th Dimension #12 inn 1971 and Blue Swede #7 in 1974. The Adrissi Brothers own version which they eventually recorded in 1977, made it to number 80. The song did not really make it across the Atlantic though as the only version to chart there was reggae artist Sugar Minott’s version which made it to number 52 in 1981.

Donovan moved into tied 13th place on the weeks count list. He joined The Beatles and The Mamas & The Papas on 42 weeks. The Monkees moved on to 33 weeks and crept into the top 20 of that list, joining local lad Murray Campbell there. On the local front, Viginia Lee’s new entry was not enough to move her up the weeks count list as she sat 2nd but was still 4 weeks behind leader Gene Rockwell. Four Jacks & A Jill went to 5 (well that is 4 Jacks plus 1 Jill) where they were level with The Staccatos on 29. The Square Set moved tied 7th with Jody Wayne on 18 while Carike Keuzenkamp’s 9 weeks with ‘Timothy’ put her in the local top 20 list, sharing 19th spot with Judy Page and Theo Cavalieros.

Youtube playlist:

15 December 1967

bee-gees_massachusetts

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Massachusetts  – Bee Gees
2 3 9 Timothy  – Four Jacks & a Jill
3 6 5 Come Back When You Grow Up  – Bobby Vee
4 2 8 Timothy  – Carike Keuzenkamp
5 5 7 The Letter  – Box Tops
6 4 8 There is a Mountain  – Donovan
7 7 11 The Last Waltz  – Engelbert Humperdinck
8 13 4 You’ve Not Changed  – Sandie Shaw
9 8 10 I Love You  – Lucille Starr
10 17 3 Shock Wave  – Invaders
11 10 13 Even the Bad Times are Good  – Tremeloes
12 9 7 Look Across the River  – Ian and Ritchie
13 12 6 When Will the Good Apples Fall  – Seekers
14 19 2 Baby Now That I’ve Found You  – Foundations
15 16 4 Carol Corina  – Square Set
16 11 5 I Heard a Heart Break Last Night  – Jim Reeves
17 New 1 All My Love  – Cliff Richard
18 New 1 Daydream Believer  – Monkees
19 New 1 I’m Coming Home  – Tom Jones
20 New 1 Zabadak  – Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich

The number 1 hit was in a state this week, the state of ‘Massachusetts’ by The Bee Gees, and it was enjoying its 2nd week there. The Four Jacks & A Jill’s version of ‘Timothy’, a previous chart topper, was edging its way back to the top, climbing 1 to land at number 2. Carike Keuzenkamp’s version was heading in the opposite direction as it dropped 2 to 4.

With 2 local acts in the top 5, we also had the joy of seeing the biggest climber award coming from within our borders as it was The Invaders’ ‘Shockwave’ that took the honours this week, climbing 7 from 17 to 10. This meant that 6 out of the 12 instrumentals to chart so far had managed to take a biggest climber award at least once.

Sandie Shaw’s ‘You’ve Not Changed’ was the only other star rater this week as it moved up 5 to 8. Shaw was now 3rd on her own for number of star raters by a woman, pulling 1 clear of Virginia Lee, but she was 4 behind 2nd placed Petula Clark and 5 behind leader, Nancy Sinatra.

The biggest faller was Jim Reeves’ ‘I Heard A Heart Break Last Night’ which fell 5 from 11 to 16. This was his 3rd time with the award.

The Tremeloes’ ‘Even The Bad Times Are Good’ enjoyed its 3rd week as the oldest on the charts. It had now been with us for 13 weeks.

Gene Rockwell recorded his worst chart performance to date as ‘Cold Cold Heart’ lasted just 2 weeks with us, both of which were spent at number 20. This was the 6th song to have a chart record like this and the 2nd local one after The Dream Merchant’s ‘Rattler’.

The Bar-Kays didn’t fare much better as their hit ‘Soul Finger’ had also only been with us for 2 weeks, but it did manage to get to 18 during that time.

Contrary to the song’s title, Petula Clark’s chart run with ‘Eternally’ only lasted 9 weeks, the song peaking at 7 during that time. Like Gene Rockwell, however, we were not done with Clark in the charts.

Last to go was The Doors’ ‘Light My Fire’ which burnt for 5 weeks on the top 20 and peaked at 13. They too would return to the top 20.

