18 June 1971

joy_to_three_dog

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Joy to the World  – Three Dog Night
2 6 4 Funny Funny  – Sweet
3 2 5 If Not for You  – Olivia Newton-John
4 3 9 Put Your Hand in the Hand  – Alan Garrity
5 7 5 Mozart: Symphony No. 40 In G Minor K.550 1° Movement (Allegro Molto)  – Waldo de Los Rios
6 5 5 The Seagull’s Name was Nelson  – Des & Dawn Lindberg
7 4 12 Vicki  – Lance James
8 11 5 Long Days and Lonely Nights  – Lincoln
9 8 15 Have You Ever Seen the Rain?  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
10 14 2 It Don’t Come Easy  – Ringo Starr
11 17 4 When Love Comes Knocking at Your Door  – Dealians
12 9 16 Understanding  – Peanutbutter Conspiracy
13 10 9 Theme from Love Story  – Francis Lai Orchestra
14 19 3 Shilo  – Neil Diamond
15 18 3 Boom Sha La La Lo  – John Edmond
16 20 2 Rosetta  – Fame and Price Together
17 New 1 I am…I Said  – Neil Diamond
18 New 1 Me and You and a Dog Named Boo  – Lobo
19 15 12 What is Life  – George Harrison
20 16 10 Another Day  – Paul McCartney

Three Dog Night held on to the top spot as ‘Joy To The World’ enjoyed its second week there. The Sweet’s ‘Funny Funny’ was looking the most likely to dethrone it as it moved up 4 into second place with previous number 1, Olivia Newton-John’s ‘If Not For You’ dropping 1 place to 3.

The Dealians picked up their second biggest climber award as ‘When Love Comes Knocking at Your Door’ moved up 9 places from 17 to 11. Their previous time with the award had been when ‘Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow’ claimed it with a 7 place climb.

Apart from The Dealians’ 6 place climb, there were 4 other songs that made a 4 or more place star rater jump. There was the aforementioned 4 place climb to 2 that The Sweet’s ‘Funny Funny’ made, Ringo Starr’s ‘It Don’t Come Easy’ moved up 4 to 10, Neil Diamond’s ‘Shilo’ climbed 5 to 14 and Fame And Price Together’s ‘Rosetta’ managed to leap 4 to 16. Starr’s star rater was the 6th for a Beatle post the break up of the group and the Fab Four had now as many star rater climbs in their combined solo capacities as they managed as a group. George led the way for the 3 ex-Beatles who had charted so far with 3 to his name. Paul had 2 and Ringo now had 1.

And talking of ex-Beatles, this week also saw the second of 3 occasions where we would see 2 of them take biggest faller in the same week. George’s ‘What Is Life’ fell 4 to 19 and Paul’s ‘Another Day’ dropped to 20. George’s fall was his 4th time with the biggest drop and this was the 24th time we had seen the number of places fallen to take biggest faller award equal the number of biggest fallers the artist had managed.

Peanut Butter Conspiracy’s ‘Understanding’ moved onto 16 weeks and enjoyed its 3rd as the oldest on the charts. It was almost a year to the day that we last saw a local song reach 16 weeks in the charts and that was when Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ hit that level on 19 June 1970.

We saw 2 songs leave the chart and they were Judy Collins’ ‘Amazing Grace’ and Barbara Ray’s ‘Happy Birthday Baby’. Collins’ hit had reached number 4 during its 10 week stay with us. It would be the only song by her that would make our charts.

‘Happy Birthday Baby’ did not fare as well as Ray’s previous hit and only other one to date. It peaked at 10 during a 6 week run compared to a 10 week run and a peak of 4 for ‘Like I Do’. The good news for Barbara was that there was plenty more to come from her.

Neil Diamond became the 36th act to have more than 1 hit in the chart in a week and the 15th male artist to do so. ‘I Am…I Said’ joined ‘Shilo’ in the top 20 this week, bringing Diamond’s total hit count as an artist to 6 and his count as song writer to 10 as he penned his new entry. He was the 11th song writer to date to reach double figures for number of hits and the 69th to see 2 or more of his compositions in the same top 20. ‘I Am…I Said’ would make it to number 4 in both The US and The UK and would give Diamond his first Grammy nomination as it was shortlisted for the Best Male Pop Vocal Performance. It lost out in the end to James Taylor’s ‘You’ve Got A Friend’. So far of the winners of this particular award, only Frank Sinatra’s ‘Stranger’s In The Night’ and Nilsson’s ‘Everybody’s Talkin’ had made our chart.

The second new entry was a first for Kent Lavoie. Going under the name Lobo, Lavoie’s first SA chart hit was ‘Me And You And A Dog Named Boo’ which landed at 18 this week. The song fared almost as well as Diamond’s new entry mentioned above as it also made it to number 4 in The UK and went just 1 place lower in The US, peaking at 5 there. It did top the charts for 4 weeks in New Zealand.

With both the songs leaving the chart being by solo female artists, we were left with just Olivia Newton-John flying the flag for woman. This ended a run of 10 weeks with more than 1 solo woman in the chart. A further consequence of the leavers was that the local content dropped to 7 hits, 1 down from the record to date 8 we had seen for the previous 2 weeks. The 2 new entries were both by American acts, so the gap of 9 between hits to date by Americans and British acts, was back above double figures as this went to 11 with the Americans having contributed 288 songs to our charts and the Brits 277.

