20 October 1972

I_can_see_clearly_now_(Johnny_Nash)

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 I Can See Clearly Now  – Johnny Nash
2 2 15 Sylvia’s Mother  – Dr. Hook
3 5 17 Nice to be with You  – Gallery
4 3 16 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday  – Jessica Jones
5 4 8 It’s too Late Now  – Lauren Copley
6 6 19 I Need Someone  – Alan Garrity
7 7 11 Mama, Papa (Nana, Nana)  – Cyan
8 8 10 Every Day Every Night  – John Edmond
9 9 7 Sunshine Lover  – Daniel Boone
10 10 8 Popcorn  – Popcorn Makers
11 12 5 Burning Love  – Elvis Presley
12 11 21 Come What May (aka Aprés Toi)  – Vicky Leandros
13 13 5 A Shoulder to Cry On  – Denise Freeman
14 15 4 Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)  – Looking Glass
15 14 9 Take Me Bak ‘ome  – Slade
16 New 1 Speak Softly Love (Love Theme from “The Godfather”)  – Andy Williams
17 16 9 Popcorn  – Hot Butter
18 20 2 Wig-Wam Bam  – Sweet
19 19 2 Breaking Up is Hard to Do  – Partridge Family
20 New 1 Run to Me  – Bee Gees

‘I Can See Clearly now’ by Johnny Nash enjoyed a second week at number 1 with the previous chart topper, Dr Hook’s ‘Sylivia’s Mother’, unmoved at 2. The threat to these 2 songs came from Gallery’s ‘Nice To Be With You’ which had spent the last 13 weeks bouncing around between positions 6 and 3. It moved back up to 3 this week from 5.

It only took a 2 place climb to be climber of the week and Gallery’s ‘Nice To Be With You’ mentioned above was 1 of only 2 songs that managed this. The other one was The Sweet’s ‘Wig Wam Bam’ which moved up from 20 to 18. Sitting on 17 weeks in the charts, Gallery’s hit was the second oldest to be a biggest climber with only Peter Maffay’s ‘You’ which managed it on 21 weeks being better. By the time the charts ended there would only be 1 song that would outdo both the 2 aforementioned hits in this respect.

On the falling front there were 5 songs that fell 1 place and this was the first time that dropping just a single place earned you the faller of the week award. The 5 songs that managed this were Hot Butter’s ‘Popcorn’ (down to 17), Slade’s ‘Take Me Bak ‘Ome’ (down to 15), Vicky Leandros’ ‘Come What May’ (down to 12), Lauren Copley’s ‘It’s Too Late Now’ (down to 5) and Jessica Jones’ ‘Sunday, Monday Tuesday’ (down to 4). We had seen 3 weeks where there were 3 solo males as fallers and 3 weeks where 3 groups were the fallers, but this was the first time we saw 3 solo female artists take the award.

David Cassidy’s ‘Could It Be Forever’ lasted just 1 week in the chart and it spent that week at 18. This would not be his only SA chart hit however.

Apart from one of the youngest on the chart last week being a leaver, the oldest song also left the top 20 and that was The Hollies’ ‘Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress’ which had managed 22 weeks, 1 of which had been spent at number 1. As with David Cassidy, this would not be the last we would see of The Hollies in our charts.

The new oldest song in the top 20 was Vicky Leandros’ ‘Come What May’ which sat on 21 weeks and this was a new record to date for weeks in the chart by a song by a solo female artist. The song also became the 12th to reach the 300 points mark as its total ticked over to 307. This also placed it top of the points list for songs by solo female artists, overtaking Sandy Posey’s ‘Single Girl’ which managed 302 points.

The first of the newcomers was Andy Williams with his 3rd SA chart hit, ‘Speak Softly Love (Love Theme From “The Godfather”)’ which, as the bit in brackets in the title suggests, was from the film ‘The Godfather’ which won the best picture Oscar and was directed by Francis Ford Coppola. It had been 123 weeks since we last saw Williams in the top 20 and this was the 36th time we had seen a gap of 100 or more weeks between hits by an artist and was the 23rd biggest gap we had seen to date. Nina Rota, who wrote the music for Williams’ hit, was disqualified at the last minute from the Music Score Oscar when it was discovered he had used the same tune in a 1958 film called ‘Fortunella’. Andy William’s song made number 34 in the US and 42 in the UK. It fared a little better in Holland where it managed a respectable number 11 and reached 21 in Belgium.

The Bee Gees enjoyed having a 12th hit on our charts this week as ‘Run To Me’ entered at 20. They were now tied 4th for number of hits on the charts equalling Percy Sledge and being 1 behind The Hollies who were on 13, 2 behind Cliff Richard on 14 and 5 behind Tom Jones who led the way with 17. ‘Run To Me’ would be their 14th UK hit where it managed to get to number 9. In the US it was their 17th hit and made it to number 16. On the LM Radio Charts it had a 22 week run which included 2 at the top. The Bee Gees had now had a hit in the charts for at least 1 week in every year from 1967 to 1972, a run of 6 consecutive years. The only other act to manage this so far was Tom Jones although his run went right back to 1965, a run of 8 years. The gap between ‘Run To Me’ and ‘How Can You Mend A Broken Heart?’, the Bee Gees’ previous hit, was just over a year as the latter had vacated the charts 54 weeks previously. Writintg credits on the song went to all 3 of the Gibb brothers and Barry moved into tied 4th place for number of hits by a song writer with 15 to his name while Robin was 9th with 13 and Maurice was tied 14th with 10.

Lauren Copley saw her total weeks count reach the 20 mark and she was the 28th local act to manage this. Elvis Presley meanwhile reached the 90 weeks mark and was the 11th act to manage this. He was unmoved at 11th on the overall weeks count list and still sat 2 behind Tommy Roe who was in 10th place. Also celebrating a landmark was Daniel Boone, but his was for consecutive weeks in the charts as he had seen at least 1 hit in the chart for 30 straight weeks now. His overall weeks count was 42.

Alan Garrity climbed into tied 13th place on the local weeks count list with 32 weeks to his name. He shared the spot with Barbara Ray and The Dealians.

‘Popcorn’ moved into the top 20 for weeks by a song charting in more than 1 version. It had clocked up 9 weeks from the Hot Butter Version and 8 from the Popcorn Makers version putting its total at 17.

Youtube playlist:

13 October 1972

I_can_see_clearly_now_(Johnny_Nash)

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 8 6 I Can See Clearly Now  – Johnny Nash
2 1 14 Sylvia’s Mother  – Dr. Hook
3 2 15 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday  – Jessica Jones
4 6 7 It’s too Late Now  – Lauren Copley
5 4 16 Nice to be with You  – Gallery
6 3 18 I Need Someone  – Alan Garrity
7 5 10 Mama, Papa (Nana, Nana)  – Cyan
8 10 9 Every Day Every Night  – John Edmond
9 7 6 Sunshine Lover  – Daniel Boone
10 9 7 Popcorn  – Popcorn Makers
11 11 20 Come What May (aka Aprés Toi)  – Vicky Leandros
12 14 4 Burning Love  – Elvis Presley
13 12 4 A Shoulder to Cry On  – Denise Freeman
14 13 8 Take Me Bak ‘ome  – Slade
15 17 3 Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)  – Looking Glass
16 15 8 Popcorn  – Hot Butter
17 16 22 Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress  – Hollies
18 New 1 Could it be Forever  – David Cassidy
19 New 1 Breaking Up is Hard to Do  – Partridge Family
20 New 1 Wig-Wam Bam  – Sweet

Johnny Nash’s ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ became the 3rd song to make a record to date 7 place jump up to number 1 as it moved from number 8 last week into the top spot this week. The 2 previous songs to manage a 7 place jump to 1 were Tommy James & The Shondells’ ‘Crimson & Clover’ and The 1910 Fruitgum Company’s ‘Indian Giver’, both of which had done so in 1969. Last week’s number 1, Dr’ Hook’s ‘Sylvia’s Mother’ fell to 2 and ended Jessica Jones’ hopes of breaking the local record for consecutive weeks at 2 as her ‘Sunday, Monday, Tuesday’ fell to 3 after a record equalling 4 weeks at 2.

The new number 1 was the 50th song by an American act to top our charts. Not only that, it was also the climber of the week as well as the only star rater.

Faller of the week went to Alan Garrity’s ‘I Need Someone’ which dropped 3 places from 3 to 6 to give him his 3rd biggest faller award. Garrity’s 3 fallers had come with a 5 then 4 and now 3 place fall. He must have been worried about dropping 2 places soon.

‘Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress’ moved on to 22 weeks in the charts and was enjoying its 6th week as the oldest. The 22 weeks placed it 5th overall for weeks in the chart by a song and the 6 weeks as the oldest moved The Hollies on to a total of 15 weeks where they had had the oldest in the chart. They were only the 4th act so far to see this many weeks with the oldest song in the chart. ‘Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress’ also now had the all-time record for number of times the song changed its direction of movement in the charts as it dropped 1 after climbing 1 last week giving it its 13th change of direction.

Drummond’s ‘Daddy Cool’ became the 19th song to have a total chart run of just 1 week at number 20 as the song exited the top 20 after being a new entry last week. They were the 7th act so far where this would be the sum total of their SA chart action.

Gries Heimer (aka David Gresham) also only spent 1 week in the top 20 as his hit, ‘Bonely Bonela’, dropped off the chart of after entering it last week at 19. It was the 11th song so far to have a total run of 1 week at 19 and the 3rd local song to do this with Gene Petersen’s ‘Love Is Blue’ and Judy Page’s ‘What A Woman In Love Won’t Do’ being the other 2.

Last to go was Middle Of The Road’s ‘Talk Of All The U.S.A.’ which lasted 10 weeks and peaked at 9. So far all 5 of their hits had gone top 10 and all of them had managed 10 or more weeks. ‘Talk Of All The U.S.A.’ was their worst performing to date on both weeks and peak fronts. There were still more hits to come from the band, but this brought to an end their record 44 consecutive weeks featuring in the charts.

New to the charts was David Cassidy (new only as a solo artist) with ‘Could It Be Forever’. He had managed a number 37 placing in the US with this song and got to number 2 in the UK where it was billed as a double a-side single along with ‘Cherish’.

The reason I mentioned that David Cassidy was new only as a solo artist was that he was part of the group that was responsible for the 2nd new entry this week. The Partridge Family who had already been on the charts in 1970 with ‘I Think I Love You’, returned with ‘Breaking Up Is Hard To Do’. This was a cover of a Neil Sedaka song and it gave Sedaka his 3rd hit as a songwriter in SA, but he never managed to chart as an artist. Sedaka’s version topped the US charts and made number 7 in the UK. The Partridge Family bettered Sedaka’s UK peak by reaching number 3 there, but only managed to get to 28 in the US.

The last of our new entries was the 5th hit by The Sweet, ‘Wig-Wam Bam’. This was the 6th composition by the song writing team of Nicky Chinn and Mike Chapman to chart. It was apparently the first song on which the band was allowed to play the instruments as their record company had insisted on using session musicians on their previous singles. ‘Wig-Wam Bam’ would give them their 6th song to chart in the UK (the only one of the previous 5 UK hits not to chart in SA was ‘Alexander Graham Bell’) and it reached number 4 there. It also made number 2 in Switzerland, 5 in Austria, 6 in Holland, 3 in Belgium and 6 in Norway as well as getting to number 5 on the LM Radio charts and topping the charts in Zimbabwe. Despite all this, it failed to chart in the US. ‘Wig Wam Bam’ was the 900th song to make the charts.

With 2 of the new entries being by American acts and only 1 being by a British act, the Americans took the outright lead again for total number of hits to date with 325 to their name compared to the Brits 324. The 2 nations had been neck and neck for 2 weeks and the 8 weeks before that it had been the UK acts who had been the outright leader.

Vicky Leandros’ ‘Come What May’ became the 14th song to reach the 20 weeks in the charts mark and now equalled the record to date for weeks for a song by a solo female artists as it joined Sandy Posey’s ‘Single Girl’ on that total.

The Hollies reached the 120 weeks in the chart milestone while Vicky Leandros hit 20. The Hollies were in second place on the weeks count list, but still sat 64 weeks behind leader Tom Jones. 103 acts had reached 20 weeks in total in the chart so far.

John Edmond shook off Virginia Lee to have 9th place on the local weeks count list to himself as his 37 weeks to date put him 1 ahead of Virginia Lee who fell to 10th. Also on the local list, Alan Garrity moved into tied 15th place with Des Lindberg with both acts on 31.

The average weeks the top 20 songs had been with us moved on to 9 exactly. It had been 35 weeks since we had last seen this average at 9 or more.

Youtube playlist:

6 October 1972

sylvias_mother_dr_hook

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 13 Sylvia’s Mother  – Dr. Hook
2 2 14 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday  – Jessica Jones
3 4 17 I Need Someone  – Alan Garrity
4 3 15 Nice to be with You  – Gallery
5 5 9 Mama, Papa (Nana, Nana)  – Cyan
6 9 6 It’s too Late Now  – Lauren Copley
7 10 5 Sunshine Lover  – Daniel Boone
8 6 5 I Can See Clearly Now  – Johnny Nash
9 11 6 Popcorn  – Popcorn Makers
10 7 8 Every Day Every Night  – John Edmond
11 8 19 Come What May (aka Aprés Toi)  – Vicky Leandros
12 14 3 A Shoulder to Cry On  – Denise Freeman
13 12 7 Take Me Bak ‘ome  – Slade
14 15 3 Burning Love  – Elvis Presley
15 13 7 Popcorn  – Hot Butter
16 17 21 Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress  – Hollies
17 19 2 Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)  – Looking Glass
18 16 10 Talk of All The U.S.A.  – Middle of the Road
19 New 1 Bonely Bonela  – Gries Heimer
20 New 1 Daddy Cool  – Drummond

Dr Hook’s ‘Syliva’s Mother’ ticked over to 6 weeks at 1 while at number 2 Jessica Jones was busy equalling the record to date consecutive weeks at number 2 for a local song as ‘Sunday, Monday, Tuesday’ spent its 4th straight week there. The only other local song to manage this so far had been Lincoln’s ‘Long Days And Lonely Nights’.

Lauren Copley’s ‘It’s Too Late Now’ and Daniel Boone’s ‘Sunshine Lover’ were the climbers of the week with both songs moving up 3 places to land at 6 and 7 respectively. It was a second time with the award for Copley and a 4th time for Boone.

There were also 2 fallers of the week and they also moved 3 places to take the award and, like the climbers, one of them was local. The songs were John Edmond’s ‘Every Day Every Night’ which fell to 10 and Vicky Leandros’ ‘Come What May’ which fell to 11 and gave the faller another thing in common with the climbers in that the 2 fallers ended up sitting next to each other in the chart as the climbers had done at 6 and 7. This was the 18th time we saw local acts taking climber and faller in the same week.

The Hollies ‘Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress’ entered its 21st week in the charts and its 5th as the oldest. The band had now seen 14 weeks in total with an oldest song in the charts and they were the 5th act to clock up this many weeks.

The Eagles’ ‘Take It Easy’ lasted just 3 weeks in the chart, peaking at 16 during that time and this would be the sum total of the band’s SA chart career. In the US they have managed 21 Hot 100 hits, 5 of which have topped the charts there while their greatest hits album (‘Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975’) has spent over 200 weeks in the top 200 of the album charts and was the best-selling album in the US in the 20th century (outselling Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ which only moved past The Eagles album after Jackson’s death in 2009). All that success in the US and all we gave them was 3 measly weeks!

Don McLean had a much better outing with ‘Vincent’ which managed 11 weeks and peaked at 6, outperforming its peak of 12 in the US. This would not be McLean’s only sojourn into our top 20.

The first of the new entries was by a local artist called Gries Heimer. This name was an attempt to disguise the real identity of the artist as he happened to be the man who presented the Top 20. Yes, this was David Gresham using a pseudonym. The song was a cover of an obscure Italian song originally recorded by Filipino singer Antonio Morales Barretto who went under the name of Junior (not the same Junior who had a hit in 1982 with ‘Mama Used To Say’). While the song itself was obscure, its writer, Fernando Arbex, was no stranger to our charts as 2 of his compositions had already charted (Middle Of The Road’s ‘Soley Soley’ and Cyan’s ‘Mama Papa (Nana Nana)’ which was at 5 this week).

The other new entry was also a rather obscure song. ‘Daddy Cool’ was by Australian group Drummond and was not the same song as the Boney M hit which came later in 1976. Drummond’s song was written by Frank Slay and Bob Crewe and was originally recorded in 1957 by the Doo-wop group The Rays. UK band The Darts took a version of it to number 6 in the UK and Drummond topped the charts in their native Australia with it. Drummond would evolve into The Little River Band. The Aussie’s had now seen a total of 11 hits make our charts, they still sat 6th overall for the most hits by a nation but were now just 1 behind the Germans who were on 12.

There were now 6 local songs in the charts and this equalled the number the US act had and the 2 nations tied for the most hits in the top 20. This was the 44th time that the local acts had had the most songs in the charts. 29 of those they were outright leaders, and 15 times they tied.

Daniel Boone hit the 40 weeks in the chart milestone while local lad, Alan Garrity reached the 30 weeks mark. This pushed Garrity into tied 17th place on the local weeks count list where he shared the spot with Dickie Loader.

On the overall weeks count list, The Hollies made 2nd place their own as their 119 weeks put them 1 ahead of The Troggs and the latter fell to 3rd. Despite having the biggest faller this week, John Edmond moved into tied 9th place on the local weeks count list where his 36 weeks to date put him level with Virginia Lee.

On the points front we saw Middle Of The Road reach the 800 Mark and Daniel Boone the 500 mark. Middle Of The Road sat 21st on the overall points list while Boone was at 36 and was the 37th act to reach a half grand of points.

Middle Of The Road extended their lead for consecutive weeks in the chart as they had seen at least 1 hit in the chart for 44 weeks in a row.

‘Popcorn’s 2 versions clocked up 13 weeks in total for the song and it sat tied 23rd for week in the chart for songs charting in more than 1 version. They shared the spot with ‘I’ll Step Aside’ (Ronnie Wilson and Tony Wells) and ‘Green Tambourine’ (Lemon Pipers and Sun Dragon).

The week saw the 20th time the act at the top of the charts and that at the bottom of the charts shared the same first letter as we had Dr. Hook at 1 and Drummond at 20. The last time we saw this was in June of this year when Daniel Boone was at 1 and Donny Osmond at 20.

Youtube playlist:

29 September 1972

sylvias_mother_dr_hook

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 12 Sylvia’s Mother  – Dr. Hook
2 2 13 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday  – Jessica Jones
3 4 14 Nice to be with You  – Gallery
4 3 16 I Need Someone  – Alan Garrity
5 5 8 Mama, Papa (Nana, Nana)  – Cyan
6 7 4 I Can See Clearly Now  – Johnny Nash
7 10 7 Every Day Every Night  – John Edmond
8 8 18 Come What May (aka Aprés Toi)  – Vicky Leandros
9 9 5 It’s too Late Now  – Lauren Copley
10 11 4 Sunshine Lover  – Daniel Boone
11 6 5 Popcorn  – Popcorn Makers
12 12 6 Take Me Bak ‘ome  – Slade
13 15 6 Popcorn  – Hot Butter
14 17 2 A Shoulder to Cry On  – Denise Freeman
15 20 2 Burning Love  – Elvis Presley
16 14 9 Talk of All The U.S.A.  – Middle of the Road
17 13 20 Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress  – Hollies
18 19 11 Vincent  – Don McLean
19 New 1 Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)  – Looking Glass
20 16 3 Take it Easy  – Eagles

‘Sylvia’s Mother’ spent a 5th week at number 1 and it was the 20th song so far to manage at least this many weeks at the top spot. Jessica Jones’ ‘Sunday, Monday, Tuesday’ was enjoying a 3rd consecutive week at 2.

Elvis became the 13th of 35 acts who would see at least 7 biggest climbers as ‘Burning Love’ took the award for him this week as it moved up 5 from 20 to 15. It was the only star rater this week and Elvis’ 13th making him the 9th of 28 who would eventually manage at least this many climbs of 4 or more.

The Popcorn Makers’ ‘Popcorn’ accounted for the 5th time a song by a German act took the faller of the week award as it did so with a drop of 5 places from 6 to 11. We had twice seen a drop of 7 places for a German hit, a 6 place drop once and this was now the second time we were seeing a 5 place fall by a song by a German act.

While Elvis was the 13th act to reach 10 hits, The Hollies’ ‘Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress’ became the 13th song to reach the magical 20 weeks in the chart total. This was only the 3rd song by a British act to manage this. The Americans had seen 4 do so, but it was the locals who led the way with 5. Germany’s Peter Maffay made up the balance. It was The Hollies’ hit’s 4th week as the oldest in the chart.

Neil Diamond’s ‘Song Sung Blue’ was the only song to leave the top 20 this week. It had been with us for 14 weeks and peaked at 5. Only 1 song so far (Tony Christie’s ‘(Is This the Way To) Amarillo’) had a lower peak (it made 6) for a song spending 14 weeks in the chart while 1 other (Ken J. Larkin’s ‘Turn Around’) had also peaked at 5. Of Diamond’s 8 hits to date, ‘Song Sung Blue’ had the 3rd highest peak and the second best weeks figures. There was still plenty to come from him.

Replacing ‘Song Sung Blue’ on the charts was Looking Glass’ ‘Brandy (You’re A Fine Girl)’. The song knocked Gilbert O’Sullivan’s ‘Alone Again (Naturally)’ off the top spot in the US on 26 August 1972, but was immediately knocked off the number 1 spot the next week by O’Sullivan returning to the top. In South Africa, it did not have anything to fear from ‘Alone Again (Naturally)’ as that particular O’Sullivan track did not chart on our charts. Looking Glass did not chart in the UK, but ‘Brandy…’ made it to number 30 in Holland.

With a song by solo male leaving the chart and the new entry being by a group, we were back into a situation where at least half the songs in the top 20 were by groups after last week’s dip to 9 having ended a previous run of 28 weeks with groups dominating. We also saw the Americans drawing level with the British acts for total number of hits in the charts. Both nations had given us 323 hits so far.

The Hollies moved into tied second place on the weeks count list as their 118 to date placed them alongside Creedence Clearwater Revival. They were still 66 weeks behind Tom Jones who led the way.

Alan Garrity made 17th place on the local weeks count list his own as his 29 weeks put him 1 ahead of Tidal Wave and the latter, whom he had shared 17th place with last week, dropped to 18th.

Elvis became the 12th act to reach 1,000 point in the charts as his total ticked over to 1,005. Of the 12 to manage this so far 7 had been British acts and 5 were now Americans.

Middle Of The Road’s consecutive weeks in the chart run moved on to 43 as ‘Talk Of All The U.S.A.’ at 16 was still flying the Top 20 flag for them.

‘Popcorn’s total weeks moved on to 11 between its 2 versions and this moved it up to 25th for weeks on the charts by a song charting in more than 1 version.

Youtube playlist:

22 September 1972

sylvias_mother_dr_hook

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 11 Sylvia’s Mother  – Dr. Hook
2 2 12 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday  – Jessica Jones
3 3 15 I Need Someone  – Alan Garrity
4 4 13 Nice to be with You  – Gallery
5 6 7 Mama, Papa (Nana, Nana)  – Cyan
6 7 4 Popcorn  – Popcorn Makers
7 12 3 I Can See Clearly Now  – Johnny Nash
8 5 17 Come What May (aka Aprés Toi)  – Vicky Leandros
9 10 4 It’s too Late Now  – Lauren Copley
10 8 6 Every Day Every Night  – John Edmond
11 17 3 Sunshine Lover  – Daniel Boone
12 9 5 Take Me Bak ‘ome  – Slade
13 11 19 Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress  – Hollies
14 13 8 Talk of All The U.S.A.  – Middle of the Road
15 18 5 Popcorn  – Hot Butter
16 19 2 Take it Easy  – Eagles
17 New 1 A Shoulder to Cry On  – Denise Freeman
18 14 14 Song Sung Blue  – Neil Diamond
19 16 10 Vincent  – Don McLean
20 New 1 Burning Love  – Elvis Presley

Dr Hook’s ‘Sylvia’s Mother’ saw off the challenge from Jessica’s Jones’ ‘Sunday, Monday, Tuesday’ as it enjoyed a 4th week at 1 while the latter sat at 2 for a second week and was (so far) unable to regain the top spot. Alan Garrity’s ‘I Need Someone’ and Gallery’s ‘Nice To be With You’ were also unmoved at 3 and 4 respectively.

Daniel Boone picked up his 3rd biggest climber award as ‘Sunshine Lover’ moved up to 11 from 17, a 6 place climb. Both of his previous 2 hits (‘Beautiful Sunday’ and ‘Daddy Don’t You Walk So Fast’) had managed to get the award.

Last weeks’s climber, Johnny Nash’s ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ was the only other star rater this week as it climbed 5 from 12 to 7.

Neil Diamond’s ‘Song Sung Blue’ took the faller of the week award with a 4 place drop from 14 to 18. This was his 5th time with the award.

Excluding songs on the very first chart, The Hollies became the 9th act to clock up 12 weeks with the oldest song in the chart as ‘Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress’ spent its 19th week in the chart and its 3rd as the oldest.

The Sweet’s ‘Little Willy’ was the first of 2 songs to leave the charts this week and it was the second of only 7 songs that would have a peak of 9 and a weeks count of 11. What is so special about those particular weeks and peak figures you may well ask. Well, if one calculates the average weeks and peak of all the songs that would eventually chart, then they would round to a peak of 9 during an 11 week run, so, using this criteria, ‘Little Willy’ was an average song. However, in terms of songs by The Sweet which charted in SA, it had the 3rd highest weeks and peak of their 4 chart hits so far. We were not done with them yet.

We also said goodbye to Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Someday Never Comes’. It had been with us for 13 weeks and peaked at 6 during that time. This brought the curtain down on Creedence’s SA chart career. They had seen 11 songs chart and spent 118 weeks in the chart which placed them second for weeks to date. They managed 3 number 1 hits which were ‘Proud Mary’ (2weeks), ‘Bad Moon Rising’ (1 week) and ‘Have you Ever Seen The Rain?’ (1 week), giving a total of 4 weeks at 1. By the time the charts finished in 1989, they would sit 17th overall for points earned based on a slightly skewed method which included the top 30 when the charts expanded and simply allocating 30 points for a week at 1, 29 for a week at 2 etc. If one ignores the positions 21 to 30 once the charts expanded and sticks to a 20 points for a week at 1, 19 for a week at 2 etc, then it only slightly improves things for Creedence as they end up 16th overall on that basis.

First of the new entries was another British born artist who moved to South Africa and recorded there, so that we claim her as local – Denise Freeman. Her ‘A Shoulder To Cry On’ was from the movie ‘The Winners’ and was written and produced by Robin Netcher. This would be Netcher’s 5th and final song to chart where he was songwriter.

Elvis Presley became the 11th act to reach double figures for hits as ‘Burning Love’ became his 10th SA hit. In the UK it would be his 84th hit and would peak at 7 while in the US it would be his 123rd hit, reaching number 2 there (Chuck Berry’s ‘My Ding-A-Ling’ keeping him from the top spot). In Europe it would make number 17 in Holland and Belgium and 72 in Switzerland while down under in Australia it would peak at 37. It would also get to number 3 on the LM Radio charts.

It had been 29 weeks since less than half the chart was made up of hits by groups and this week we saw the total for hits by groups drop to 9 with 6 being by solo male artists and the other 3 being by solo female artists. We also saw the Brits’ total drop to just 4 in the chart where they had recently been so dominant. The Americans had 8 of the top 20, the South Africans 5 (the highest total it had been for 30 weeks) while Germany, Greece and Italy added the final 3. Overall, the Brits lead was down to just 1 now as they had contributed 323 hits so far compared to the American’s 322.

The top 20 of the weeks count list was unchanged this week, but on the local list we saw Groep Twee and Murray Campbell drop to tied 11th as John Edmond (who was unmoved at 10) moved 1 week ahead of them with his total of 34 weeks to date. Alan Garrity climbed into tied 17th place with Tidal Wave with both acts on 28 weeks.

Middle Of The Road extended their record to date run of consecutive weeks in the chart as they had had at least 1 song in the chart for 42 straight weeks now.

The 2 versions of ‘Popcorn’ that were bouncing around the charts had clocked up a total of 9 weeks between them (5 by Hot Butter and 4 by The Popcorn Makers). This was the 28th highest total for songs charting in more than 1 version with 31 songs so far making it in more than 1 version.

Youtube playlist:

15 September 1972

sylvias_mother_dr_hook

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 10 Sylvia’s Mother  – Dr. Hook
2 4 11 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday  – Jessica Jones
3 2 14 I Need Someone  – Alan Garrity
4 3 12 Nice to be with You  – Gallery
5 5 16 Come What May (aka Aprés Toi)  – Vicky Leandros
6 6 6 Mama, Papa (Nana, Nana)  – Cyan
7 7 3 Popcorn  – Popcorn Makers
8 9 5 Every Day Every Night  – John Edmond
9 8 4 Take Me Bak ‘ome  – Slade
10 12 3 It’s too Late Now  – Lauren Copley
11 13 18 Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress  – Hollies
12 18 2 I Can See Clearly Now  – Johnny Nash
13 15 7 Talk of All The U.S.A.  – Middle of the Road
14 10 13 Song Sung Blue  – Neil Diamond
15 14 13 Someday Never Comes  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
16 11 9 Vincent  – Don McLean
17 19 2 Sunshine Lover  – Daniel Boone
18 17 4 Popcorn  – Hot Butter
19 New 1 Take it Easy  – Eagles
20 16 11 Little Willy  – Sweet

‘Sylvia’s Mother’ by Dr Hook entered its 3rd week at the top of the charts but was coming under threat from renewed interest in Jessica Jones’ ‘Sunday, Monday, Tuesday’ which moved back up from 4 to 2. Another local song, Alan Garrity’s ‘I Need Someone’ was in 3rd place, but it had dropped from 2 last week.

Johnny Nash took the climbing honours this week as his ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ moved up 6 from 18 to 12 and this was the only song that made a 4 or more place star rater climb this week.

The faller of the week award went to Don McLean’s ‘Vincent’ which dropped 5 from 11 to 16. This was the second time the song had taken the award.

The Hollies’ ‘Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress’ was the oldest on the chart for a second week and it celebrated this by moving up 2 places from 13 to 11 and becoming the new record holder for the most number of times a song changed its direction of movement in the chart as this was the 10th time it had headed in the opposite direction of what it had with its previous movement. It sat on 18 weeks in the top 20. The Hollies became the 10th act to have seen 11 weeks with the oldest song in the charts having managed 1 week as the oldest with ‘I’m Alive’, 2 weeks with ‘Carrie-Ann’ and 3 weeks each with ‘That’s My Desire’ and ‘Sorry Suzanne’. Their effort this week heralded the 200th week where the oldest in the chart was by a British act.

Middle Of The Road’s run with 2 in the chart came to an end as ‘Samson And Delilah’ dropped off the top 20 this week. This run with 2 had lasted 6 weeks and added to the 7 weeks that they had managed previously in 2 separate runs with 2 different pairing, their total of 13 weeks to date with more than 1 hit in the chart fell agonisingly short of the record to date 14 which our very own Four Jacks & A Jill held. ‘Samson And Delilah’ spent 15 weeks in the charts and peaked at 5.

The Eagles’ first single release ‘Take It Easy’ was the new entry this week. The song was written by Jackson Browne (who would eventually chart on our charts in his own right) with the help of a certain Glenn Frey who was his neighbour. It would give The Eagles a number 12 hit in the US. Browne himself would eventually record a version of the song for his album ‘For Everyman’ and he did release it as a single, but that failed to chart for him, but I guess he doesn’t complain too much about that as the royalty cheques must still be rolling in from his little ditty.

Having finally overtaken the Brits last week for the number of hits in the top 20, the Americans pressed home their advantage and opened the gap to 3 as they accounted for 8 of the top 20 this week while the British only had 5. The locals had 4 with Germany, Greece and Italy supplying the other 3. Overall though, the Brits were still in the lead (just) as they had supplied 323 hits so far compared to the American’s 321, a slender lead of 2.

The Hollies shrugged off the Troggs on the weeks count list to take 3rd place for themselves, their 116 weeks to date putting them 1 ahead of The Troggs causing the latter to fall to 4. John Edmond continued to climb up the local weeks count list as his 33 put him tied 10th with Groep Twee and Murray Campbell. Alan Garrity took 18th place for himself as his 27 weeks put him 1 ahead of The Rising Sons whom he shared 18th place with last week. The Rising Sons were falling rather than rising as they dropped to 19th.

The Hollies also celebrated going past the 1,400 points mark and this put them in 2nd place on the points list, jumping ahead of the Troggs who sat on 1,395. Tom Jones was the only one ahead of The Hollies and he sat 769 points ahead on 2,169.

The average number of weeks the songs in this week’s chart had been with us moved back up over 8 after dropping below this for 1 week. Last week it was 7.95 but now moved up to 8.2.

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