Cliff Richard would have been forgiven for thinking he was joining the leaders on the hits count list as his 7th song to date, ‘All My Love’ entered the charts at 17. Last week this would have been good enough to join the leaders, however Tom Jones had other ideas as he clocked up his 8th this week. More on Jones’ below. Cliff’s new one was an English version of an Italian song called ‘Solo Tu’ which was first recorded by Orietta Berti in 1967. Peter Callander who had song writing credits on The Tremeloes hit mentioned above as being the oldest, supplied the English lyrics to clock up his 2nd hit on our charts as a song writer. Cliff’s recording of it would give him a number 6 hit in the UK. It was his 43rd UK hit there and the 35th to go top 10 there.

The Monkees climbed into the charts with their 4th hit to date, ‘Daydream Believer’. The song was written by John Stewart from The Kingston Trio and it would give The Monkees the last of their 3 US chart toppers. It would account for 4 of the 12 weeks in total that the band would occupy pole position in the States. The song would also top the Irish and Rhodesian charts and go top 10 in Australia (#2), Austria (#7), Belgium Flanders (#8), Germany (#4), Japan (#4), Norway (#2), Swizterland (#10) and The UK (#5). In 1980 a cover by Anne Murray would go to 12 in the US, 17 in her native Canada and 61 in the UK.

As mentioned above, Tom Jones became the first act to reach 8 hits. His new one, ‘I’m Coming Home’ was the 5th song written by the song writing duo of Les Reed and Barry Mason to chart, so not only did Jones move to the top of the hits count list, but Reed also moved to the top of the hits by a song writer list as his 8 to date (he had 3 others chart where he was not partnered with Mason) equalled the total accumulated by The Stones’ Jagger & Richards. Of Reed’s 8 compositions, only 1 of the previous 7 had been a Tom Jones hit and that was ‘It’s Not Unusual’. The song would be Jones’ 12th UK hit where it managed to get to number 2. In the US it would falter at number 57.

Our final new entry was the first song beginning with the letter ‘Z’ to chart and that was Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Titch’s ‘Zabadak’. There would only be 4 songs in total starting with ‘Z’ to chart. The song was the band’s 4th hit to make our top 20. ‘Zabadak’ would be the band’s 8th UK hit and the 6th to go top 10 as it made it to number 3. Elsewhere it would top the Canadian charts, go to 2 in Australia, 3 in Holland and 4 in Rhodesia. British band The Sorrows who had had an SA hit with ‘Take A Heart’ back in 1967, recorded an Italian cover of the song calling it ‘La Liberta Costa Cara’.

We had a new leader on the weeks count list as Tom Jones edged 1 ahead of The Rolling Stones. He was now on 83 weeks. The Stones had been at the top of the list since the very first chart back in June 1966, sharing the top spot with Cliff Richard for 1 week, Herman’s Hermits for 2 and Tom Jones for 4. Despite falling down the charts, Lucille Starr could smile about clocking up her 30th. She sat 6th highest for weeks by a woman (27th overall). Cliff Richard and Engelbert Humperdinck pulled 1 week clear of Virginia Lee, but their 35 to date could not move them up the hits count list as they remained at 17. The Square Set joined The Bats and The Dream Merchants in 8th place on the local list. They all had 17 weeks to their names.

Youtube playlist:

8 December 1967

bee-gees_massachusetts

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 5 Massachusetts  – Bee Gees
2 1 7 Timothy  – Carike Keuzenkamp
3 3 8 Timothy  – Four Jacks & a Jill
4 4 7 There is a Mountain  – Donovan
5 6 6 The Letter  – Box Tops
6 9 4 Come Back When You Grow Up  – Bobby Vee
7 5 10 The Last Waltz  – Engelbert Humperdinck
8 7 9 I Love You  – Lucille Starr
9 8 6 Look Across the River  – Ian and Ritchie
10 10 12 Even the Bad Times are Good  – Tremeloes
11 12 4 I Heard a Heart Break Last Night  – Jim Reeves
12 14 5 When Will the Good Apples Fall  – Seekers
13 16 3 You’ve Not Changed  – Sandie Shaw
14 13 5 Light My Fire  – Doors
15 11 9 Eternally  – Petula Clark
16 15 3 Carol Corina  – Square Set
17 18 2 Shock Wave  – Invaders
18 19 2 Soul Finger  – Bar-Kays
19 New 1 Baby Now That I’ve Found You  – Foundations
20 20 2 Cold Cold Heart  – Gene Rockwell

The 3 week run that ‘Timothy’ had at 1 (2 weeks with Four Jacks & A Jill’s version and 1 week with Carike Keuzenkamp’s) ended this week as The Bee Gees’ ‘Massachusetts’ became the 50th song to top our chart. We had had 23 number 1s by UK acts, 21 by US acts, 5 by local acts and 1 by an Aussie act. 25 of them had been by groups, 18 by solo males, 6 by solo females and 1 by a duet. The 2 ‘Timothy’s sat at 2 (Carike) and 3 (Four Jacks).