The Dealians moved on to 19 weeks in the charts and this put them in 18th place on their own on the local weeks count list with The Square Set dropping to 19th where they were joined by Lance James whose 18 weeks put him tied with the latter. This meant that The Dream Merchants fell out of the top 20 of the local weeks count list. They had been in that top 20 of that list for 252 weeks and peaked at number 8.

Neil Diamond passed the 600 points mark and was the 26th act to manage this as he moved on to 601 points.

Youtube playlist:

11 June 1971

joy_to_three_dog

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 3 5 Joy to the World  – Three Dog Night
2 1 4 If Not for You  – Olivia Newton-John
3 2 8 Put Your Hand in the Hand  – Alan Garrity
4 4 11 Vicki  – Lance James
5 8 4 The Seagull’s Name was Nelson  – Des & Dawn Lindberg
6 15 3 Funny Funny  – Sweet
7 13 4 Mozart: Symphony No. 40 In G Minor K.550 1° Movement (Allegro Molto)  – Waldo de Los Rios
8 5 14 Have You Ever Seen the Rain?  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
9 6 15 Understanding  – Peanutbutter Conspiracy
10 11 8 Theme from Love Story  – Francis Lai Orchestra
11 14 4 Long Days and Lonely Nights  – Lincoln
12 12 6 Happy Birthday Baby  – Barbara Ray
13 7 10 Amazing Grace  – Judy Collins
14 New 1 It Don’t Come Easy  – Ringo Starr
15 9 11 What is Life  – George Harrison
16 10 9 Another Day  – Paul McCartney
17 16 3 When Love Comes Knocking at Your Door  – Dealians
18 19 2 Boom Sha La La Lo  – John Edmond
19 18 2 Shilo  – Neil Diamond
20 New 1 Rosetta  – Fame and Price Together

Despite its rapid rise to the top spot, Olivia Newton-John’s ‘If Not For You’ only managed to spend a single week there as it was ousted this week by Three Dog Night’s ‘Joy To The World’. The new number 1 had also managed to top the US and Rhodesian (as it was then) charts. Olivia’s hit fell to number 2.

The Sweet’s ‘Funny Funny’ took the biggest climber award as it jumped 9 from 15 to 6.This was the 14th time a UK group had climbed 9 or more in a week with the best climb to date for a UK group being 11 places which The Equals’ ‘Baby Come Back’ had managed.

Waldo De Los Rios’ ‘Mozart: Symphony No. 40’ managed a star rater climb for a second week running as it moved up a further 6 places from 13 to 7.

There were 3 songs that took the biggest faller award this week with 2 of them being by ex-Beatles. George Harrison’s ‘What Is Life’ dropped 6 to 15 while Paul McCartney’s ‘Another Day’ ended up at 16 after also dropping 6. This was the first of 3 occasions we would see 2 ex-Beatles have a biggest faller in the same week. The 2 ex- Fab Fours were joined by Judy Collins’ ‘Amazing Grace’ which dropped 6 to land at 13.

Peanut Butter Conspiracy’s ‘Understanding’ enjoyed a second week as the oldest on the chart. It had been in the top 20 for 15 weeks now.

Last week I mentioned that it was rather surprising that The Rolling Stones’ ‘Brown Sugar’ was a hit in South Africa due to its lyrics hinting at interracial sex and maybe this week the censors realised what the words were about as the song became the 11th to spend just 1 week on the chart at position 20. This was to date The Stones’ worst performing song, but they still had more hits to come. Of the 11 songs that had only spent a week at 20, 3 and a half were by acts for whom this would be their only hit. Those acts were Bobby Bare, The Thomas Group and Chicken Shack with the half being Tony Hatch who saw this occur with his duet with Jackie Trent. Trent would have other hits, but Hatch wouldn’t.

T Rex’s first outing in our top 20 lasted 6 weeks with ‘Hot Love’ peaking at 12 during that period. There would be more to come from Marc Bolan and the boys.

Ringo Starr became the 3rd of the ex-Beatle’s to have a solo hit on our charts as his ‘It Don’t Come Easy’ entered at 14 this week. We had already had 5 weeks where there were 3 songs by ex-Beatles in the chart, but that was with 2 George Harrison hits and 1 Paul McCartney one. This week was the first time we would see 3 of the Fab Four in the top 20 at the same time. This would only happen on 3 occasions and we would never see all 4 together in the same week. What made this particular week special was that it would be the only time the 3 ex-bandmates would sit side by side as we had Ringo’s new one at 14, George Harrison’s ‘What Is Life’ at 15 and Paul McCartney’s ‘Another Day’ at 16. ‘It Don’t Come Easy’ is credited to Starr as writer, but apparently there was a lot of input from George Harrison with Harrison taking production credits. It would top the charts in Canada, go to 4 in both The UK and The US (Billboard Hot 100). The alternate chart listing in the US, Cashbox, had the song going to number 1.

The second new entry teamed up 2 well-known names in British music, Georgie Fame and Alan Price. Calling themselves Fame And Price Together, they recorded a song called ‘Rosetta’ which arrived at number 20 this week. The song gave them a number 11 hit in the UK and topped the Belgium charts. Alan Price had seen SA chart action before with his hit ‘The House That Jack Built’ while for George Fame it would be his first showing on our charts. With such a strong showing from the ex-Beatles this week, one should mention that Georgie Fame is the only act to have knocked The Beatles off the top spot in the UK twice when on 14 January 1965 ‘Yeh Yeh’ dislodged ‘I Feel Fine’ and 3 years later on 24 January 1968 ‘The Ballad Of Bonnie And Clyde’ replaced ‘Hello Goodbye’ at number 1. Alan Price had last seen SA chart action 188 weeks previously and this was the tied second biggest gap between hits to date, equalling the gap Chris Andrews had seen between hits and second only to the 218 weeks that Rick Nelson had had between the 2 chartings of ‘I Need You’.

We enjoyed a second week with a record to date 8 local songs in the top 20 as none of those in last week’s chart had left and the new entries were all by British acts. The Brits now were just 9 hits in total behind those from the US with acts from the UK having had 277 hits to the American’s 286. This was the lowest this gap had been for 83 weeks.

On the top 20 of the weeks count list, there was no movement on the overall scene, but on the local front, The Dealians moved into 18th place, tied with The Square Set, as they clocked up their 18th week. Lance James entered the top 20, sitting tied 20th with The Dream Merchants on 17 weeks.

Youtube playlist:

4 June 1971

olivia_if_not

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 3 If Not for You  – Olivia Newton-John
2 1 7 Put Your Hand in the Hand  – Alan Garrity
3 8 4 Joy to the World  – Three Dog Night
4 6 10 Vicki  – Lance James
5 4 13 Have You Ever Seen the Rain?  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
6 3 14 Understanding  – Peanutbutter Conspiracy
7 5 9 Amazing Grace  – Judy Collins
8 11 3 The Seagull’s Name was Nelson  – Des & Dawn Lindberg
9 7 10 What is Life  – George Harrison
10 10 8 Another Day  – Paul McCartney
11 9 7 Theme from Love Story  – Francis Lai Orchestra
12 12 5 Happy Birthday Baby  – Barbara Ray
13 18 3 Mozart: Symphony No. 40 In G Minor K.550 1° Movement (Allegro Molto)  – Waldo de Los Rios
14 16 3 Long Days and Lonely Nights  – Lincoln
15 17 2 Funny Funny  – Sweet
16 19 2 When Love Comes Knocking at Your Door  – Dealians
17 14 6 Hot Love  – T. Rex
18 New 1 Shilo  – Neil Diamond
19 New 1 Boom Sha La La Lo  – John Edmond
20 New 1 Brown Sugar  – Rolling Stones

We had a new number 1 this week and that was Olivia Newton-John’s ‘If Not For You’. The song took just 3 weeks to get to the top of the charts and was the 12th song to do this with only Shocking Blue’s ‘Venus’ managing it quicker by taking 2 weeks. ‘If Not For You’ was the 10th song by a solo female artist to reach the number 1 spot and Newton-John became the 18th act who would have a total of 5 or more hits, see their first one make it to the top of the charts. The previous number 1, Alan Garrity’s ‘Put Your Hand In The Hand’ dropped to number 2 after 4 weeks at the top.

Three Dog Night’s ‘Joy To The World’ took the biggest climber award as it moved up 5 places from 8 to 3. This was the second time the song had taken the award. It was joined in a 5 place climb by Waldo De Los Rios’ ‘Mozart: Symphony No. 40’ (to give it its short name) which moved up to 13. These 2 were the only star raters this week.

There were also 2 biggest fallers and they were T. Rex’s ‘Hot Love’ which fell 3 from 14 to 17, and The Peanut Butter Conspiracy’s ‘Understanding’ which fell 3 to 6. The latter brought the biggest faller by a local group up to 30. In total there had been 68 times so far that a local song had been a biggest faller.

‘Understanding’ was, however, now the oldest on the charts on 14 weeks as the previous oldest, The Archies ‘A Summer Prayer For Peace’ was 1 of 3 songs to leave the top 20. The latter had spent 14 weeks in the top 20, 4 of which were at the number 1 spot. This brought to an end the illustrious SA chart career of the cartoon group. They had managed 8 hits, spent 78 weeks in the charts in total and had 2 chart toppers, the other being ‘Sugar, Sugar’ which managed 3 weeks at 1 making their weeks at 1 total 7. Of all the acts who would have 5 or more hits on our charts, only 2 would do so with every song having an even number of weeks and these were The Archies and Nancy Sinatra. Sinatra did it with 7 hits, 1 less than The Archies.

Percy Sledge’s ‘Help Me Make It Through The Night’ finished its chart run after of just 3 weeks and a peak of 13. Like The Archies, he had also come to the end of his SA chart career. He manged 12 hits, spent 105 weeks in the top 20 (1 of only 33 acts who would make 100 or more weeks) and, also like The Archies, would have 2 chart toppers, ‘My Special Prayer’ and ‘Come Softly To Me’ both spending 2 weeks at 1 making his total weeks at the top 4. Ultimately Sledge would have the 4th highest weeks count for an African American male artist and all 3 of those who managed better would have the additional help of an expanded chart as they accumulated weeks in the top 30 era. The peak of 13 was the 3rd highest for a song spending 3 weeks in the charts so far with only Trini Lopez’ cover of ‘Master Jack’ which made 12 and Emil Dean’s ‘Key To Your Heart’ which made 3 having managed better, but it should be noted that Dean’s hit was at 3 on the very first chart back in 1965.

Lally Stott’s ‘Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep’ was the third song to go and it was the 23rd to have an equal weeks and peak figure as it spent 9 weeks in the top 20 and peaked at 9. This would be Stott’s only chart hit as an artist. He would feature in the song writing credits of a number of future hits.

Neil Diamond clocked up his 5th hit to date with ‘Shilo’ being the first of our new entries. The song was originally recorded in 1967, but at the time Bang Records, the label Diamond was signed to then, did not feel it would make a good single. After Diamond left Bang and began to have some hits, Bang released the song with a new backing track and it went to number 24 in the US. It had some success in Germany where it went to number 21 and in what was then Rhodesia it made it to 8. As a song writer Diamond, who had penned ‘Shilo’, had seen 9 hits chart in SA, the tied 11th highest by any song writer.

John Edmond saw his 3rd SA chart hit move into the top 20 this week. ‘Boom Sha La La Lo’ was a cover of a song by Hans Poulsen, an Australian of Danish descent. Poulsen would see his version go to number 5 in Australia. He shared song writing credits on the song with Bruce Woodley who had already brought us The Cyrkle’s ‘Red Rubber Ball’ and The Dream Merchants’ ‘Rattler’. Although he was born in Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), Edmond moved to SA in the 60s where he began making music and has therefore been classed as local. ‘Boom Sha La La Lo’ was the 134th song by a local to chart. With a gap of 41 weeks between this and Edmond’s previous hit, ‘Round And Around’, this would be the second biggest gap between his hits that we would see.

It had been 142 weeks since we last saw The Rolling Stones on our charts when ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash’ was enjoying chart success. Before this, the biggest gap we had seen between Stones hits was 62 weeks. Their new one was ‘Brown Sugar’ which had been a chart topper in The US, Switzerland and The Netherlands and just missed out in the UK where it went to number 2. The song was rather a strange one to make our charts during the apartheid era as its lyrics hinted at interracial sex. The censors must have missed that inference.

The arrival of John Edmond on the charts brought the local hit count up to a new record level of 8, 4 of which were by groups, 3 by solo males and 1 by a solo female artist.

There was no movement on the top 20 of the overall weeks count list with The Rolling Stones and Creedence Clearwater revival being the only 2 acts in that list who were in our top 20 this week, but neither act was close enough to those above them to change position. On the local list, The Dealians moved tied 19th with The Dream Merchants on 17 weeks. This meant that Peter Lotis fell out of the top 20 of that list.

Youtube playlist:

28 May 1971

alan-garrity-put-your-hand-in-the-hand-gallo-2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Put Your Hand in the Hand  – Alan Garrity
2 16 2 If Not for You  – Olivia Newton-John
3 2 13 Understanding  – Peanutbutter Conspiracy
4 3 12 Have You Ever Seen the Rain?  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
5 4 8 Amazing Grace  – Judy Collins
6 8 9 Vicki  – Lance James
7 5 9 What is Life  – George Harrison
8 11 3 Joy to the World  – Three Dog Night
9 9 6 Theme from Love Story  – Francis Lai Orchestra
10 7 7 Another Day  – Paul McCartney
11 15 2 The Seagull’s Name was Nelson  – Des & Dawn Lindberg
12 10 4 Happy Birthday Baby  – Barbara Ray
13 6 14 A Summer Prayer for Peace  – Archies
14 12 5 Hot Love  – T. Rex
15 13 3 Help Me Make it Through the Night  – Percy Sledge
16 19 2 Long Days and Lonely Nights  – Lincoln
17 New 1 Funny Funny  – Sweet
18 20 2 Mozart: Symphony No. 40 In G Minor K.550 1° Movement (Allegro Molto)  – Waldo de Los Rios
19 New 1 When Love Comes Knocking at Your Door  – Dealians
20 18 9 Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep  – Lally Stott

Alan Garrity clocked up its 4th week at the top of the charts. It had seen off the challenge of Peanut Butter Conspiracy’s ‘Understanding’ which had been at number 2 for the previous 3 weeks, however, there was a new number 2 this week and this posed a new threat to Alan Garrity’s supremacy.

The new second favourite song of the nation was Olivia Newton-John’s ‘If Not For You’ which climbed a massive 14 places from 16 last week to land at 2. This was the biggest climb to date that we had seen from a song by a female artist and the tied second best overall, equalling the feat of Peter Sarstedt’s ‘Where Do You Go To My Lovely’. The Monkees’ ‘I’m A Believer’ and The Mike Curb Congregation’s ‘Burning Bridges’ still held the record for a climb in a single week as both had managed a 16 place leap. Newton-John’s effort would be equalled by one other song be a solo female and only 1 by a solo female would have a biggest climb in a week. Both the equalling and beating this jump would occur in the top 30 era and both would make the climb from outside the top 20.

There was only 1 other star rater this week and it was Des & Dawn Lindberg’s ‘The Seagull’s Name Was Nelson’ which moved up 4 places from 15 to 11. The gap between Olivia Newton-John’s jump this week and that of the Des & Dawn’s hit which was the second biggest climber was 10 places. This was the 3rd time we had seen this record to date difference between the biggest and second biggest climbs in a week.

The Archies picked up their 3rd biggest faller award with ‘A Summer Prayer For Peace’ taking the honours with a 7 place fall from 6 to 13. Of all the acts who had spent 70 or more weeks in the charts so far, only Tommy Roe could boast having a higher average number of weeks per biggest fall. The Archies averaged a biggest fall every 26 weeks while Tommy Roe averaged 1 every 26.67 weeks. Creedence Clearwater Revival were at the other end of the spectrum seeing a biggest faller every 9.6 weeks.

The Archies not only had the biggest faller of the week, but also now had the oldest song on the chart with ‘A Summer Prayer For Peace’ sitting on 14 weeks. The oldest on last week’s chart, Dave Mills’ ‘Home’, was 1 of 2 songs to leave the charts this week. It had spent 14 weeks with us and peaked at number 2, being kept off the top spot by the song which was now the oldest in the top 20. Mills had now seen 4 hits make the charts and all of them had gone top 5 and reached double figures for weeks. ‘Home’s 14 weeks was his second lowest so far while the peak of 2 was tied second highest. The good news for Mills was that his SA chart career was not yet over.

Tom Jones’ ‘She’s A Lady’ was the other song to leave the charts. It lasted 9 weeks and peaked at 5. Only 4 of Jones’ 16 hits to date had failed to make the top 5, but ‘She’s A Lady’ was 1 of 7 so far by him not to reach double figures for weeks.

British band The Sweet made their SA chart debut with their song ‘Funny Funny’. This was also an SA chart debut for the song writing pair of Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn. This was the 14th song so far where the title of the song was just a word repeated (this ignores stuff in brackets after the initial title). Only 1 of the 14 so far had the word repeated 3 times (Ohio Express’ ‘Yummy Yummy Yummy’). ‘Funny Funny’ would top the charts in Holland and Belgium and make number 2 in Norway and what was then Rhodesia. Apparently Brian Connolly was the only member of the band to actually perform on the single with all the instruments being played by session musicians. It was their 5th single to be released, but their first to make the UK charts where it went to number 13.

The Dealians’ 2nd SA chart hit, ‘When Love Comes Knocking at Your Door’ was the second new entry this week and helped keep the local content of the chart at its record to date level of 7. This was the 11th time we had seen 7 local songs in the charts and the 8th week where the local acts had more hits than any other nationality in the charts. ‘When Love Comes Knocking At Your Door’ was written by Paul Anka and Carole Bayer Sager giving the former his first SA chart hit and the latter her 3rd. The song was originally recorded by The Monkees and appeared on their 2nd album, ‘More Of The Monkees’. Neil Sedaka played piano on The Monkees’ version.

George Harrison reached the 20 weeks in the chart milestone and was the 80th act so far to manage this.

Percy Sledge moved back into tied 2nd spot on the weeks count list, his 105 to date putting him equal with The Troggs and 69 behind leader Tom Jones. On the local list, The Dealians new entry moved them onto 16 weeks and they now shared 20th spot with Peter Lotis.

On the points front, Creedence Clearwater Revival passed the 1,100 mark, their 1,110 putting them 8th overall for points.

‘Help Me Make It Through The Night’ caught up the song that was sitting second last for weeks by a song that had charted in more than 1 version as Percy Sledge’s version moved its weeks count on to 5, a total that ‘Games That Lover’s Play’ had managed via Eddie Fisher and Connie Francis’ versions.

Youtube playlist:

21 May 1971

alan-garrity-put-your-hand-in-the-hand-gallo-2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 5 Put Your Hand in the Hand  – Alan Garrity
2 2 12 Understanding  – Peanutbutter Conspiracy
3 3 11 Have You Ever Seen the Rain?  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
4 6 7 Amazing Grace  – Judy Collins
5 4 8 What is Life  – George Harrison
6 5 13 A Summer Prayer for Peace  – Archies
7 8 6 Another Day  – Paul McCartney
8 7 8 Vicki  – Lance James
9 12 5 Theme from Love Story  – Francis Lai Orchestra
10 11 3 Happy Birthday Baby  – Barbara Ray
11 20 2 Joy to the World  – Three Dog Night
12 14 4 Hot Love  – T. Rex
13 16 2 Help Me Make it Through the Night  – Percy Sledge
14 9 9 She’s a Lady  – Tom Jones
15 New 1 The Seagull’s Name was Nelson  – Des & Dawn Lindberg
16 New 1 If Not for You  – Olivia Newton-John
17 10 14 Home  – Dave Mills
18 15 8 Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep  – Lally Stott
19 New 1 Long Days and Lonely Nights  – Lincoln
20 New 1 Mozart: Symphony No. 40 In G Minor K.550 1° Movement (Allegro Molto)  – Waldo de Los Rios

‘Put Your Hand In The Hand’ by Alan Garrity enjoyed its 3rd week at number 1 and had the honour of clocking up the 50th week where we saw a local act at the top of the charts. Of the 16 local chart toppers to date, only 6 had not managed at least 3 weeks at 1. There had been 5 so far to spend more than 3 weeks at 1, 2 of which were by solo males.

Peanut Butter Conspiracy’s ‘Understanding’ was still at number 2 (the 13th song to manage 3 consecutive weeks at 2) which meant we had a new record 3 consecutive weeks with local hits in the top 2 spots.

Three Dog Night’s ‘Joy To The World’ was also a joy to the group as they picked up their first biggest climber award with the song moving up 9 places from 20 to 11 this week. This was the 68th time we had seen a song climb 9 or more places in a week. There were no other star raters this week with the next biggest climb being 3 places. This was the 21st time we saw a difference of 6 or more between the biggest and second biggest climbs in a week, with 8 of those occasions having a difference bigger than 6 places and the record to date being the 2 occasions when we saw a biggest climb of 16 and a next biggest of 6, making it a 10 place gap between to 2.

Dave Mills’ ‘Home’ got top marks for dive of the week (that’s called trying to put a positive spin on things) as it fell 7 places from 10 to 17, a 2 place bigger fall than the second biggest faller of the week. This was the song’s second time with the biggest faller award. ‘Home’ was now the oldest on the charts due to the departure of the oldest on last week’s chart (see below). It was enjoying its 14th week in the top 20.

Sammi Smith’s ‘Help Me Make It Through The Night’ lasted just 2 weeks in the charts, its sales probably affected by the Percy Sledge release which moved up 3 places to 13. Smith’s version got to a peak of number 19 and would be her only SA chart offering.

George Harrison’s 7 week run with 2 in the charts came to an end as ‘My Sweet Lord’ left the top 20. It had lasted 11 weeks in the charts and peaked at 3. His other hit, ‘What Is Life’ was at number 5, but was also dropping as it fell from 4 to 5.

Michael Nesmith’s ‘Silver Moon’ enjoyed a 9 week run in the charts and peaked at 3. This would be his only solo song to chart in SA, but he had enjoyed 8 other hits as a member of The Monkees. Combining his solo efforts with those as a Monkee, he had 9 hits, spent a total of 63 weeks in the charts with 2 of The Monkees’ hits reaching the top spot.

Last to go was the oldest song on last week’s chart, ‘Knock Three Times’ by Dawn which spent 17 weeks in the chart, of which 6 (non-consecutive) weeks were spent at number 1. There would be further offerings from the group.

Des Lindberg was doing things the opposite way round to Michael Nesmith in that he had his solo hits first (‘Die Gezoem Van Die Bye’ and ‘Ramblin’ Boy’) and then had hits as part of a group, well, that’s if you regard Des & Dawn as a group which is what I have done for statistical purposes. (Note: where a duo such as Des and Dawn have a notable career as a duo, I have treated them as a group rather than looking at the members of the duo individually). Des & Dawn’s new entry was probably their best known hit, ‘The Seagull’s Name Was Nelson’. The song was written and originally recorded by an American chap called Peter E. Bennett. Des & Dawn’s version would spend 5 weeks in the LM Radio charts and peak at 6.

Bob Dylan would never chart on our Top 20 as an artist, but this week he clocked up his 6th hit as a song writer with Olivia Newton-John’s version of his ‘If Not For You’ was the second of our 4 new entries this week. Dylan’s version appeared on his ‘New Morning Album’ and soon after George Harrison, who played on an early take of Dylan’s version, recorded his own cover. However it was Newton-John’s cover that had the chart success, going to 25 in the US and 7 in the UK. It would also top the US Easy Listening chart.

‘Long Days And Lonely Nights’ was the first hit for local band Lincoln. The band formed out of the Bulawayo group The Silhouettes, but changed their name and relocated to South Africa where they hooked up with Terry Dempsey, who arranged for them to record the song. It was written by Patric van Blerk (who would go on to work with Rabbitt, Julian Laxton and Joy to name a few) and would be the first song penned by him to chart.

The final new entry would have the longest song title ever to chart. This was ‘Mozart: Symphony No. 40 In G Minor K.550 1° Movement (Allegro Molto)’ which was 52 characters long (excluding spaces, the brackets, colon and full stops, but including the °). This classical piece was the 26th instrumental song to chart and was performed by Waldo de los Rios who was the first of only 2 Argentinians acts who would ultimately make our charts. He took this piece to number 5 in the UK, 67 in the US and topped the Dutch charts.  Sadly de los Rios committed suicide in March 1977.

With 2 new entries being by local acts and none leaving the chart, we were back up to our record level to date of 7 SA acts in the top 20. This was the most hits by any nation in this week’s chart and was the 7th time the local acts had the greatest representation of any nation on the top 20.

The Archies saw their weeks count move on to 77 and this gave them 15th place on the weeks count list to themselves. Elvis Presley and Engelbert Humperdinck who were still on 76 weeks dropped into tied 16the spot.

Tom Jones, who was way out ahead on the points front, passed another milestone as his total moved past the 2,100 mark. He was just over 800 points clear at the top with The Troggs in second place on 1,305.The 800 points clear that Jones was meant an act song would have to spent 40 weeks at 1 to catch up.

Youtube playlist:

14 May 1971

alan-garrity-put-your-hand-in-the-hand-gallo-2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 4 Put Your Hand in the Hand  – Alan Garrity
2 2 11 Understanding  – Peanutbutter Conspiracy
3 4 10 Have You Ever Seen the Rain?  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
4 5 7 What is Life  – George Harrison
5 3 12 A Summer Prayer for Peace  – Archies
6 10 6 Amazing Grace  – Judy Collins
7 9 7 Vicki  – Lance James
8 8 5 Another Day  – Paul McCartney
9 7 8 She’s a Lady  – Tom Jones
10 6 13 Home  – Dave Mills
11 17 2 Happy Birthday Baby  – Barbara Ray
12 15 4 Theme from Love Story  – Francis Lai Orchestra
13 11 17 Knock Three Times  – Dawn
14 16 3 Hot Love  – T. Rex
15 12 7 Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep  – Lally Stott
16 New 1 Help Me Make it Through the Night  – Percy Sledge
17 14 9 Silver Moon  – Michael Nesmith
18 13 11 My Sweet Lord  – George Harrison
19 19 2 Help Me Make it Through the Night  – Sammi Smith
20 New 1 Joy to the World  – Three Dog Night

Alan Garrity held on to the top spot as ‘Put Your Hand In The Hand’ enjoyed a second week at 1 while another local act, Peanut Butter Conspiracy was unmoved at 2, giving us the 4th time we saw local acts holding the top 2 spots in a week and the first time we had 2 consecutive weeks with this. There would only be a total of 12 times we would see local acts at 1 and 2.

For the 3rd week running we had a local song as the biggest climber and that came in the form of Barbara Ray’s ‘Happy Birthday Baby’ which moved up 6 from 17 to 11. If one includes being part of a duet, this was the 40th time a woman had seen a biggest climber on our charts. Barbara’s climb followed 2 weeks with Alan Garrity’s ‘Put Your Hand In The Hand’ being the climber of the week. This was the 3rd time we had seen a local biggest climber 3 weeks in a row. The first time this happened (way back in 1965), the run went on to be an all-time record 6 weeks in a row.

The only other star rater this week was Judy Collins’ ‘Amazing Grace’ which climbed 4 from 10 to 6. It was a second star rater for both Barbara Ray and Judy Collins.

5 weeks prior to this one, George Harrison’s ‘My Sweet Lord’ took the biggest faller. This week, it picked up its second such award with a 5 place fall from 13 to 18. The gap of 5 weeks between biggest falls, although pretty large, was a little way off the record to date 8 weeks Tom Jones’ ‘I’m Coming Home’ saw.

Dawn’s ‘Knock Three Times’ ticked over to 17 weeks in the charts and enjoyed its 7th as the oldest.

Cliff Richard’s ‘Sunny Honey Girl’ became the 7th song to have a chart run of 2 weeks at number 20 as it fell from the top 20 this week. Cliff was the first act to see this twice as his hit with The Shadows, ‘In The Country’ had the same chart run. The good news for Cliff was that we were far from finished with him on our charts.

Also going was The Mixtures’ ‘Pushbike Song’ which managed 10 weeks and peaked at 9. This would be their only SA chart offering.

Percy Sledge’s 12th SA chart hit arrived in the top 20 this week and it was a cover of the Kris Kristofferson song, ‘Help Me Make It Through The Night’. Arriving at 16 it was already outperforming the other version of the song, that by Sammi Smith, which sat at 19. This was the 24th song now to have charted in more than 1 version. Sledge’s 12 hits to date moved him back in to tied 3rd place on the hits count list, joining The Hollies there, 2 hits behind Cliff Richard and 4 behind overall leader Tom Jones. Sledge had now spent at least 1 week in the charts in every year since 1967.

Three Dog Night followed up their 1970 hit, ‘Mama Told Me Not To Come’ with ‘Joy To The World’, their 2nd to make our charts. It would spent 6 weeks at the top of the US charts, keeping first Marvin Gaye’s ‘What’s Goin’ On’ and then The Oceans’ ‘Put Your Hand In The Hand’ from reaching the number 1 spot. It would also make it to number 1 in Canada and would feature in the 1983 film ‘The Big Chill’. With its classic opening line, ‘Jeremiah was a bullfrog’, the song would sell in excess of 5 million copies worldwide placing it in the top 150 list for the best selling singles of all-time. So far 22 songs that have sold over 5 million copies worldwide had made our charts.

With the departure of the only Aussie act on the chart (The Mixtures) and both new entries being by American acts, we were down to just 4 nations represented in the top 20 (Americans, Brits, South Africans and 1 French act – Francis Lai Orchestra). The last time the diversity of the chart was this low was in the April of 1970. We also saw the American’s have the outright most in the top 20, having spent the previous 9 weeks with either tied most, or less. They now took 8 of the top 20 positions with the Brits taking 6, the locals 5 and the solitary French act the final spot. This was the 125th week where the Americans were outright leaders for number of hits in the top 20. They were 12 behind the Brits who had been outright leaders on 137 occasions.

Creedence Clearwater Revival took 9th spot on the weeks count list for themselves as their 84 to date put them 1 ahead of The Staccatos and the latter dropped to 10th place. The Archies’ 76 weeks put them tied 15th with Elvis Presley and Engelbert Humperdinck.

On the points front, Dave Mills became the 19th act to reach the 800 mark as his total ticked over to 806. He was the 3rd local act to manage it and those 3 acts sat at 17, 18 and 19 on the points total list with Four Jacks & A Jill having the highest total of 837 and The Staccatos on 814 being the second highest  for a local act.

The average number of weeks the songs in the top 20 had been with us moved back to the 7 mark for the first time in 13 weeks. It sat at exactly 7 this week.

Youtube playlist:

7 May 1971

alan-garrity-put-your-hand-in-the-hand-gallo-2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 7 3 Put Your Hand in the Hand  – Alan Garrity
2 4 10 Understanding  – Peanutbutter Conspiracy
3 2 11 A Summer Prayer for Peace  – Archies
4 1 9 Have You Ever Seen the Rain?  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
5 6 6 What is Life  – George Harrison
6 3 12 Home  – Dave Mills
7 5 7 She’s a Lady  – Tom Jones
8 12 4 Another Day  – Paul McCartney
9 10 6 Vicki  – Lance James
10 15 5 Amazing Grace  – Judy Collins
11 8 16 Knock Three Times  – Dawn
12 9 6 Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep  – Lally Stott
13 13 10 My Sweet Lord  – George Harrison
14 11 8 Silver Moon  – Michael Nesmith
15 17 3 Theme from Love Story  – Francis Lai Orchestra
16 19 2 Hot Love  – T. Rex
17 New 1 Happy Birthday Baby  – Barbara Ray
18 16 10 Pushbike Song  – Mixtures
19 New 1 Help Me Make it Through the Night  – Sammi Smith
20 20 2 Sunny Honey Girl  – Cliff Richard

Alan Garrity’s ‘Put Your Hand In The Hand’ became the 5th song to have a biggest climb in the week which took the song to the number 1 spot. Sitting at number 7 last week, the 6 place leap to 1 was the second highest we had seen so far with The 1910 Fruitgum Company’s 7 place climb to 1 being the record so far. Tommy James & The Shondell’s ‘Crimson & Clover’ also climbed 7 to get to number 1 but that was not the biggest climber that week. Garrity’s effort would be the all-time record for a local song which would be equalled once. The 3 weeks ‘Put You Hand In The Hand’ took to get to the top of the charts was tied second quickest with 12 other songs while Shocking Blues’ ‘Venus’ was the only song so far to take 2 weeks. Hilary’s ‘Sunglasses’ was the only other local song so far to take 3 weeks to reach the number 1 spot. A final word on the new number 1 was that Garrity was the 17th act of those who would end up with 5 or more hits to their name, see their first one top the charts, and he was the 3rd local act on that list.

Peanut Butter Conspiracy’s ‘Understanding’ moved into second spot and this was now the 3rd time we had seen the top 2 positions occupied by local acts with the previous time being back in the July of 1968 when Hilary’s ‘Sunglasses’ was at 1 and Quentin E. Klopjaeger’s ‘Lazy Life’ was at 2.

Apart from the new number 1, there were 2 other star raters this week and they were Paul McCartney’s ‘Another Day’ which moved up 4 from 12 to 8 and Judy Collins’ ‘Amazing Grace’ which climb 5 from 15 to 10.

The biggest fall of the week was 3 places which 5 songs saw. Michael Nesmith’s ‘Silver Moon’ plummeted to 14, Lally Stott’s ‘Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep’ fell to 12, Dawn’s ‘Knock Three Times’ dropped to 11, Dave Mills’ ‘Home’ moved down to 6 and Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Have You Ever Seen The Rain?’ made a record equalling dive from the top spot to number 4 and was the 4th song to have such a big fall from grace. With Garrity taking climber and Mills being one of the fallers, this was the 11th occasion we had seen local acts take both climber and faller in the week. Creedence were now just 1 behind Tom Jones and The Bee Gees for number of biggest fallers, this being their 9th to date. 10 was the most an act had managed so far.

Dawn’s ‘Knock Three Times’ was on 16 weeks and enjoyed its 6th week as the oldest in the chart.

There were 2 songs which left the chart this week, the first of which was Tony Christie’s ‘Las Vegas’ which had spent just 3 weeks in the top 20. The highest position it managed to get to was 18. This was Christie’s first SA chart hit and would be by far the worst performance any of his songs would have.

We also bid farewell to Lynn Anderson’s ‘Rose Garden’ which had lasted 13 weeks in the charts and spent 4 frustrating weeks at 2, never making that final step up to number 1. This would be her sole SA chart offering.

The first of the new entries was Barbara Ray’s 2nd SA chart hit, ‘Happy Birthday Baby’. The song was a cover version of a 1957 hit for the Tune Weavers which made it to number 5 in the US. Ray became the 6th local woman to see a second hit make the charts with only Judy Page and Viginia Lee so far managing more than 2, their count being 3 and 6 respectively. ‘Happy Birthday Baby’ had the distinction of being the 130th local song to make the charts.

Jewel Faye Smith brought us our second new entry. Better known as Sammi Smith, her cover of Kris Kristofferson’s ‘Help me Make It Through the Night’ entered the charts at 19 this week. Her version of the song, which Kristofferson had released the previous year, would top the Country Singles charts in the US and make it to number 8 on the main Billboard Hot 100. The song would see chart action in the US with 3 further cover versions, but none would peak as high as Sammi’s version. O.C. Smith and Joe Simon would chart in 1971 with their covers going to 91 and 72 respectively while in 1973 Gladys Knight & The Pips would achieve the second highest peak for the song when they reached number 33.

Creedence Clearwater Revival continued to climb up the weeks count list as their 83 weeks to date took them into tied 9th spot on the list alongside local act, The Staccatos.

George Harrison enjoyed his 6th week with 2 in the top 20 as both ‘My Sweet Lord’ and ‘What Is Life’ continued their top 20 runs.

Youtube playlist: