26 February 1971

no_matter_badfinger

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 3 6 No Matter What  – Badfinger
2 1 6 Knock Three Times  – Dawn
3 2 11 I Hear You Knockin’  – Dave Edmunds
4 5 4 Rose Garden  – Lynn Anderson
5 4 12 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
6 6 8 Gypsy Woman  – Brian Hyland
7 9 9 Mango Mango  – Tidal Wave
8 7 10 See Me, Feel Me  – Who
9 11 4 Mendocino  – Michael Holm
10 16 3 Sailing  – Fuzz
11 10 12 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
12 18 2 Do It  – Neil Diamond
13 20 2 Home  – Dave Mills
14 8 17 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
15 17 2 Apeman  – Kinks
16 19 2 Give Me More  – Mick Jade
17 New 1 Immigrant Song  – Led Zeppelin
18 New 1 A Summer Prayer for Peace  – Archies
19 12 8 Sing Out Glory  – Bernie Brown
20 14 4 River Deep, Mountain High  – Four Tops & The Supremes

‘Knock Three Times’ by Dawn only managed to notch up two weeks the top of the charts as this week it was dethroned by Badfinger’s ‘No Matter What’ which climbed 2 from 3 to reach the top spot. It was the 24th song so far to move into pole position from number 3 with 22 further songs claiming the top spot from number 4 or further down the charts. ‘Knock Three Times’ fell to number 2. ‘No Matter What’ had the distinction of being the 50th song by a British act to top our charts. The Brits were 8 number 1’s ahead of acts from the US.

Dave Mills picked up his 3rd biggest climber award as ‘Home’ took the honours moving up 7 places from 20 to 13. Only ‘Theresa’, which managed an 8 place climb in a week, had had a bigger jump for Mills than ‘Home’s 7.

Another local act brought us 1 of the 2 other star raters this week and that was Fuzz’s ‘Sailing’ which moved up 6 from 16 to 10. Also moving up 6, and the only other star rater this week, was Neil Diamond’s ‘Do It’. Diamond had now seen 6 star rater climbs as an artist. He had also seen a further 5 star rater climbs where his name appeared in the song writing credits of a song.

Bernie Brown brought us the biggest faller as ‘Sing Out Glory’ fell 7 from 12 to 19. This was the 10th time we had seen a local act take biggest climber and biggest faller in the same week.

Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ entered its 17th week in the chart and enjoyed its second as the oldest in the top 20. To date we had only seen 27 songs reach 17 weeks in the charts with 18 of them going on to see further weeks.

There were 2 songs that didn’t make it from last week’s chart to this week. The first was Christie’s ‘San Bernadino’ which had a run of 9 weeks and peaked at 7. Along with their hit, ‘Yellow River’, this would be the sum total of Christie’s SA chart action. They had clocked up a total of 21 weeks, with ‘Yellow River’ spending a week at the top of the charts to be their best performer.

We also bid farewell to Wanda Arletti’s ‘Zanzibar’ which spent 13 weeks on the charts, narrowly missing out on the number 1 spot as it spent a week at 2, kept at bay by Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’. ‘Zanzibar’ would be Wanda’s only SA chart hit.

Led Zeppelin’s second SA chart hit was the first of the 2 new entries this week. Following the success of ‘Whole Lotta Love’, ‘Immigrant Song’ entered the chart at 17. It was written by band members Robert Plant and Jimmy Page while in Iceland as part of their 1970 tour. Page is also listed as taking production credits. It would get to number 16 in the US on the Billboard Hot 100 (number 8 on alternate US chart listing, Cash Box) and go to number 4 in Canada. The song would not chart in the UK where they did not see a chart hit on the singles chart until 1997, probably due to their reluctance to release singles.

The second new entry was a song which mentions South Africa in its lyrics, The Archies ‘A Summer Prayer For Peace’. The lyrics of the song list a number of countries from around the world then gives their population size. I may be open to correction, but this is possibly the only song to chart by a non-local act which mentions ‘South Africa’ in the lyrics. There would be at least 1 local song that did this. ‘A Summer Prayer For Peace’ was The Archies’ 8th SA chart hit and this placed them tied 10th overall for hit count, a tally they shared with 6 other acts. The song was written by Jeff Barry and he moved 1 ahead of Barry Gibb and Geoff Stephens with his 14 hits to date and sat 3rd behind Barry Mason on 15 and Les Reed on 17 on the number of hits by a song writer list. ‘A Summer Prayer For Peace’ would not chart on any of the other major nation’s charts but would see a peak of 4 in what was then Rhodesia.

The local acts reach a milestone this week as the weeks count for them moved past the 1,000 mark. With 6 local songs in the chart at the moment, their total was actually 1,001. If one assumes that the weeks accumulate from the top of the chart downwards, then it would be Mick Jade’s ‘Give Me More’ that would have the honour of clocking up our 1,000th week.

There was no movement on the top 20 of the weeks count list with none of the acts in this week’s top 20 featuring in the top 20 weeks count. We did see some movement on the local weeks count list with Tidal Wave moving tied 12th with Ken J. Larkin with both acts sitting on 25 weeks.

Youtube playlist:

19 February 1971

dawn_knock

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 5 Knock Three Times  – Dawn
2 2 10 I Hear You Knockin’  – Dave Edmunds
3 5 5 No Matter What  – Badfinger
4 3 11 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
5 8 3 Rose Garden  – Lynn Anderson
6 4 7 Gypsy Woman  – Brian Hyland
7 9 9 See Me, Feel Me  – Who
8 6 16 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
9 10 8 Mango Mango  – Tidal Wave
10 7 11 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
11 17 3 Mendocino  – Michael Holm
12 11 7 Sing Out Glory  – Bernie Brown
13 12 13 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
14 19 3 River Deep, Mountain High  – Four Tops & The Supremes
15 13 9 San Bernadino  – Christie
16 20 2 Sailing  – Fuzz
17 New 1 Apeman  – Kinks
18 New 1 Do It  – Neil Diamond
19 New 1 Give Me More  – Mick Jade
20 New 1 Home  – Dave Mills

‘Knock Three Times’ by Dawn spent its second week at the top of the charts with the previous number 1, Dave Edmunds’ ‘I Hear You Knockin’ was unmoved at 2 since vacating the top spot. This was the 22nd song to manage spending at least 2 weeks at 2 after falling from number 1. Of these 22, 1 had not spent its 2 weeks at 2 immediately after falling from 1, and 3 had gone on to spend 3 weeks at 2 immediately after vacating the top spot.

Michael Holm’s ‘Mendocino’ became the 5th song by a German act to be the biggest climber as it moved up 6 from 17 to 11. Holm had taken the honour once before with ‘Mademoiselle Ninette’ and was now the first German to have 2 biggest climbers to his name.

The Four Tops and The Supremes’ collaborative cover of ‘River Deep Mountain High’ was 1 of 2 other star raters this week as it moved up 5 from 19 to 14 while Fuzz’s ‘Sailing’ was the other star rater moving up 4 from 20 to 16.

The Partridge Family experienced their first biggest faller as ‘I Think I Love You’ dropped 3 from 7 to 10 to take the award. It was their first time taking this particular honour.

We saw 4 songs leave the chart this week, the first of which was The Invaders’ ‘There’s A Light, There’s A Way’ which had only been with us for 3 weeks during which time it peaked at 18. This was the lowest peak of their three hits to date, but did complete a series as the weeks count for their 3 hits that read 5-4-3. We would not see the band on our charts again, although lead singer for part of their SA Chart career, Lionel Petersen, would see solo hits make the top 20. In total they managed 12 weeks with the peak of 10 which ‘Shockwave’ managing, being their best.

Fellow local act, The Rising Sons, also left the charts as ‘Cry Blue Bird Cry’ fell off the top 20 after a run of 5 weeks and a peak of 14. The weeks equalled those of their only other hit to date, ‘Stand Up For The Lady’, but the peak was 1 place lower than that of its predecessor.  Unlike The Invaders, though, we were not done with The Rising Sons just yet.

Chris Andrews saw his SA chart career as an artist come to an end as ‘Yo Yo’ dropped off the charts after 12 weeks and a peak of 7. Of the 6 hits he had manged, this was the only one not to go top 5 and in fact, he had managed a remarkable 4 chart toppers. He had spent a total of 82 weeks in the charts and sat 10th on the weeks count list. His 4 chart toppers spent 13 weeks at the number 1 spot in total and this placed him 3rd to date for weeks at 1. While his SA chart career as an artist was finished, we would still see his name in the song writing credits of future hits.

Last to leave was Neil Diamond’s ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ which had enjoyed a run of 17 weeks with us, 4 of which were at the number 1 position.

The Kinks’ 7th hit to date, ‘Apeman’ was the first of the new entries. The song would be their 14th to make the US Hot 100, but would only manage a peak of 45 there. In the UK, where it was their 18th hit, it was far more successful, getting to number 5 and was their 10th to make the top 5. It was the 8th hit to date on our charts for Ray Davies as a song writer as, apart from the 7 Kinks songs so far, he had also had writing credits on ‘Death of a Clown’ which his brother, Dave Davies had had a hit with.

Neil Diamond became the 11th act to replace himself on the charts as the same week his hit, ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ left the top 20, we saw him have a new entry in the shape of ‘Do It’. This was Diamond’s 4th hit as an artist and 8th as a song writer. The song was not a huge success in the 2 major music markets of the world, failing to chart in the UK and only making it to number 36 in the US. It did see top 20 action in The Netherlands (#16) and Belgium (#15) and was very successful in what was then Rhodesia where it went to number 2. The departure of ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ opened the way for Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ to take over as the oldest in the charts. It was on 16 weeks.

Mick Jade brought us the 3rd of the new entries. Apart from being the only act to share a first name and the first 2 letters of a surname with Mick Jagger, Jade would write the song himself while a certain Billy Forrest would take production credits. Possibly one of Jade’s best known songs was the theme tune to the very popular TV show ‘The Villagers’ which, although credited to him, the vocals were apparently by a black man called Ben Masinga whom Jade had to smuggle into the SABC studio to record the vocals as the powers that be back then would not have accepted the song if they knew it was a black man singing.

Dave Mills’ 4th hit to date, ‘Home’ was the last of the 4 new entries this week. The song was co-written by Terry Dempsey and Robin Netcher. Dempsey had had song writing credits on all 4 of Mills’ hits so far while Netcher was on 3, only missing out on ‘Theresa’ but did have arranger credits on that one. Dempsey crept closer to the top 5 of the number of hits by a song writer list as his 12 to date placed him 6th, 1 behind Geoff Stephens, Jeff Barry and Barry Gibb.

It was interesting to note that while we had 4 songs leave the charts and 4 new entries, the nationality count of the top 20 was unchanged as we exchanged like for like – The UK’s Kinks replacing fellow countryman Chris Andrews (clocking up the 260th hit by a British act) while Neil Diamond replaced himself. Mills and Jade were the 2 local acts to take over from the departing Rising Sons and The Invaders and kept us at a record to date level of 7 local hits.

Dave Mills celebrate a half century of weeks in the charts, but his 50 weeks would not move him up the local weeks count list where he sat 3rd, 18 weeks behind second placed Four Jacks & A Jill. Tidal Wave, on the other hand, did move up the local weeks count list as their 24 weeks to date placed them tied 13th with Al Debbo.

Youtube playlist:

12 February 1971

dawn_knock

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 3 4 Knock Three Times  – Dawn
2 1 9 I Hear You Knockin’  – Dave Edmunds
3 2 10 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
4 4 6 Gypsy Woman  – Brian Hyland
5 7 4 No Matter What  – Badfinger
6 6 15 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
7 5 10 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
8 16 2 Rose Garden  – Lynn Anderson
9 13 8 See Me, Feel Me  – Who
10 11 7 Mango Mango  – Tidal Wave
11 12 6 Sing Out Glory  – Bernie Brown
12 8 12 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
13 10 8 San Bernadino  – Christie
14 9 17 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
15 15 12 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews
16 14 5 Cry Blue bird Cry  – Rising Sons
17 17 2 Mendocino  – Michael Holm
18 18 3 There’s a Light, There’s a Way  – Invaders
19 20 2 River Deep, Mountain High  – Four Tops & The Supremes
20 New 1 Sailing  – Fuzz

Dawn’s ‘Knock Three Times’ became the 11th song to top our charts that would also top the UK and US charts. However, it had not yet caught on in the UK and would only get to number 1 there in the May of ’71. It deposed Dave Edmunds’ ‘I Hear You Knockin’ from our number 1 spot after the latter had only been there for 1 week. Edmund’s hit dropped to number 2. ‘Knock Three Times’ brought the weeks at 1 by American acts to the 100 mark. The Brits still led the way having occupied the top spot for a total of 125 weeks.

Lynn Anderson took the climber of the week award with her hit ‘Rose Garden’ moving up 8 places from 16 to 8. This was the 13th time an American woman had taken the honours if you include the 2 times Nancy Sinatra managed it with her duet with her dad Frank (11th time excluding the duet).

Joining Lynne with a star rater climb this weeks was The Who’s ‘See Me Feel Me’ which moved up 4 from 13 to 9. This was their 4th time with a star rater and 2 of their previous star raters had also been the biggest climbers in those weeks.

Neil Diamond had clocked up 34 weeks before this one and had so far not seen a biggest faller. This week, ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ gave him his first such award as the song fell 5 places from 9 to 14 to take the honours. The 34 weeks without taking biggest faller was the tied 4th longest period so far that any act had managed. Tommy Roe had achieved a similar feat while Manfred Mann had managed 36 weeks, The Tremeloes had a run of 44 weeks and The Seekers held what would be the all-time record of 57 weeks. Despite breaking his run without the biggest faller, Diamond could take some comfort from the fact that ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ was still the oldest on the chart, enjoying its 17th week with us and 4th as the oldest.

There was just 1 song that left the charts this week and that was R. Dean Taylor’s ‘Indiana Wants Me’ which had been with us for 13 weeks and peaked at 3. This brought to a close Taylor’s time in our charts. He had enjoyed having 2 hits with us, spent a total of 19 weeks in the top 20 and the peak of 3 with ‘Indiana Wants Me’ was the best he managed.

The new entry was ‘Sailing’ by a local band called Fuzz. This was not a cover of the well-known Rod Stewart song (that was still over 4 years away from being a hit on our charts) but was rather a ditty written by John Galanakis and Kevin Kruger, both of whom were members of the band. Kruger would go on to work with Hot R.S and Trevor Rabin. He also (if the internet is to be believed) produced some of Bles Bridges work! Usually the arrival of the Fuzz means bad news, especially if you are involved in criminal activity, but here it was good news for the local scene as we now had a record to date equalling 7 local acts in the top 20. We had last seen this level of locals back in the December of 1967, 162 week previously. Peter Lotis, who had already seen 2 hits as an artist, produced the track. For those of you interested in law enforcement, you will happy to know that the South African Fuzz arrived on the scene 478 weeks before the UK Police did (when ‘Message In A Bottle’ entered the charts in April 1980).

With the US acts only having 6 hits on the top 20 and the UK ones 5, this was the 6th time we had seen more local acts in the top 20 than those from America or Britain.

This week saw Christie become the 77th act to reach the 20 weeks in the chart milestone. So far 29 British acts, 27 Americans, 17 South Africans, 2 Canadians and one act from Jamaica and one from Australia had managed this.

Chris Andrews pulled 1 week clear of Manfred Mann, his 82 to date giving him 10th spot on the weeks count list to himself while Manfred Mann dropped to 11. On the local list Tidal Wave shook off Hilary and Carike Keuzenkamp to have 14th place to themselves with 23 weeks under their belt.

For the second week running we saw the acts on the top 3 songs all start with the same letter (Dawn, Dave Edmunds, Dealians – was this known as D-Day?). This was only the 4th time we had seen this and so far we had never seen the top 4 have the same starting letter.

Youtube playlist:

5 February 1971

edmunds_knockin

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 8 I Hear You Knockin’  – Dave Edmunds
2 1 9 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
3 8 3 Knock Three Times  – Dawn
4 5 5 Gypsy Woman  – Brian Hyland
5 4 9 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
6 3 14 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
7 10 3 No Matter What  – Badfinger
8 7 11 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
9 6 16 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
10 9 7 San Bernadino  – Christie
11 12 6 Mango Mango  – Tidal Wave
12 13 5 Sing Out Glory  – Bernie Brown
13 14 7 See Me, Feel Me  – Who
14 15 4 Cry Blue bird Cry  – Rising Sons
15 11 11 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews
16 New 1 Rose Garden  – Lynn Anderson
17 New 1 Mendocino  – Michael Holm
18 20 2 There’s a Light, There’s a Way  – Invaders
19 16 13 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
20 New 1 River Deep, Mountain High  – Four Tops & The Supremes

We had a new number 1 this week and it was the 110th song to top the charts. Dave Edmunds’ ‘I Hear You Knockin’ took over the top spot from The Dealians’ ‘Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow’ which had enjoyed a 3 week stint in pole position. The local song dropped to number 2.

Not only was there knocking going on at the top of the charts, but also at number 3 as Dawn’s ‘Knock Three Times’ moved up 5 into that position and in so doing took the biggest climber award for a second week running. It was the only song to manage a star rater climb this week.

Chris Andrews’ ‘Yo Yo’ took the biggest faller award for a second time as it dropped 6 from 9 to 15. It had last been the biggest faller 4 weeks previously, however we had seen songs with gaps of 6, 7 and a record to date 8 weeks between biggest faller awards. Tom Jones’ ‘I’m Coming Home’ was the only one to have seen the 8 week gap.

Neil Diamond’s ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ clocked up its 16th week in the top 20 and this was its 3rd as the oldest on the chart.

There were 3 songs that left the charts this week, the first of which was ‘The Witch’ by German band The Rattles. The song had enjoyed a spell of 5 weeks with us and a peak of 13. This would be the only SA chart entry we would see from these guys.

Desmond Dekker’s SA Chart career came to an end with the departure of ‘You Can Get It If You Really Want’ from the top 20. The song had spent 9 weeks with us and peaked at 4, the best figures for any of his 3 hits. In total he spent 21 weeks in the top 20.

Last to go was Matthew’s Southern Comfort’s ‘Woodstock’. It lasted 12 weeks in the charts and peaked at 3. Like The Rattles, this would be Matthew’s Southern Comfort’s only SA chart hit.

The first new entry was Lynn Anderson’s ‘Rose Garden’. The song went to number 3 on both sides of the Atlantic and topped the charts in Belgium, Germany, Norway, Switzerland, Canada, Finland, Australia, New Zealand and what was then Rhodesia. Apart  from topping the main charts in those countries it would also get to number 1 on the US and Canadian Country singles charts. The song was written by Joe South who had charted as an artist in SA in 1969 with ‘Games People Play’. This was South’s 4 chart hit as song writer as, apart from penning his own hit, had also been behind Billy Joe Royal’s 1965 hit, ‘Down By The Boondocks’ and Deep Purple’s ‘Hush’ from 1968.

Michael Holm became the first German act to see a second hit make the charts as his ‘Mendocino’ was the second of the new entries. Overall this was the 6th song by a German act to chart. The song was written by Doug Sahm who was the leader of The Sir Douglas Quintet and their version of the song would top the charts in Switzerland and go to number 2 in Germany. It would also go to number 27 in the US in 1969. Holm’s version nearly matched the performance of the original in his native Germany, but would peak 1 place lower, getting to number 3 there.

The final new entry was originally a hit for Ike & Tina Turner back in 1966. ‘River Deep Mountain High’ was produced by the legendary Phil Spector for the husband and wife team and would give them a number 3 hit in the UK. The version that made our charts was one that paired 2 Motown greats, The Supremes and The Four Tops although Diana Ross had by that time left The Supremes. The song was written by Phil Spector, Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich. Of these 3, Barry sat highest on the hits count list for song writers with 13 hits to his name. This put him tied 3rd with Barry Gibb and Geoff Stephens while Barry Mason on 15 and Les Reed on 17 sat ahead of them at 2 and 1 respectively. For Spector it was a second hit as song writer and a 3rd for Greenwich. The Supremes/Four Tops version would go to number 11 in the UK and 14 in the US. It was produced by Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson who would have a hit with ‘Solid’ many years later.

With Michael Holm’s new entry this week, Germany moved 1 hit ahead of France, Ireland and Spain and took 7th place on the hits count by nationality list. The US still led the way with 276 to their credit with the Brits 17 behind on 259. Local acts had clocked up a total of 121 so far.

Chris Andrews moved back into the top 10 of the weeks count list, his 81 to date putting him tied 10th with Manfred Mann. On the local front, Tidal Wave moved on to 22 weeks and were now tied 14th with Carike Keuzenkamp and Hilary.

Youtube playlist:

29 January 1971

dealians_look_out

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
2 3 7 I Hear You Knockin’  – Dave Edmunds
3 2 13 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
4 4 8 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
5 7 4 Gypsy Woman  – Brian Hyland
6 5 15 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
7 6 10 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
8 18 2 Knock Three Times  – Dawn
9 8 6 San Bernadino  – Christie
10 19 2 No Matter What  – Badfinger
11 12 10 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews
12 16 5 Mango Mango  – Tidal Wave
13 17 4 Sing Out Glory  – Bernie Brown
14 11 6 See Me, Feel Me  – Who
15 20 3 Cry Blue bird Cry  – Rising Sons
16 14 12 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
17 9 12 Woodstock  – Matthews Southern Comfort
18 10 9 You Can Get it if You Really Want  – Desmond Dekker
19 13 5 The Witch  – Rattles
20 New 1 There’s a Light, There’s a Way  – Invaders

The Dealians’ ‘Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow’ enjoyed its 3rd week at the top of the charts, seeing off Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ which sat at number 2 for 2 weeks after dropping from the top spot. The new threat to The Dealians’ supremacy came from Dave Edmunds’ ‘I Hear You Knockin’. The latter had recently spent 6 weeks at the top of the UK charts so the pressure on The Dealians was great.

Dawn’s ‘Knock Three Times’ took the biggest climber award moving up 10 places from 18 to 8. This was the 35th time a song had climbed 10 or more places in a week and the 15th time an American act had done this. The Americans were now level with the Brits for 10 or more place climbs with the other 5 of the 35 coming from 3 local hits and 1 each from French and Australian acts.

Badfinger’s ‘No Matter What’ climbed 9 places to be 1 of 4 other star raters this week. It was the 5th song so far to climb 9 and not be the biggest climber in the week with 2 further songs managing a 10 place climb and not being the biggest climber. The other star raters this week were The Rising Sons’ ‘Cry Bluebird Cry’ which moved up 5 to 15, Tidal Wave’s ‘Mango Mango’ (up 4 to 12) and Bernie Brown’s ‘Sing Out Glory’ (up 4 to 13). This was the 3rd time we had seen 3 or more local star raters in a week with one of the previous times also being 3 and one seeing 4 star raters.

On the falling front it was Matthew’s Southern Comfort’s ‘Woodstock’ and Desmond Dekker’s ‘You Can Get It If You Really Want’ which took the honours, both songs dropping 8 places to land at 17 and 18 respectively. This was Dekker’s 1st time with the award and the 5th time a Jamaican act had had a biggest faller.

Neil Diamond’s ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ continued on as the oldest on the charts, clocking up its 15th week with us.

There was only 1 song that left the charts this week and it was Black Sabbath’s ‘Paranoid. It had enjoyed a run of 11 weeks and peaked at number 3 during that time, outpeaking (if such a word exists) its achievement in the UK where it got to 4 and the US where it got to 61. This would be the only song by the Sabs that would chart in SA. Of the 295 weeks so far, there had been 56 occasions where we only had 1 song leave the chart which was just over 19% of the time. The most common number of songs to leave the chart was 3 which we had seen 107 times or 36.4% of the time.

The Invaders returned to the chart with their 3rd hit to date, ‘There’s A Light, There’s A Way’. It had been 93 weeks since we last saw the band in the top 20 and this was the 4th biggest gap between hits to date for a local act and the 21st biggest gap to date overall. ‘There’s A Light, There’s A Way’ was written by Joe Moses and John Burke, both member of the band. The Invaders had been the second act to chart with an instrumental and a vocal track as they had seen the instrumental ‘Shock Wave’ chart, followed by the vocal track ‘Chapel Of Dreams’. The first act to manage hits in both forms was Herb Alpert who did it with ‘Casino Royale’ (instrumental) and ‘This Guy’s In Love With You’ (vocal). In total 5 acts would manage to chart with both forms.

This new entry brought the local hit count up to 6, a total we had seen 4 times in the previous 20 weeks and which was just 1 below our record to date of 7.

Chris Andrews celebrated his 80th week in the charts which moved him into tied 11th place on the weeks count list, sharing the place with Tommy Roe. He was now just 1 place below his peak to date of 10 on that list, a peak he had last seen 238 weeks previously.

On the local list Tidal Wave pulled 1 week clear of The Outlet, their 21 weeks to date giving them position 16 on the list to themselves while The Outlet dropped to 17.

The average weeks the songs in this week’s top 20 had been with us moved above the 7 mark again after dropping below it last week. The average now stood at 7.1, the highest it had been in 47 weeks.

Youtube playlist:

22 January 1971

dealians_look_out

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
2 2 12 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
3 6 6 I Hear You Knockin’  – Dave Edmunds
4 4 7 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
5 3 14 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
6 5 9 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
7 12 3 Gypsy Woman  – Brian Hyland
8 7 5 San Bernadino  – Christie
9 9 11 Woodstock  – Matthews Southern Comfort
10 8 8 You Can Get it if You Really Want  – Desmond Dekker
11 11 5 See Me, Feel Me  – Who
12 13 9 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews
13 17 4 The Witch  – Rattles
14 10 11 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
15 15 11 Paranoid  – Black Sabbath
16 18 4 Mango Mango  – Tidal Wave
17 19 3 Sing Out Glory  – Bernie Brown
18 New 1 Knock Three Times  – Dawn
19 New 1 No Matter What  – Badfinger
20 20 2 Cry Blue bird Cry  – Rising Sons

The Dealians’ ‘Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow’ held on to the number 1 spot, enjoying a second week there. Previous chart topper, Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ spent a second week at number 2 and became only the second song to spend 2 weeks at 2 either side of its time at 1. The previous song to manage this was the number 1 hit that ‘Looky Looky’ took over the top spot from, namely Neil Diamonds’ ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’.

Brian Hyland’s ‘Gypsy Woman’ moved up a further 5 places and was the biggest climber for a second week running. Unlike the previous week, it was not the only star rater in the charts as The Rattles’ ‘The Witch’ moved up 4 from 17 to 13.

  1. Dean Taylor saw his first biggest faller award as ‘Indiana Wants Me’ dropped 4 from 10 to 14 to take the honours this week. This was the 7th time we had seen the biggest faller be by a Canadian act and the 9th time if one includes the 2 times Steve Karliski’s duet with American Mimi Roman took the award.

Deep Purple’s ‘Black Night’ was the first of 2 songs to fall off the top 20. It spent 12 weeks on the charts and peaked at number 6. This was a much better performance than their only other hit to date, ‘Hush’, which only managed 4 weeks and a peak of 14. This was not the last we would see of the group on our chart.

Also going was the oldest song on last week’s chart, The Shuffles’ ‘Cha-La-La, I Need You’ which managed a run of 16 weeks and peaked at 2. It had been the oldest on the charts for 6 weeks alongside The Mike Curb Congregation’s ‘Burning Bridges’ and then for a further 2 weeks on its own. It would be the only hit we would see on our charts from this Dutch band. Their departure from the chart took us back down to 7 nations represented in the top 20 after having been at the record to date 8 for the previous 3 weeks. Neil Diamond’s ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ took over as the oldest on the charts. It had managed 14 weeks so far.

Dawn returned to the charts and this time Tony Orlando got a separate credit. Having sang on their previous hit, ‘Candida’, their second hit, ‘Knock Three Times’ was credited to Tony Orlando and Dawn.  Irwin Levine, who had co-written ‘Candida’ also had a hand in writing the new hit, but this time he was joined by Russell Brown (Toni Wine have co-credits with Levine on ‘Candida).  While ‘Candida’ had fared fairly well, ‘Knock Three Time’s was an even bigger hit, topping the charts in the UK (for 5 weeks), the US (for 2 weeks), Australia, Canada and New Zealand as well as going to 2 in Belgium and Germany, 3 in The Netherlands, Ireland and what was then Rhodesia, 4 in Switzerland and 6 in Austria. According to Wikipedia, the song apparently sold over 100,000 copies a day in New York for 10 straight days.

Badfinger made their SA Chart debut with ‘No Matter What’, a song penned by band member Pete Ham. The band’s UK record label did not at first regard the song as good enough for any form of release, but their American counterpart thought it could be a hit. It was subsequently released and went top 10 in both countries, peaking at 5 in the UK and 8 in the US. It was going to be used as part of the soundtrack to the film ‘Wayne’s World 2’ but failed to make the final cut due to an issue with obtaining the rights for using the song. In 2005 Def Leppard released a cover version of it but that failed to make an impact on the charts on either side of the Atlantic or in Europe.

The Rising Son’s ‘Cry Bluebird Cry’ became the 15th song to spend consecutive weeks at number 20 as it was unmoved at that spot. 8 of the previous 14 to do so ended up leaving the charts the following week. The Rising Sons were the 4th local act to manage this and the last song to manage this also started with the word ‘Cry’ and that was The Box Tops’ ‘Cry Like A Baby’.

Desmond Dekker and Tidal Wave both celebrated reaching the 20 weeks in the chart mark and while this placed them tied 68th overall (joining 7 other acts on this total), it did mean that Tidal Wave moved into tied 16th place on the local weeks count list, joining The Outlet there.

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15 January 1971

dealians_look_out

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 6 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
2 1 11 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
3 5 13 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
4 6 6 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
5 3 8 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
6 7 5 I Hear You Knockin’  – Dave Edmunds
7 9 4 San Bernadino  – Christie
8 4 7 You Can Get it if You Really Want  – Desmond Dekker
9 10 10 Woodstock  – Matthews Southern Comfort
10 8 10 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
11 12 4 See Me, Feel Me  – Who
12 16 2 Gypsy Woman  – Brian Hyland
13 15 8 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews
14 14 16 Cha-La-La, I Need You  – Shuffles
15 13 10 Paranoid  – Black Sabbath
16 11 12 Black Night  – Deep Purple
17 19 3 The Witch  – Rattles
18 17 3 Mango Mango  – Tidal Wave
19 20 2 Sing Out Glory  – Bernie Brown
20 New 1 Cry Blue bird Cry  – Rising Sons

The Dealians brought us our 15th local chart topper as ‘Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow’ ousted Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ from the he number 1 position. This was the second of 8 occasions where we would see a local act knock a song by an act not from The US, The UK or another local act from the top spot. The previous time we saw a local act knock someone from a ‘rest of the world’ nation from the top was when Dave Mills’s ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ took over the number 1 spot from Dutch act Shocking Blue’s ‘Venus’. The Dealians were the 16th act of those who would ultimately have 5 or more hits have their first go to number 1. They were only the second local act to do this, the first being Billy Forrest whose first hit, ‘Lazy Life’ was released under the name Quentin E. Klopjaeger.

Brian Hyland’s ‘Gypsy Woman’ took the biggest climber award as it moved up 4 from 16 to 12. This was the 42nd time the biggest climber had been 4 or less places meaning that there were no other star raters. 7 of those 42 times, the biggest climb was less than the star rater level of 4 places.

It was a black day for Deep Purple as their hit ‘Black Night’ took the biggest faller award, dropping 5 places from 11 to 16. This was the 3rd song with the word ‘black’ in the title to be biggest faller, the previous being The Rolling Stones ‘Paint It Black’      which was the biggest faller twice and Los Bravos ‘Black Is Black’ which managed it once. The only song so far with ‘black’ in the title to chart was The Horst Jankowski Orchestra’s ‘A Walk In The Black Forrest’. This managed its chart run without having a biggest faller to its name.

The Shuffles’ ‘Cha-La-La, I Need You’ continued as the oldest on the chart as it entered its 16th week with us. So far 38 songs had now managed 16 or more weeks in the chart.

We bid farewell to Melanie’s cover of The Rolling Stones’ ‘Ruby Tuesday’. It had been with us for 6 weeks and peaked at number 10. This would be the last Jagger/Richards composition that was not a Rolling Stones version that we would see chart and of the 3 that had charted, this was the best weeks and peak we had seen. The previous non-Rolling Stones versions of a Jagger/Richards composition to chart was Cliff Richard’s ‘Blue Turns To Grey’ (2 weeks peak of 19) and Chris Farlowe’s ‘Out Of Time’ (3 weeks peak of 16). Melanie would be seen again on our charts.

The Rising Sons’ ‘Cry Bluebird Cry’ was the new entry this week and it was their 2nd SA chart hit. It was written by Terry Dempsey giving him his 11th hit as a song writer. He now sat tied 6 on the number of hits by a song writer list, sharing the spot with Robin Gibb. ‘Cry Bluebird Cry’ had the distinction of being the 120th local song to grace the charts. So far 50 of these had been by solo male artists, 17 by solo female artists, 48 by groups and we had seen 5 duets (note: these figures exclude Virginia Lee’s duet with Slim Whitman).

Until this week Chris Andrews’ ‘Yo Yo’ had gone up the chart and then down. This week it started going back up again (from 15 to 13) and accordingly was behaving like its name. This moved his weeks tally on to 78 and he moved 1 ahead of Cliff Richard which meant he took 12th place on the weeks count list for himself while Cliff was relegated to 13th. Chris Andrews also celebrated moving past the 1,100 points mark. He sat 7th overall for points.

On the local weeks count list, Tidal Wave moved on to 19 weeks taking 17th place for themselves and causing The Square Set to drop to 18th.

For the first time in 44 weeks, we saw the average number of weeks that the songs in the top 20 had been with us, go over the 7 mark. It sat at 7.05. The record to date was 8.75.

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