Bobby Vee’s ‘Come Back When You Grow Up’ gave him his first biggest climber award as it moved up 3 places from 9 to 6. It was joined in this small biggest climb by Sandie Shaw’s ‘You’ve Not Changed’ which climbed 3 from 16 to 13. This would be her 3rd biggest climber.

With the biggest climb being just 3 places, there were no star raters this week.

The faller award went to Petula Clark’s ‘Eternally’ which dropped 4 from 11 to 15. This was her 5th biggest faller to date and this placed her tied second for number of biggest fallers, equalling Herman’s Hermits and sitting 1 behind The Rolling Stones’ 6.

The Tremeloes’ ‘Even The Bad Times Are Good’ was still with us this week, so it enjoyed its second week as the oldest on the charts. Combined with the 4 weeks that ‘Silence Is Golden’ had been the oldest, this was the band’s 6th week in total with an oldest in the charts.

There was just 1 song that left the charts this week and that was The Dominos’ ‘Tabatha Twitchit’. It had been with us for 10 weeks and peaked at 3 during that time. This would be the band’s only SA chart offering. In terms of points (20 for a week at 1, 19 for a week at 2 etc), this was the 11th best performing local song to date clocking up 131 points. Des Lindberg’s ‘Ramlin’ Boy’ led the way on that list with 251 points.

The new entry was an SA chart debut for The Foundations as well as being the debut for the song writers Tony Macauley and John MacLeod. ‘Baby Now That I’ve Found You’ would give the band a UK number 1 where it knocked our current number 1 from the top spot there and went on to spend 2 weeks at the top of the charts there. It would also top the charts in Canada, get to 11 in The US, 6 in Norway and Rhodesia, 8 in Holland, 12 in Belgium and 33 in Germany. In 2002 Lauren Waterworth, a 13 years old signed by Pete Waterman of Stock, Aitken & Waterman fame, took a cover of the song to 24 in the UK.

Donovan reached the 40 weeks in the chart milestone while Sandie Shaw was 10 weeks behind him, celebrating her 30th. Donovan sat 15th on the weeks count list while Shaw was 26th and the 5th highest woman. Engelbert Humperdinck moved into tied 17th place with 34 weeks to his name. He shared that spot with Cliff Richard and Virginia Lee.

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1 December 1967

timothy_carika

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 6 Timothy  – Carike Keuzenkamp
2 4 4 Massachusetts  – Bee Gees
3 1 7 Timothy  – Four Jacks & a Jill
4 5 6 There is a Mountain  – Donovan
5 3 9 The Last Waltz  – Engelbert Humperdinck
6 8 5 The Letter  – Box Tops
7 6 8 I Love You  – Lucille Starr
8 9 5 Look Across the River  – Ian and Ritchie
9 12 3 Come Back When You Grow Up  – Bobby Vee
10 10 11 Even the Bad Times are Good  – Tremeloes
11 7 8 Eternally  – Petula Clark
12 18 3 I Heard a Heart Break Last Night  – Jim Reeves
13 15 4 Light My Fire  – Doors
14 17 4 When Will the Good Apples Fall  – Seekers
15 20 2 Carol Corina  – Square Set
16 19 2 You’ve Not Changed  – Sandie Shaw
17 11 10 Tabatha Twitchit  – Dominos
18 New 1 Shock Wave  – Invaders
19 New 1 Soul Finger  – Bar-Kays
20 New 1 Cold Cold Heart  – Gene Rockwell

‘Timothy’ took over from ‘Timothy’ at the top of our charts this week. That is Carike Keuzenkamp’s version of the song took over from the Four Jacks & A Jill’s one, the latter falling to number 3. The Bee Gees’ ‘Massachusetts’ moved up 2 to 2 to separate the 2 ‘Timothy’s.

Jim Reeves became the 12th act to pick up 5 biggest climbers as ‘I Heard a Heart Break Last Night’ took the award this week by climbing up 6 places from 18 to 12. 4 of the 12 acts had gone on to have a 6th biggest climber, but none had managed 7 yet.

The Square Set’s ‘Carol Corina’ was the only other star rater this week. It moved up 5 places to 15 to account for the band’s 3rd star rater climb.

Last week’s biggest faller, The Domino’s ‘Tabatha Twitchit’, took the award again this week once again falling 6 places. This week it fell to 17.

Nancy Sinatra’s ‘Lightning’s Girl’ had been on the charts for 6 weeks, but this week she did not strike the top 20. The song had managed to peak at 10 during its time with us. Nancy would be back.

Anita Harris’ ‘Just Loving You’ suffered the same fate, leaving the charts after 8 weeks and a peak of 7. For Anita though, this would be her only showing on the top 20.

The last to go was The Hollies’ ‘That’s My Desire’. The song had managed to spend 1 more week on the charts than their ‘Carrie-Anne’ which it had shared the charts with for 8 of the 11 weeks it was on the top 20. It had enjoyed a 3 week stay at the top of the charts and was the bands only chart topper to date. It did, however only rank second for The Hollies for weeks on the chart, beaten by the 12 weeks ‘I’m Alive’ managed.

Local band The Invaders brought us the first of the 3 new entries this week. Their debut on the charts was ‘Shockwave’. The song was the 12th instrumental to grace our charts and the second by a local group (the first being Boet van Wyk Orkes’ ‘Oliekolonie’). Although the song was their 1st SA chart hit, it was in fact their 7th single to be released and the song name would also be the title of their second album. They managed to get a gold disc for the sales of this song.

The second new entry was The Bar-Kay’s ‘Soul Finger’. This was their debut single and it took them to number 33 on the US Hot 100 and 17 on the charts in the UK. Dan Ackroyd and John Belushi covered the song as The Blues Brothers and later a film in which Ackroyd starred with Chevy Chase, ‘Spies Like Us’, would feature the track. The song would also make it to 8 in Holland and 16 in Belgium

Our final new entry was by local lad Gene Rockwell. ‘Cold Cold Heart’ was his 6th hit to date which put him back in front for number of hits by a local act, pulling 1 clear of Virginia Lee who was in second place. On 6 hits, Rockwell was just 1 place behind the 5 acts that shared the top spot for hits count. The song also accounted for a chart milestone in that it was the 100th song by a solo male artist to make the top 20. ‘Cold Cold Heart’ was a cover of a 1951 track by Hank Williams. The original started out as the b-side of a single called ‘Dear John’ which made number 8 on the US Country Singles charts, but once ‘Cold Cold Heart’ started getting airplay, it was promoted to the a-side and it would top the country singles charts.

Petula Clark continued to clock up the weeks and now sat on 57. This left her unmoved in 6th place on the weeks counts list, but she had pulled clear of The Hollies who dropped to 7th place. Similarly, Jim Reeves was unmoved, but no longer shared 11th place with Tommy Roe as his 44 weeks put him 1 ahead of Roe. Engelbert Humperdinck’s week tally ticked over to 33 which put him tied with Murray Campbell at 19. Because there was a tie at 19 there was no 20th spot and this meant that The New Vaudeville Band, The Turtles and Sandy Posey all fell off the top 20 for weeks count.

Gene Rockwell sat on top of the local weeks count list with 38 to his name and he widened the gap between him and Virginia Lee who was in second place on 34. The Square Set moved up into tied 10th place, sharing the spot with Groep Twee and Emil Dean who were on 15 weeks.

The oldest on the charts was The Tremeloes’ ‘Even The Bad Times Are Good’ which took over from the departing ‘That’s My Desire’ by The Hollies. The former was on 11 weeks. The songs on the top 20 this week averaged exactly 5 weeks each.

Youtube playlist:

24 November 1967

four_jacks_timothy

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Timothy  – Four Jacks & a Jill
2 4 5 Timothy  – Carike Keuzenkamp
3 2 8 The Last Waltz  – Engelbert Humperdinck
4 12 3 Massachusetts  – Bee Gees
5 6 5 There is a Mountain  – Donovan
6 3 7 I Love You  – Lucille Starr
7 7 7 Eternally  – Petula Clark
8 14 4 The Letter  – Box Tops
9 10 4 Look Across the River  – Ian and Ritchie
10 8 10 Even the Bad Times are Good  – Tremeloes
11 5 9 Tabatha Twitchit  – Dominos
12 18 2 Come Back When You Grow Up  – Bobby Vee
13 11 11 That’s My Desire  – Hollies
14 9 8 Just Loving You  – Anita Harris
15 17 3 Light My Fire  – Doors
16 13 6 Lightning’s Girl  – Nancy Sinatra
17 15 3 When Will the Good Apples Fall  – Seekers
18 20 2 I Heard a Heart Break Last Night  – Jim Reeves
19 New 1 You’ve Not Changed  – Sandie Shaw
20 New 1 Carol Corina  – Square Set

Four Jacks & A Jill held on to the top spot for a second week with their song ‘Timothy’ and were joined in the top 2 by ‘Timothy’. No that is not a typo, it was Carike Keuzenkamp’s version of the same song that moved up 2 places to allow the song to dominate the charts this week. This was the second time we had seen the same song at 1 and 2 and it would be the last. The previous occasion was when we had 5 weeks of The Ray Conniff Singers and Roger Williams’ versions of ‘Lara’s Theme’ occupying the top 2 spots (Conniff’s version with vocals entitled ‘Somewhere My Love’ at 1 for 3 of the 5 and Williams’ instrumental version called ‘Lara’s Theme (From Dr Zhivago)’ for the other 2).

The Bee Gees followed up last week’s biggest climb with ‘Massachusetts’ with another biggest climber award for ‘Massachusetts’ as the song moved up 8 from 12 to 4. This was the biggest climb to date that the band had managed and was their 4th biggest climber award, having picked up 2 with ‘New York Mining Disaster 1941. This would not be their last such award, but no other song of theirs (and they would have many more on the charts) would pick up more than 1 biggest climber.

‘Come Back When You Grow Up’ by Bobby Vee and ‘The Letter’ by The Box Tops were the other star raters this week both climbing 6 places to land at 12 and 8 respectively.

The phrase falling down like Dominos came to mind this week as The Domino’s ‘Tabatha Twitchit’ was the faller of the week, dropping 6 places from 5 to 11. This was the 29th time a local song had taken the biggest faller award.

Every Mother’s Son’s ‘Come On Down To My Boat’ was the first of 2 songs to leave the chart this week. It had lasted 7 weeks on the charts and peaked at 9. This would be the band’s only SA chart hit.

In contrast the artist on the other leaver this week, Tom Jones, was seeing the end of his 7th hit’s run on the charts and we were not yet halfway through all the songs by him that would make our top 20. His latest one to leave, ‘I’ll Never Fall In Love Again’ enjoyed 10 weeks with us and peaked at number 3. This ended his run of having ever second hit go to number 1 as his run of peaks now read 1-10-1-7-1-3-3.

With Bobby Vee’s star rater having the word ‘Up’ in the title, one of the leavers having the word ‘Down’ and the other leaver having the word ‘Fall’ we had a case of the ‘up’ song moving up and the ‘down’ song moving down (and out) and the ‘fall’ song falling out the charts.

Sandie Shaw returned to the charts with her 3rd hit to date, ‘You’ve Not Changed’. Her SA chart hit count now equalled the total she has managed so far in the US, but had a long way to go to equal the 22 she has clocked up in the UK. ‘You’ve Not Changed’ was one of the 22 and peaked at 18. It was not one of the 3 that charted in the US. It had been over a year since we last saw Chris Andrews, who composed the song, on our charts in song writer capacity (his previous being his own hit ‘To Whom It Concerns’ which left the charts in May 1966). This was Andrews’ 4th hit as a song writer and 2nd which was a Sandie Shaw recording as he also penned her hit ‘Long Live Love’.

The Square Set clocked up their 2nd SA hit as ‘Carol Corina’ followed up the success a few months earlier of ‘Silence Is Golden’. As with their previous hit, ‘Carol Corina’ was also written by band member Neville Whitmill. The song was released on the Continental record label and it seems you could have a choice of a red, blue or black label. Unlike their previous hit though, this new one is hard to find as it does not seem to appear on any golden oldies compilation CDs.

With Sandie Shaw’s new one, the Brits pulled ahead of the Americans again in terms of hits count after the Yanks drew level with them last week. The locals were in 3rd place with 55. It had been 23 weeks since we had last seen at least 5 local hits in the charts.

Tom Jones was unable to move ahead of The Rolling Stones on the weeks count list as his hit from last week was no longer with us. The 2 acts sat tied at the top of the list with 82 weeks each to their names. Petula Clark and The Hollies were also unmoved on the list, sitting tied 6th, but they no longer shared the spot with Herman’s Hermits. Engelbert Humperdinck on 32 weeks joined the top 20 of the list, sharing the 20th spot with The New Vaudeville Band, Sandy Posey and The Turtles. The Square Set moved up the local list to tied 12th with The A-Cads and Group 66. They were all on 14 weeks.

The very observant may have noticed that this was now the longest period the charts had gone without a Rolling Stones record in them. We had been Stones-less for 29 weeks, going one better than the 28 weeks of the previous drought which ran from the end of August 1966 to the beginning of March 1967. The last time (which co-incidentally was the name of the Stones 2nd SA hit) we saw Mick & the boys in the top 20 was on 12 May 1967 when ‘Ruby Tuesday’ was enjoying its final week with us.

Youtube playlist: