2 July 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 7 Let Your Love Flow  – Bellamy Brothers
2 5 4 Fernando  – ABBA
3 1 13 One Day at a Time  – Marie Gibson
4 4 6 Happy to be on an Island in the Sun  – Demis Roussos
5 3 13 December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)  – Four Seasons
6 9 5 No Charge  – J.J. Barrie
7 6 7 Save Your Kisses for Me  – Brotherhood of Man
8 8 3 Take My Heart  – Pendulum
9 10 5 Miss You Nights  – Cliff Richard
10 7 9 I Love to Love  – Tina Charles
11 13 3 Tomorrow  – David Cassidy
12 15 4 A Glass of Champagne  – Sailor
13 16 3 Charlie  – Rabbitt
14 11 18 I Won’t Give Up  – Bruce Millar
15 17 2 Moody Blue  – Mark James
16 12 8 Forever and Ever  – Slik
17 14 7 Tears on the Telephone  – Gerry Grayson & Debbie
18 20 2 Hurt  – Elvis Presley
19 New 1 Celebrate The Rain  – Julian Laxton Band
20 New 1 That’s the Way  – Lionel Petersen

The Bellamy Brother’s ‘Let Your Love Flow’ took over the number 1 spot from Marie Gibson’s ‘One Day At A Time’ this week after the latter had enjoyed a run at the top of 2 weeks. ‘One Day At A Time’ fell to number 3. ‘Let Your Love Flow’ clocked up the 207th week at the top of the charts for American acts. The significance of this was that it put the Americans level with the British acts for week at 1. The Brits had been ahead of the Americans for the last 50 weeks.

It only took a 3 place climb to grab yourself a climber of the week award and 4 acts were up for this. Abba picked up their 5th such award with ‘Fernando’ moving up from 5 to 2. J.J. Barrie, who had been the ‘bridesmaid’ for the last 2 weeks seeing star raters but not biggest climbers, saw his hit ‘No Charge’ climb from 9 to 6 while Sailor’s ‘A Glass Of Champagne’ jumped from 15 to 12. Lastly Rabbitt’s ‘Charlie’ hopped (sorry) from 17 to 13. There were no star raters this week.

Faller of the week went to Slik’s ‘Forever And Ever’ which dropped 4 from 12 to 16 while Bruce Millar’s ‘I Won’t Give Up’ enjoyed its 18th week on the charts and its 5th as the oldest.

We lost 2 songs from the charts and both were by local acts. The first of these 2 was Gene Rockwell’s ‘Shame on Me’ which lasted 11 weeks in the top 20 and peaked at 10. Rockwell had seen 8 songs chart and this was only his second one to reach double figures for weeks. His only previous hit to manage 10 weeks or more was ‘Ciao’ which also managed 11. ‘Shame On Me’ was his first to go top 10 since his first 3 hits which gave him peaks of 4-4-5 in that order. There were still a couple more hits to come from him. By the way, ‘Shame On Me’ was the second song to chart with the word ‘shame’ in the title, the previous being ‘Shame Shame, Shame’ by Shirley & Company. There would only be 2 more.

We also bid farewell to Caroline du Preez & Tommy Dell’s ‘Sometimes’ which had seen a run of 14 weeks in the charts and peaked at 6. Caroline had only had 1 previous hit and that only went to 17 during a 5 weeks run. For Tommy on the other hand, this was his first hit. We would see another hit by this duet and Tommy would see further solo hits.

Despite losing 2 local songs from the charts, the local hit count was maintained at 7 hits as both the new entries were by South African acts.

Julian Laxton had appeared on the labels of a number of singles that had made our charts so far, usually as engineer and once so far as producer (on Rabbitt’s ‘Charlie’ which was at 13 this week), but this week he and his band made their debut on our charts as artist. ‘Celebrate The Rain’ was written by Laxton along with Patric van Blerk and a certain Trevor Rabin who was enjoying chart success with the aforementioned Rabbitt hit. This was the 6th song to chart where van Blerk had a songwriting credits and the 4th where he is listed as producer.

The second new entry was Lionel Peterson’s 6th song to chart, ‘That’s The Way’. The song was a cover of a Joe Tex number from 1969. Tex’s version made it to number 94 on the Billboard Hot 100 and 46 on the R&B Singles charts in the US. Tex had written the song and he had also penned ‘Hold On To What You Got’ which The Staccatos charted with in 1969.

Elvis joined The Rolling Stones in 6th place on the weeks count list. Both acts were on 109. Further down the list Abba moved into tied 17th place with The Staccatos with their weeks count on 83. On the local list, the only movement on the top 20 was The Bats falling to number 16 as Lionel Peterson, who had shared 15th place with them last week, moved on to 46 weeks while The Bats on 45 dropped the one place.

Weird fact of the week: we had now had 3 weeks in a row where we had at least 1 act in the chart where their names started with every letter from A through to G (Abba, Brotherhood of Man or Bruce Millar, Cliff Richard, Demis Roussos or David Cassidy, Elvis Presley, Four Seasons, Gerry Grayson). We had only seen this 3 times before (a ‘time’ here equals a run of consecutive weeks) and of those 3 times once we had also had an act starting with H.

Youtube playlist:

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25 June 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 12 One Day at a Time  – Marie Gibson
2 2 6 Let Your Love Flow  – Bellamy Brothers
3 3 12 December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)  – Four Seasons
4 6 5 Happy to be on an Island in the Sun  – Demis Roussos
5 11 3 Fernando  – ABBA
6 4 6 Save Your Kisses for Me  – Brotherhood of Man
7 5 8 I Love to Love  – Tina Charles
8 15 2 Take My Heart  – Pendulum
9 9 4 No Charge  – J.J. Barrie
10 8 4 Miss You Nights  – Cliff Richard
11 7 17 I Won’t Give Up  – Bruce Millar
12 10 7 Forever and Ever  – Slik
13 19 2 Tomorrow  – David Cassidy
14 12 6 Tears on the Telephone  – Gerry Grayson & Debbie
15 16 3 A Glass of Champagne  – Sailor
16 20 2 Charlie  – Rabbitt
17 New 1 Moody Blue  – Mark James
18 14 14 Sometimes  – Caroline du Preez & Tommy Dell
19 17 11 Shame on Me  – Gene Rockwell
20 New 1 Hurt  – Elvis Presley

‘One Day At A Time’ by Marie Gibson spent a second week at 1 while The Bellamy Brothers’ ‘Let Your Love Flow’ spent a second week at number 2. ‘One Day At A Time’ was the 3rd number 1 hit so far that had the word ‘one’ in the title. The previous 2 were Marbles’ ‘Only One Woman’ and The Tremeloes’ ‘(Call Me) Number One’.

After being a new entry last week, Pendulum swung into action and saw their hit, ‘Take My Heart’, move up 7 places from 15 to 8 and in doing so it took the climber of the week award. It was the 134th time a local act had brought us the biggest climber.

Abba’s ‘Fernando’, David Cassidy’s ‘Tomorrow’ and Rabbitt’s ‘Charlie’ were the other songs to make a star rater climb of 4 places or more. Taking them in the order they are noted, the first climbed 6 from 11 to 5, the second climbed 6 from 19 to 13 and the third moved up 4 from 20 to 16.

Two local songs shared the faller of the week award and they were ‘Sometimes’ by Caroline du Preez’ (down 4 from 14 to 18) and former chart topper, Bruce Millar’s ‘I Won’t Give Up’ (down 4 from 7 to 11). It was the 3rd time that ‘Sometimes’ had been the faller of the week, picking up the award the previous week and also having done so 8 weeks previously. Millar at least had some comfort from the fact that his song was the oldest in the charts, sitting as it was on 17 weeks and had been the oldest for 4 weeks.

Queen’s ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ left the top 20 after a run of 15 weeks and a peak of 2. This gave Bruce Millar something else to be proud of as his ‘I Won’t Give Up’ had been the song that kept this Queen classic (and widely acknowledged as one of the greatest songs of all time) off the top spot for 3 weeks. ‘Bo Rap’ (as some refer to the song) had been Queen’s first SA chart hit and they would have plenty more opportunities to get to that coveted number 1 slot.

George McCrae’s SA Chart career came to an end with the departure of ‘Honey I (Live My Life For You)’ from the top 20. The song had spent 12 weeks on the chart and peaked at 5 which was exactly the same stats his previous hit, ‘It’s Been So Long’, managed. McCrae was the 14th act to see at least 2 songs have the same weeks and peak with Cliff Richard having seen 3 pairs of songs have the same stat, while The Hollies and Percy Sledge had seen 2 pairs. George McCrae had seen 4 songs chart, spent a total of 56 weeks on the chart and his best peak was 2 which ‘Rock Your Baby’ managed.

The first of the new entries was a song that Elvis had a number 1 hit on the US Country Singles charts with (the last in his lifetime), ‘Moody Blue’. It also reached number 31 on the main Hot 100 charts and 6 in the UK. However, it was the version by the man who wrote the song, Mark James, that charted in SA this week. James, who had also penned Elvis’ ‘Suspicious Minds’, did not chart in either the US or UK with his version but did make number 18 in Rhodesia (as it was then). This was his 4th time in the charts as song writer as he had not only brought us ‘Suspicious Minds’ but was also responsible for The Box Tops 1970 hit ‘Turn On A Dream’ and the 1974 offering from Blue Swede, ‘Hooked On A Feeling’. There had been 349 weeks between Mark James first charting as a song writer and charting as an artist. This was a new record beating the 340 weeks John Lennon took between first charting as a song writer and charting as an artist.

And talking of Elvis, it just so happened that he was the artist on the other new entry this week as his song, ‘Hurt’ entered the charts at 20. The song had originally been an R&B hit for Roy Hamilton in 1955 reaching number 8 on the R&B Singles Charts in the US. In 1961 Timi Yuro took a version to number 4 on the main Hot 100 charts. ‘Hurt’ moved Elvis on to 12 hits to have made our charts which placed him tied 4th with The Bee Gees and Percy Sledge for number of hits to date, 2 behind The Hollies on 14, 4 behind Cliff Richard on 16 and 6 behind leader Tom Jones who was on 18. As he had last been seen on the charts 109 weeks previously, Elvis became the 6th act to see a gap of 100 weeks or more between hits on 2 occasions.

Tina Charles reached the 20 weeks in the chart milestone and was the 28th woman to do so.

Elvis’ new one moved him on to 108 weeks in the charts and this put him tied 7th on the overall weeks list, sharing the spot with The Sweet. Cliff Richard moved 1 ahead of Alan Garrity and Engelbert Humperdinck putting him in 14th place on his own while the other 2 dropped to 15th. Abba moved on to 82 weeks and moved tied 18th with Barbara Ray and Chris Andrews. This meant that Billy Forrest, Manfred Mann and Middle Of The Road dropped off the top 20 of the weeks count list. On the local list we saw Gene Rockwell drawn level with Lauren Copley in 9th place on 54 weeks.

Youtube playlist:

18 June 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 11 One Day at a Time  – Marie Gibson
2 3 5 Let Your Love Flow  – Bellamy Brothers
3 1 11 December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)  – Four Seasons
4 5 5 Save Your Kisses for Me  – Brotherhood of Man
5 4 7 I Love to Love  – Tina Charles
6 10 4 Happy to be on an Island in the Sun  – Demis Roussos
7 6 16 I Won’t Give Up  – Bruce Millar
8 9 3 Miss You Nights  – Cliff Richard
9 15 3 No Charge  – J.J. Barrie
10 7 6 Forever and Ever  – Slik
11 19 2 Fernando  – ABBA
12 14 5 Tears on the Telephone  – Gerry Grayson & Debbie
13 11 12 Honey I (Live My Life For You)  – George McCrae
14 8 13 Sometimes  – Caroline du Preez & Tommy Dell
15 New 1 Take My Heart  – Pendulum
16 20 2 A Glass of Champagne  – Sailor
17 13 10 Shame on Me  – Gene Rockwell
18 12 15 Bohemian Rhapsody  – Queen
19 New 1 Tomorrow  – David Cassidy
20 New 1 Charlie  – Rabbitt

After 4 weeks of The Four Seasons’ ‘December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)’ at the top of the charts, we saw a new number 1 in the form of Marie Gibson’s ‘One Day at a Time’. It took ‘One Day At A Time’ 11 weeks to gain the top spot and this was a new record to date slowest climb to get there. 3 songs (Percy Sledge’s ‘My Special Prayer’, Peter Maffay’s ‘You’ and Dawn & Tony Orlando’s ‘Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree’) had taken 10 weeks to get to 1 previously. This 11 week trip to the top would be the all time record slowest for a local song.

Abba picked up their 4th biggest climber award with an 8 place climb by ‘Fernando’ from 19 to 11. This was the 3rd best climb by an Abba song to date with ‘Hasta Mañana’ managing a 9 place climb and ‘Mamma Mia’ managing 10 places in a week.

Last week’s biggest climber (Demis Roussos’ ‘Happy To be On An Island In The Sun’) and one of last week’s ‘star raters (J.J. Barrie’s ‘No Charge’) were star raters this week with the former moving up 4 from 10 to 6 and the latter climbing 6 from 15 to 9. They were joined by one of the new entries from last week, Sailor’s ‘A Glass Of Champagne’ which moved up 4 from 20 to 16.

The biggest fall this week was 6 places and there were 2 songs that did this. The first being Queen’s ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ which fell from 12 to 18 and Caroline du Preez & Tommy Dell’s ‘Sometimes’ which dropped from 8 to 14.

Bruce Millar’s ‘I Won’t Give Up’ enjoyed its 16th week on the charts and its 3rd as the oldest. It had been 59 weeks since we had last seen a song get to 20 weeks in the charts.

Jean-Claude Borelly’s ‘Dolannes Melodie’ ended its chart run after spending 12 weeks in the top 20 and peaking at 2. In terms of points, this was the 10th best performing instrumental hit to date. By the time the charts finished in 1989 it would have dropped to 14th. This would be Borelly’s only SA chart hit.

‘But I Do’ by Richard Jon Smith became the 40th song to have an equal weeks and peak figure as it left the chart after 9 weeks and a peak of 9. Keeping with a 9 theme, it was the 9th local song to see an equal weeks and peak. 9 was still the most popular figure to have and equal weeks and peak with as 11 songs had managed this. 7 and 8 were in joint second place with 9 times each. There was plenty more to come from Smith.

Last of our leavers was Eric Carmen’s ‘All By Myself’ which spent 7 weeks in the charts and peaked at 9. This had been his first SA chart hit and he had 3 more still to come.

The first of the new entries was ‘Take My Heart’ by Pendulum. This was the local band’s first SA hit and the line-up featured Glenda Hyam who left the band shortly after this to join Clout. The song was based on a piece of music called ‘In A Persian Market’ by British composer Albert Ketelbey who is credit as a song writer alongside George David Weiss, Hugo Peretti, Luigi Creatore. Creatore had brought us ‘Can’t Help Falling In Love’ and Creatore & Weiss also had song writing credits on ‘The Lion Sleeps Tonight’ (presumably for the additional lyrics).

David Cassidy returned to the charts with his 5th hit, ‘Tomorrow’, a cover of the Paul McCartney & Wings song that appeared on the latter’s ‘Wild Life’ album. The song did not appear to chart elsewhere in the world. It had been 36 weeks since we had last seen a song that had some involvement from a Beatle as either artist, songwriter or producer. The previous one was John Lennon as artist on ‘Stand By Me’. Overall we had now seen 30 songs that had such involvement from the Beatles, either as a group or as individuals.

Last of the new entries was the second song by Rabbitt to chart, although this was with a very different line-up to that featured on their 1973 hit, ‘Locomotive Breath’.  Gone were Errol Friedman, Francois Roos, Louis Forer and Cedric Samson and in their place came Duncan Faure, Ronnie Robot and Neil Cloud to join the only member to survive from the 1973 line-up, Trevor Rabin. There was much speculation about who ‘Charlie’ was, but according to Julian Laxton who produced the single, it was Charles Coetzee, the partner of Patric van Blerk. Patric co-wrote ‘Charlie’ with Trevor Rabin and this would his 5th time with writing credits on a charting song. Rabin became the 30th person to chart as a song writer before charting as an artist as we would see a solo hit from him later. There had been a gap of 166 weeks between ‘Locomotive Breath’ leaving the top 20 and ‘Charlie’ entering the charts. This was the 10th biggest gap we had seen for a local act and the 86th time we had seen a gap of 100 weeks or more for any act.

Cliff Richard moved into tied 14th place on the weeks count list with 84 weeks to his name. He shared the place with Alan Garrity and Engelbert Humperdinck. Abba debuted on the top 20 of the overall weeks count list as their 81 put them into tied 20th place with Billy Forrest, Manfred Mann and Middle Of The Road.

Youtube playlist:

11 June 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 10 December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)  – Four Seasons
2 2 10 One Day at a Time  – Marie Gibson
3 5 4 Let Your Love Flow  – Bellamy Brothers
4 4 6 I Love to Love  – Tina Charles
5 9 4 Save Your Kisses for Me  – Brotherhood of Man
6 3 15 I Won’t Give Up  – Bruce Millar
7 10 5 Forever and Ever  – Slik
8 6 12 Sometimes  – Caroline du Preez & Tommy Dell
9 15 2 Miss You Nights  – Cliff Richard
10 18 3 Happy to be on an Island in the Sun  – Demis Roussos
11 8 11 Honey I (Live My Life For You)  – George McCrae
12 7 14 Bohemian Rhapsody  – Queen
13 13 9 Shame on Me  – Gene Rockwell
14 16 4 Tears on the Telephone  – Gerry Grayson & Debbie
15 20 2 No Charge  – J.J. Barrie
16 12 7 All by Myself  – Eric Carmen
17 11 9 But I Do  – Richard Jon Smith
18 14 12 Dolannes Melodie  – Jean-Claude Borelly
19 New 1 Fernando  – ABBA
20 New 1 A Glass of Champagne  – Sailor

The Four Seasons’ ‘December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)’ had now spent as many weeks as there were seasons in their name at 1 while Marie Gibson’s ‘One Day At A Time’ was enjoying a second week at 2.

Vicky Leandros, who had been the only Greek act to chart until Demis Roussos had recently entered the charts, had managed 4 biggest climbers. Roussos opened his account this week with an 8 place climb by ‘Happy to be on an Island in the Sun’ which moved up from 18 to 10. While he still had a way to go to catch up to Leandros in terms of number of biggest climbers, this 8 place climb immediately equalled the best a Greek act had managed to date and (spoiler alert) these 2 would be the biggest climbs we would ever see by a Greek act (Leandos had managed it with ‘The Love in Your Eyes’).

We saw 3 other star rater climbs and they were Brotherhood of Man’s ‘Save Your Kisses For Me’ (the biggest climber 2 weeks back) which moved up 4 from 9 to 5, Cliff Richard’s ‘Miss You Nights’ which climbed 6 from 15 to 9 and J.J. Barrie’s ‘No Charge’ which made a 5 place jump from 20 to 15. It was Cliff’s 9th time with a star rater and he was the 30th act to get to this many.

Richard Jon Smith picked up his 4th faller of the week award with a 6 place drop from 11 to 17 by ‘But I Do’. Smith was the 13th local act to have seen at least 4 biggest fallers.

Bruce Millar’s ‘I Won’t Give Up’ enjoyed its 2nd week as the oldest on the charts and its 15th week overall with us.

Barry Manilow’s ‘I Write The Songs’ was the first of 2 songs to leave the charts this week. It had been with us for 12 weeks and peaked at 5. This was 1 week less and 2 places lower than ‘Mandy’ his only other hit to date. He would grace our charts again.

Bobby Angel saw his weeks total for a song improve. His previous 2 hits (‘The Greatest Christmas Gift’ and ‘Don Junior’) had spent just 2 and 3 weeks in the charts respectively. ‘It’s A Burning Thing’ which left the top 20 this week, managed 9. While being better, this still fell short of the 11 and 17 weeks his first 2 hits had managed. ‘It’s A Burning Thing’ peaked at 15 and this was the worst peak we had seen so far for a song spending 9 weeks in the charts. The next worst was 13 which 5 songs (3 of which were by local acts) had managed.

Abba returned to the chart after an absence of only 4 weeks. Their 7th SA hit was ‘Fernando’ and this put them level with The Seekers at the top of the list for number of hits by acts not from the UK, the US or SA. ‘Fernando’ went to number 1 in Australia (selling over 720,000 unit), Austria, Belgium, Holland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, New Zealand, Mexico, Switzerland and the UK (selling over 500,000 units there). It narrowly missed out on topping the charts in Canada, Finland, Norway, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Sweden, making number 2 on all those charts. In the US it made 13 and topped the Adult Contemporary charts there. The original Swedish lyrics of the song by Stig Anderson were different to the English ones that they recorded. ‘Fernando’ was originally recorded by Frida for a solo album and started off with the title of ‘Tango’ but that was changed at the last minute to ‘Fernando’. The arrival of ‘Fernando’ on the charts improved on last week’s 6 UK number 1’s in the top 20 and ‘Fernando’ was now a record equally 7th. The last time we had seen this many UK chart toppers in the top 20 was back in 1965.

Also joining us was Sailor with ‘A Glass Of Champagne’. Sailor consisted of Norwegian born Georg Kajanus, German born Phil Pickett and British born Henry Marsh and Grant Serpell. Despite their international line-up, they are regarded as a British band. Kranjus who had written the song ‘Flying Machine’ for Cliff Richard was also the writer of ‘A Glass Of Champagne’. The song went to number 2 in the UK and made top 3 in Switzerland, Germany and Holland. ‘Sailor’ gave us the 3rd case of a charting group having the same name as a song as we had seen in the top 20 as a song called ‘Sailor’ by Petula Clark spend time in the charts. The other 2 cases of this we had seen was ‘Waterloo’ (local act name and Abba hit) and ‘Sunny’ (song by Bobby Hebb and the woman who had sung ‘Doctor’s Orders’).

The male domination of the top 20 was beginning to wane as they dropped to below 10 of the top 20 for the first time in 13 weeks, although there were still more solo men in the charts than another type of act as they had 9 of the top 20 with the balance being split between 7 groups, 2 solo female acts and 2 collaborations.

Acts from Sweden moved onto 91 weeks in the chart and this gave them 10th place on the list of weeks by a nation to themselves as the Jamaicans on 90 dropped into 11th place. Abba had now accounted for 80 of those 91 Swedish weeks and they were the 23rd act to reach this milestone.

Cliff Richard moved into tied 16th place on the overall weeks count list, his 83 putting him level with The Staccatos.

Richard Jon Smith moved ahead of Bobby Angel and The Rising Sons with his total on 43. He held on to 17th place on the local weeks count list while the latter 2 on 42 fell into tied 18th place.

With Abba and Slik on the chart together, we experienced the 37th time we had 2 acts whose name was just 4 letters long in the chart together. We had seen 5 weeks when there were 3 such acts in the top 20 and that was when we had a run with Abba, Cher and MFSB in the charts at the same time.

Youtube playlist:

4 June 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 9 December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)  – Four Seasons
2 3 9 One Day at a Time  – Marie Gibson
3 2 14 I Won’t Give Up  – Bruce Millar
4 8 5 I Love to Love  – Tina Charles
5 15 3 Let Your Love Flow  – Bellamy Brothers
6 6 11 Sometimes  – Caroline du Preez & Tommy Dell
7 4 13 Bohemian Rhapsody  – Queen
8 5 10 Honey I (Live My Life For You)  – George McCrae
9 14 3 Save Your Kisses for Me  – Brotherhood of Man
10 12 4 Forever and Ever  – Slik
11 11 8 But I Do  – Richard Jon Smith
12 9 6 All by Myself  – Eric Carmen
13 10 8 Shame on Me  – Gene Rockwell
14 7 11 Dolannes Melodie  – Jean-Claude Borelly
15 New 1 Miss You Nights  – Cliff Richard
16 16 3 Tears on the Telephone  – Gerry Grayson & Debbie
17 17 9 It’s a Burning Thing  – Bobby Angel
18 20 2 Happy to be on an Island in the Sun  – Demis Roussos
19 13 12 I Write the Songs  – Barry Manilow
20 New 1 No Charge  – J.J. Barrie

‘December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)’ by The Four Seasons was the number 1 song for a 3rd week running. Marie Gibson’s ‘One Day At A Time’ moved up 1 from 3 to 2, swapping places with another local song and previous chart topper, Bruce Millar’s ‘I Won’t Give Up’.

The Bellamy Brothers picked up the climber of the week award with a 10 place climb from 15 to 5. This was the 65th time a song had climbed 10 or more places in a week. Tina Charles’ ‘I Love To Love’ and Brotherhood Of Man’s ‘Save Your Kisses For Me’ were the only other star raters with the former moving up 4 from 8 to 4 and the latter climbing 5 from 14 to 9. This was Tina’s 5th time with a star rater having managed it 3 times with her previous hit, ‘You Set My Heart On Fire’ and now twice with ‘I Love To Love’.

Jean-Claude Borelly’s ‘Dolannes Melodie’ was the faller of the week with a 7 place drop from 7 to 14. This was the 28th time an instrumental had been the faller of the week.

There were 2 songs that left the charts this week and both were by local acts. Jonathan Butler’s ‘I’ll Be Home’ had lasted just 3 weeks in the charts and peaked at 16. This was the final song of his to chart. His 2 previous hits had both made the top 5 with ‘I Love How You Love Me’ peaking at 4 and ‘Please Stay’ making it to his best peak of 2. In total he had clocked up 27 weeks which at the time was the tied 30th highest for a local act.

We also said goodbye to the song that had been the oldest on last week’s chart, Flood’s ‘Let Me Into Your Life’. It had been with us for 17 weeks and spent 3 of those at number 1. This would be their only SA chart hit. The song that took over as the oldest was the same song that had taken over the top spot from ‘Let Me Into Your Life’ and that was Bruce Millar’s ‘I Won’t Give Up’ which was sitting on 14 weeks.

New to the charts was Cliff Richard’s ‘Miss You Nights’ which was his 16th SA hit. He still sat 2nd overall on the list of number of hits by an artist, 2 behind leader Tom Jones who was on 18. In contrast, Cliff had by this date had 66 UK hits with ‘Miss You Nights’ being one of them, peaking as it did at 15. It managed to get to 10 in Holland, 17 in Belgium and scraped a peak of 100 in Australia. ‘Miss You Nights’ was a cover of a song recorded by the songwriter Dave Townsend, but his version was never released. In 1994 Cliff released a double A-sided single with it and ‘All I Have To Do Is Dream’ which made 14 in the UK. The song resurfaced again in 2003 when Westlife released it also as a double a-sided single with ‘Tonight’. That version got to 3 in the UK. In 2006 the listeners to BBC’s Radio 2 voted it their favourite Cliff song of all time. It had been 186 weeks since Cliff was last seen on our charts and this was the 35th biggest gap we had seen to date and the 84th time the gap had been 100 weeks or more.

The second new entry was J.J. Barrie’s ‘No Charge’ and was the 26th song by a Canadian to chart in SA. Canada sat 4th on the list of hits by acts from a nation with only the big 3 (US, UK and SA) above them. They were 8 hits ahead of the next nation on the list, Germany. ‘No Charge’ was written by Harlan Howard and was first recorded by Melba Montgomery whose version topped the US Country Singles charts. Barrie didn’t manage to chart in the US with his version, but got to number 1 on the UK charts, knocking Abba’s ‘Fernando’ from the top spot before The Wurzel’s ‘Combine Harverster’ dislodged it a week later.

Cliff Richard’s new entry moved him on to 82 weeks in the charts and he now sat tied 18th on the weeks count list alongside Barbara Ray and Chris Andrews and this was the first time in 19 weeks that we had seen any movement in the top 20 of the overall weeks count list. Gene Rockwell’s week count moved on to 51 and he held on to 10th place on the local list while The Dealians on 50 weeks dropped into 11th place. Bobby Angel and Richard Jon Smith moved into tied 17th place on the local list alongside The Rising Sons with their totals on 42.

We now had 8 songs on the charts which had topped the UK, the US or both charts with ‘No Charge’ moving the total up 1.

Youtube playlist:

28 May 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)  – Four Seasons
2 2 13 I Won’t Give Up  – Bruce Millar
3 3 8 One Day at a Time  – Marie Gibson
4 5 12 Bohemian Rhapsody  – Queen
5 6 9 Honey I (Live My Life For You)  – George McCrae
6 7 10 Sometimes  – Caroline du Preez & Tommy Dell
7 4 10 Dolannes Melodie  – Jean-Claude Borelly
8 10 4 I Love to Love  – Tina Charles
9 11 5 All by Myself  – Eric Carmen
10 12 7 Shame on Me  – Gene Rockwell
11 9 7 But I Do  – Richard Jon Smith
12 14 3 Forever and Ever  – Slik
13 8 11 I Write the Songs  – Barry Manilow
14 20 2 Save Your Kisses for Me  – Brotherhood of Man
15 19 2 Let Your Love Flow  – Bellamy Brothers
16 18 2 Tears on the Telephone  – Gerry Grayson & Debbie
17 15 8 It’s a Burning Thing  – Bobby Angel
18 13 17 Let Me Into Your Life  – Flood
19 16 3 I’ll be Home  – Jonathan Butler
20 New 1 Happy to be on an Island in the Sun  – Demis Roussos

‘December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)’ by The Four Seasons enjoyed a second week at the top of the chart with the previous chart topper, Bruce Millar’s ‘I Won’ Give Up’, unmoved at 2. Marie Gibson’s ‘One Day At A Time’ at 3 was also unmoved.

Brotherhood of Man’s ‘Save Your Kisses For Me’ was the climber of the week moving up 6 from 20 to 14. The Bellamy Brother’s ‘Let Your Love Flow’ was the only other star rater as it climbed 4 from 19 to 15.

There were 2 songs that made the biggest fall this week and they were Flood’s ‘Let Me Into Your Life’ which dropped 5 from 13 to 18 and Barry Manilow’s ‘I Write The Songs’ which fell 5 from 8 into the 13th place that ‘Let Me Into Your Life’ had just vacated. ‘Let Me Into Your Life’ was enjoying its 7th week as the oldest on the charts and had clocked up 17 weeks in total.

We only lost 1 song from the top 20 and that was Tony Christie’s ‘Drive Safely Darlin’ which had enjoyed a run of 10 weeks and peaked at 8. This brought to an end the SA chart career of Mr Christie. He had seen 4 songs chart, clocked up a total of 40 weeks and seen a best peak of 2 which ‘I Did What I Did For Maria’ managed.

The only new entry was the first song by a Greek artist to chart that was not by Vicky Leandros. Demis Roussos’ ‘Happy To Be On An Island In The Sun’ was the 5th song in total by a Greek artist which followed after the 4 hits Leandros had had. Roussos started off his musical career as a member of Aphrodite’s Child alongside Vangelis (remember the ‘Chariots of Fire’ theme tune?) before forging a solo path. ‘Happy To Be On An Island In The Sun’ was produced by George Petsilas who had been married to another well-known Greek singer, Nana Mouskouri. The song made it to number 5 in the UK. Greece moved into tied 12th place on the list of number of hits by acts from a nation, sharing the spot with Italy.

Gene Rockwell became the 48th act overall and the 11th local act to reach the 50 weeks in the chart milestone while The Four Seasons hit the 20 week mark. Rockwell sat tied 10th on the local weeks count list, level with The Dealians.

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21 May 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 7 December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)  – Four Seasons
2 1 12 I Won’t Give Up  – Bruce Millar
3 6 7 One Day at a Time  – Marie Gibson
4 4 9 Dolannes Melodie  – Jean-Claude Borelly
5 3 11 Bohemian Rhapsody  – Queen
6 5 8 Honey I (Live My Life For You)  – George McCrae
7 8 9 Sometimes  – Caroline du Preez & Tommy Dell
8 12 10 I Write the Songs  – Barry Manilow
9 9 6 But I Do  – Richard Jon Smith
10 17 3 I Love to Love  – Tina Charles
11 11 4 All by Myself  – Eric Carmen
12 13 6 Shame on Me  – Gene Rockwell
13 7 16 Let Me Into Your Life  – Flood
14 18 2 Forever and Ever  – Slik
15 19 7 It’s a Burning Thing  – Bobby Angel
16 20 2 I’ll be Home  – Jonathan Butler
17 10 10 Drive Safely Darlin’  – Tony Christie
18 New 1 Tears on the Telephone  – Gerry Grayson & Debbie
19 New 1 Let Your Love Flow  – Bellamy Brothers
20 New 1 Save Your Kisses for Me  – Brotherhood of Man

The Four Seasons’ ‘December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)’ became the 15th song to top the UK, US and SA charts as it took over the top spot from Bruce Millar’s ‘I Won’t Give Up’. The latter had enjoyed a run of 6 weeks at the number 1 spot. It dropped to 2.

Tina Charles had one biggest climber under her belt, but that was as part of 5,000 Volts. This week she picked up her first solo one as ‘I Love To Love’ moved up 7 from 17 to 10 to take the award.

Unlike last week where the biggest climber, which also moved up 7 places, was the only star rater in the week, there were 4 other star raters this week. These were Barry Manilow’s ‘I Write The Songs’ (up 4 to 8), Slik’s ‘Forever And Ever’ (up 4 to 14), Bobby Angel’s ‘It’s A Burning Thing’ (up 4 to 15) and Jonathan Butler’s ‘I’ll Be Home’ (up 4 to 16). It was Bobby Angel’s 6th time with a star rater and he was the 10th local act to reach this many.

The faller of the week was Tony Christie’s ‘Drive Safely Darlin’ which dropped 7 from 10 to 17. It was his 4th time with the award. This was the 25th time we had seen the climber and faller move the same number of places and this figure had been 7 or greater.

Flood’s ‘Let Me Into Your Life’ enjoyed a 6th week as the oldest on the charts. It was sitting on 16 weeks.

We lost 3 songs from the chart this week, the first of which was Conway Twitty’s ‘Don’t Cry Joni’. It had been with us for 7 weeks and peaked at 13. Of his 2 solo hits, this was his best performer, but it didn’t do nearly as well as his duet with Loretta Lynne, ‘As Soon As I hang Up The Phone’, which managed 16 weeks and peaked at 1. This brought to an end Twitty’s SA chart career which consisted of 3 hits, 25 weeks and 5 weeks at 1 with his aforementioned duet.

Tina Charles’ time with 2 hits in the charts came to an end after just 2 weeks as ‘You Set My Heart On Fire’ was the second of the 3 songs to leave the top 20. It managed 12 weeks and a peak of 4 which was better than the 9 weeks and peak of 10 that the 5,000 Volts hit that she sang on, ‘I’m On Fire’, managed.

We also saw the longest run with 2 songs by French acts in the top 20 come to an end as Pierre Groscolas’ ‘Lady Lay’ left after 10 weeks and a peak of 4. This 8 week run would the all time record for having 2 French acts on the charts at the same time. We had had 1 pairing before this and would see 1 more.

The first of the new entries was Gerry Grayson & Debbie with their song ‘Tears On The Telephone’. The song was a cover of a song by Frenchman Claude François who had originally recorded it in French as ‘Le Téléphone Pleure’ but when he translated it into English, he scored a number 35 hit in the UK with it. Hot Chocolate also scored a UK hit with a song with the same title, but that was a different one. Greyson had been on our charts once before with his number 13 hit, ‘Don’t Break This Heart’. The Debbie in question was Greyson’s daughter.

The second new entry was by David and Homer Bellamy, better known as The Bellamy Brothers. ‘Let Your Love Flow’ was written by a former roadie for Neil Diamond, a guy called Larry E. Williams. The song was a worldwide hit, topping the charts in Austria, Germany, Switzerland and the US and going top 10 in Belgium (#6), Canada (#3), Ireland (#3), Holland (#6), New Zealand (#2), Norway (#2), Sweden (#2) and the UK (#7). In 2008 the song made it back on to the UK charts following its use in an advert for Barclaycard and climbed to 21 on that occasion.

Our final new entry was Brotherhood Of Man’s first SA hit, ‘Save Your Kisses For Me’. This was the 5th song to chart in SA that had won the Eurovision Song Competition and continued a recent trend of letting a Eurovision winner chart every 2 years as we had now had the winners from 1970, 1972, 1974 and 1976 chart, but those for 1971, 1973 and 1975 hadn’t. The only one out of kilter was the 1967 winner, Sandie Shaw’s ‘Puppet On A String’ which did make our charts. ‘Save All Your Kisses For Me’ topped the UK charts as well as those in Holland, Belgium and Norway, just missing out in Germany and Switzerland where it made it to number 2. In the US it managed to get to 27. One of the songwriters, Tony Hillier, had also had song writing credits on Cliff Richards’ 1971 hit in SA, ‘Sunny Honey Girl’.

We now had 9 local songs on the charts and it had been back in January 1974 when we had last had this many. This was 121 weeks previously. It had been 123 weeks since the local acts had occupied at least half of the top 20.

Three acts celebrated reaching the 40 weeks in the charts mark and they were Richard Jon Smith, Bobby Angel and Tony Christie. 71 acts in total had now reached this milestone so far with 19 of those being local acts.

Richard Jon Smith and Bobby Angel sat tied 18th on the local weeks count list and were unmoved there while Gene Rockwell moved level 11th with Maria on 49 weeks.

George McCrae became the 44th act to see their points total reach the 600 mark. McCrae breezed past this level and sat on 606 which placed him 42nd overall.

With ‘Let your Love Flow’ topping the US charts and ‘Save Your Kisses for Me’ topping the UK charts, we now had 7 songs on the top 20 that had topped the charts in either or both the UK and the US. It had been just over a year since we had last seen this many UK/US chart toppers in the charts when on 16 May 1975 there were 8.

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