23 May 1975

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 4 As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone  – Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty
2 2 11 Love Hurts  – Nazareth
3 3 7 Mandy  – Barry Manilow
4 8 3 I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do  – ABBA
5 10 5 Lady  – Styx
6 13 3 Jou Hart is Weer Myne  – Heintje
7 11 4 If  – Telly Savalas
8 4 10 Shame, Shame, Shame  – Shirley & Company
9 5 6 Private Number  – Lionel Petersen
10 9 9 I’ll Take You There  – Staple Singers
11 6 12 Ms Grace  – Tymes
12 16 3 Viva Espana (Forever A Song In My Heart)  – Boones
13 7 9 In the Summernight  – Teach In
14 12 6 You Can Have Her  – Sam Neely
15 17 2 Bye Bye Baby  – Bay City Rollers
16 14 7 Never Can Say Goodbye  – Gloria Gaynor
17 New 1 There’s a Whole Lot of Loving  – Guys & Dolls
18 New 1 Sing a Song of Love  – George Baker Selection
19 19 5 Down Down  – Status Quo
20 18 4 Storybook Children  – Sammy Brown

‘As Soon As I Hang Up The Phone’ by Loretta Lynn and Conway Twitty enjoyed a second week at number 1. This put the Americans level with the Brits for weeks at 1 as both nations had now seen 194 weeks with a chart topper.  The previous chart topper, Nazareth’s ‘Love Hurt’s was unmoved at 2 while Barry Manilow’s ‘Mandy’ spent a 3rd consecutive week at number 3.

Heintje’s ‘Jou Hart Is Weer Myne’ was the climber of the week for a second week running. It gained a further 7 places as it moved from 13 to 6. This meant that off all the 7 acts from the Netherlands that had managed to see a biggest climber so far, only 2 had failed to manage more than 1 and they were The Shuffles and Teach In. Teach In’s chances of picking up a second biggest climber were looking slim as they picked up the faller of the week award with ‘In The Summernight’ falling 6 from 7 to 13. This meant that we had the 4th occasion where the climber and faller were from the same non big 3 nation. The previous 3 occasions had all been when we had a Canadian act as climber and faller in the same week.

There were 4 other star raters this week, Styx’s ‘Lady’ once again missed out on a biggest climber award as it made another 5 place jump to follow up on last week’s 5 place jump. It moved up from 10 to 5. Abba’s ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’ was also a star rater for a second week running, but only managed a 4 place climb from 8 to 4 compared to the 5 place climb it managed last week. The final 2 star raters were Telly Savalas’ ‘If’ which moved up 4 from 11 to 7 and The Boones’ ‘Viva Espana (Forever A Song In My Heart)’which moved up 4 from 16 to 12.

For the 3rd week running, the oldest song on the charts was one of those to leave the top 20 as The Carpenters’ ‘Please Mr Postman’ ended its run after 15 weeks and 2 weeks at 1. This also brought to an end The Carpenters’ time in our charts. They had managed 2 hits (the other being ‘Hurting Each Other’) spent a total of 20 weeks in the charts with the 2 weeks at 1 by ‘Please Mr Postman’ being their best effort. ‘Please Mr Postman’ had managed a total of 16 weeks between the 2 versions that had charted with The Pat Boone Family’s version adding 1 to the song’s total. It sat tied 23rd for weeks by a song charting in more than 1 version. It shared the spot with ‘Elusive Butterfly’ (Judy Page and Bob Lind) and ‘This Is My Song’ (Harry Secombe and Petula Clark).

With ‘Please Mr Postman’ having gone we had to look to The Tymes’ ‘Ms Grace’ as the oldest. It was on 12 weeks. The last time we had seen a oldest song with just 12 weeks to its name was when ‘Band On The Run’ by Wings became the oldest in October 1974.

Also leaving the top 20 was Billy Swan’s ‘I Can Help’ which spent 14 weeks on the charts and peaked at 3. There would be more to come from him.

The first new entry this week was by The George Baker Selection. ‘Sing A Song Of Love’ was their 4th song to chart in SA and the 13th by a Dutch act. The George Baker Selection led the way in terms of number of hits by a Dutch act with After All and Heintje next, both on 2 hits. This was the first time we had seen 3 songs by Ducth acts in the charts in the same week with Heintje’s ‘Jou Hart Is Weer Myne’ and Teach In’s ‘In The Summernight’ being the other two. We would see this happen a few more times, but we would never see as many as 4. The Netherlands moved ahead of Australia for number of hits on the charts and they now had 6th place to themselves on that list as Australia dropped to 7th. ‘Sing A Song Of Love’ knocked Carl Douglas’ ‘Kung Fu Fighting’ off the top of the Dutch charts to be the number 1 there for 3 weeks from 1 November 1974. It also spent a week at the top of the Belgian charts.

Our other new entry this week was Guys And Dolls’ ‘There’s A Whole Lot Of Loving’. Guys & Dolls were a British group whose members included David van Day and Thereza Bazar – who went on to form the group Dollar which had a couple of hits in the UK in the early 80s – and Julie Forsythe, the daughter of British TV presenter, Bruce Forsythe. ‘There’s A Whole Lot Of Loving’ made it to number 2 in the UK and was the first (and highest charting) of 5 hits they would go on to have. The song also made number 7 in Holland, 5 in Zimbabwe and 19 in Belgium.

Lionel Petersen saw his weeks count reach the 30 mark and was the 26th local act (97th overall) to manage this. Status Quo reached the 20 weeks mark and was the 160th act to do so.

Both of the leavers this week had been a chart toppers in US so the number of hits in the top 20 that had topped the charts in the US, UK or both countries dropped down from 1 off the record 8 to 3 off the record 6.

For the last 3 weeks we had had 3 songs on the charts where the title was made up of the same word or phrase repeated as we had Abba’s ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’, Shirley & Company’s ‘Shame, Shame, Shame’ and Status Quo’s ‘Down Down’. The Bay City Rollers’ ‘Bye Bye Baby’ had a repeated word, but the whole title was not repetition.

Youtube playlist:

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16 May 1975

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 3 As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone  – Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty
2 1 10 Love Hurts  – Nazareth
3 3 6 Mandy  – Barry Manilow
4 4 9 Shame, Shame, Shame  – Shirley & Company
5 6 5 Private Number  – Lionel Petersen
6 5 11 Ms Grace  – Tymes
7 8 8 In the Summernight  – Teach In
8 13 2 I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do  – ABBA
9 7 8 I’ll Take You There  – Staple Singers
10 15 4 Lady  – Styx
11 14 3 If  – Telly Savalas
12 9 5 You Can Have Her  – Sam Neely
13 19 2 Jou Hart is Weer Myne  – Heintje
14 11 6 Never Can Say Goodbye  – Gloria Gaynor
15 10 14 I Can Help  – Billy Swan
16 20 2 Viva Espana (Forever A Song In My Heart)  – Boones
17 New 1 Bye Bye Baby  – Bay City Rollers
18 16 3 Storybook Children  – Sammy Brown
19 18 4 Down Down  – Status Quo
20 12 15 Please Mr. Postman  – Carpenters

Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘As Soon As I Hang up The Phone’ became the 14th song to reach the top spot in just 3 weeks. This was the second fastest as we had also seen 3 songs get there in their second week. The duet ousted Nazareth’s ‘Love Hurts’ from number 1 after the later had spent 5 weeks there. ‘Love Hurts’ dropped to number 2.

Heintje’s new one, ‘Jou Hart Is Weer Myne’ was at 19 last week and if it had dropped off the charts it would have equalled his previous hit, ‘Leise Rieselt Der Schnee’, but instead of dropping off, it decided to be the climber of the week, moving up 6 from 19 to 13. This was the 11th time that we had seen our biggest climber be by an act from The Netherlands although he was only the 6th act from there to have a biggest climber with just 2 of the previous ones only having 1 biggest climber to their name.

Two songs managed 5 place climbs and they were Abba’s ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’ which moved from 13 to 8 and Styx’s ‘Lady’ which climbed up from 15 to 10. The only other star rater this week was The Boones’ ‘Viva Espana (Forever A Song In My Heart)’ which climbed 4 from 20 to 16.

The faller of the week was The Carpenters’ version of ‘Please Mr Postman’ which dropped 8 from 12 to 20. This was the 10th time we had seen a previous chart topper drop 8 places in a week. We had seen 1 occasion when a chart topper dropped 9 places as well as 2 times when one had dropped 10 places, although the record to date for a fall by an ex-chart topper was 11 places which 2 songs had managed.

‘Please Mr Postman’ could, however, take comfort from the fact that it was the oldest in the charts, sitting on 15 weeks. The oldest on last week’s chart, Bobby Angel’s ‘You Ask Me To’ was the only song to leave the top 20 this week. It had lasted 17 weeks and spent 2 of those weeks at number 1. There was still a number of hits to come from Bobby.

In Bobby Angel’s place we saw the first song by The Bay City Rollers to make it onto our charts in the form of ‘Bye Bye Baby’. They had already had 5 songs make the UK charts (all of them going top 10) before ‘Bye Bye Baby’ made it there. It would be their first of 2 UK chart toppers. The song was a cover of a Four Seasons hit from 1965. The latter version made it to number 12 in the US, while the Bay City Roller’s version would oust Telly Savalas’ ‘If’ (sitting at number 11 on our charts this week) from the top spot in the UK. For songwriter Bob Crewe, this was his 4th hit as he had had a hand in writing the Four Season’s ‘Let’s Hang On’, The Tremeloes’ ‘Silence Is Golden’ and Drummond’s 1972 hit ‘Daddy Cool’. Bob Gaudio who shared song writing credits with Crewe on ‘Bye Bye Baby’ was a member of the Four Seasons and this would be his second SA hit as songwriter. He had co-written The Tremeloes’ ‘Silence Is Golden’ with Crewe.

The Carpenters celebrated reaching the 20 weeks in the chart milestone as ‘Please Mr Postman’ had now added 15 weeks to the 5 that ‘Hurting Each Other’, their only other hit to date, had managed.

The arrival of The Bay City Rollers’ ‘Bye Bye Baby’ on the charts meant that we now had 8 songs in the top 20 that had topped the charts in UK, the US or in both countries. This was just 1 off the record to date 9 that we had seen on 6 previous occasions.

Youtube playlist:

9 May 1975

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 9 Love Hurts  – Nazareth
2 12 2 As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone  – Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty
3 7 5 Mandy  – Barry Manilow
4 3 8 Shame, Shame, Shame  – Shirley & Company
5 2 10 Ms Grace  – Tymes
6 6 4 Private Number  – Lionel Petersen
7 9 7 I’ll Take You There  – Staple Singers
8 5 7 In the Summernight  – Teach In
9 11 4 You Can Have Her  – Sam Neely
10 4 13 I Can Help  – Billy Swan
11 8 5 Never Can Say Goodbye  – Gloria Gaynor
12 10 14 Please Mr. Postman  – Carpenters
13 New 1 I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do  – ABBA
14 20 2 If  – Telly Savalas
15 13 3 Lady  – Styx
16 17 2 Storybook Children  – Sammy Brown
17 14 17 You Ask Me To  – Bobby Angel
18 19 3 Down Down  – Status Quo
19 New 1 Jou Hart is Weer Myne  – Heintje
20 New 1 Viva Espana (Forever A Song In My Heart)  – Boones

‘Love Hurts’ by Nazareth became the 33rd song to spend at least 5 weeks at the top of the charts as it held off the challenge from The Tymes’ ‘Ms Grace’. The latter dropped from 2 to 5 after it had spent 2 weeks at 2. The new challenger jumped to number 2 with a huge 10 place leap. Taking the climber of the week award, ‘As Soon As I Hang Up The Phone’ by Loretta Lynn and Conway Twitty gave us tha 57th time a song had jumped 10 or more places in a week.

There were 2 other star raters this week with Barry Manilow’s ‘Mandy’ moving up 4 from 7 to 3 and Telly Savalas’ ‘If’ climbing 6 from 20 to 14.

Falling honours went to Billy Swan’s ‘I Can Help’ which dropped 6 from 4 to 10.

For a second week running we had 3 songs leave the charts and, obviously, 3 new entries. The first to go was Neil Herbert’s ‘She’s A Woman’ which lasted 22 weeks and spent 1 of those at 1. This would be his only SA chart hit. It had been the oldest on the charts for the past 10 weeks. The new oldest song was Bobby Angel’s ‘You Ask Me To’ which was sitting on 17 weeks.

Also going was The Stylistics’ ‘You Make Me Feel Brand New’ which lasted 13 weeks and peaked at 6. This would be their only SA chart hit.

Last to go was Bachman-Turner Overdrive’s ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’ which had spent 20 weeks on the charts and had taken over the number 1 spot from fellow leaver, ‘She’ A Woman’, and gone on to spend 5 weeks at the top of our charts. Bachman-Turner Overdrive would see another hit chart.

The first of our new entries had the highest debut position for an Abba hit to date. ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’ came crashing in at 13. Of their 3 previous hits, 2 had entered the charts at 16 (‘Ring, Ring’ and ‘Hasta Manana’) while their other hit, ‘Waterloo’ only started its top 20 life at 19. ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’ managed to get to number 38 in the UK and would have to wait until 1976 to get to 15 in the US. Elsewhere it topped the Australian, New Zealand and Swiss Charts and went top 10 in Austria, Belgium, Holland, France, Germany, Norway and Zimbabwe. The song features the saxophone sound of 1950s orchestra leader Billy Vaughn who had had 28 Hot 100 hits in the US, including a number 2 hit with ‘Melody Of Love’ in 1955. ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’ was the 5th song by a Swedish act to chart and this put Sweden tied 11th on the list of hits from a nation.

Our second new entry set a new record to date for the biggest gap between hits by an act from the non big 3 nations. We had last seen Heintje on the charts on 28 February 1969, 6 years, 2 months and 11 days ago. This 323 week gap was the 4th biggest overall. ‘Jou Hart Is Weer Myne’ was the 12th song by a Dutch act to chart and this put Holland in tied 6th place with Australia for hits from a nation. Heintje’s full name was Heintje Simons. ‘Jou Hart Is Weer Myne’ was his second hit and was actually an Afrikaans one, making it the 20th Afrikaans hit to make the charts.

Our final new entry was a cover of the song ‘Viva Espana’ (sometimes called ‘Y Viva Espana’). The version that made our top 20 was by The Boones, but the one that seemed to have most success globally was by Sylvia (surname Vrethammar) who took it to number 4 in the UK. The song was credited to The Boones who were Pat Boones’ daughters Cherry, Lindy, Laury and Debby, however, listening to it, there is a male vocalist who, one assumes was Pat and it should really have been credited to The Pat Boone Family in the same way their earlier hit ‘Please Mr Postman’ had. Their version of ‘Viva Espana’ was produced by Mike Curb who (with his Congregation) had had a hit in SA in 1970 with ‘Burning Bridges’.

Youtube playlist:

2 May 1975

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Love Hurts  – Nazareth
2 2 9 Ms Grace  – Tymes
3 4 7 Shame, Shame, Shame  – Shirley & Company
4 3 12 I Can Help  – Billy Swan
5 8 6 In the Summernight  – Teach In
6 14 3 Private Number  – Lionel Petersen
7 15 4 Mandy  – Barry Manilow
8 9 4 Never Can Say Goodbye  – Gloria Gaynor
9 11 6 I’ll Take You There  – Staple Singers
10 5 13 Please Mr. Postman  – Carpenters
11 17 3 You Can Have Her  – Sam Neely
12 New 1 As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone  – Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty
13 19 2 Lady  – Styx
14 6 16 You Ask Me To  – Bobby Angel
15 7 20 You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet  – Bachman-Turner Overdrive
16 13 13 You Make Me Feel Brand New  – Stylistics
17 New 1 Storybook Children  – Sammy Brown
18 12 22 She’s a Woman  – Neil Herbert
19 20 2 Down Down  – Status Quo
20 New 1 If  – Telly Savalas

It was now 4 weeks in a row at 1 for Nazareth’s ‘Love Hurts’ and this took the Brits back into the outright lead for total weeks at 1. They had 193 weeks at 1 to their name and they pulled 1 ahead of the Americans who were on 192. An American act, The Tymes, were unmoved at 2 with ‘Ms Grace’.

Lionel Petersen’s ‘Private Number’ was once again the biggest climber. It followed up last week’s 5 place climb with an 8 place leap from 14 to 6 to give Petersen his 4th time with the biggest climber, making him the 8th of 16 local acts who would see this many climbers. It shared the climbing honours with Barry Manilow’s ‘Mandy’ which moved up 8 from 15 to 7.

There were 2 other star raters this week, Sam Neely’s ‘You Can Have Her’ which climbed 6 from 17 to 11 and Styx’s ‘Lady’ which also climbed 6, moving up from 19 to 13.

Two of the songs starting with ‘You’ shared the honours for faller of the week with Bachman-Turner Overdrive’s ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’ dropping 8 from 7 to 15 and Bobby Angel’s ‘You Ask Me To’ falling its 8 places from 6 to 14. This was the 8th time that the climber and faller had moved the same number of places and that number had been 8 or greater. Of those 8 occasions, we had seen once when the climber had faller had been 9 places and once when it had been 10 places.

‘She’s A Woman’ by Neil Herbert moved on to 22 weeks in the charts and became the 8th song to spend at least 10 weeks as the oldest on the charts. It was the 4th local song to manage this.

It had been 10 weeks since we had seen at least 3 songs leave the charts (4 left the top 20 10 weeks previously). The first of this week’s leavers was Splinter’s ‘Costafine Town’ which lasted 10 weeks with us, peaking at 9 during that time. This would be the band’s only SA chart hit.

Pilot’s ‘Magic’ managed 6 weeks, peaked at 11. Like Splinter, Pilot would only have 1 SA chart hit.

Last to go was Barry White’s ‘You’re the First, the Last, My Everything’ which lasted 13 weeks and peaked at 2 and as with his fellow leavers, this spelt the end of White’s SA chart career, but unlike the others, he had seen 2 songs chart. He managed a total of 25 weeks with us and the peak of 2 for ‘You’re the First, the Last, My Everything’ was his best effort. ‘You’re the First, the Last, My Everything´ fell off the charts from position 10, the 34th song to drop out of the top 20 from 10th place or higher. The last time we had seen this was in December 1973 when the George Baker Selection’s ‘Baby Blue’ fell off the charts from number 10. There had been 13 songs that had dropped off the charts from a higher position.

The first new entry this week was the 31st song by a duet/collaboration to chart. Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty teamed up to bring us ‘As Soon As I Hang Up The Phone’. It topped the Country Singles charts in both the US and Canada in August 1974. In the US it knocked Billy “Crash” Craddock’s ‘Rub It In’, a previous top 20 hit in SA, off the top spot on the Country Charts there. Twitty penned the song. It had been 31 weeks since we last saw a collaborative hit on the charts.

Sammy Brown brought the local count up to 4 as his song ‘Storybook Children’ entered the charts at 17. It had been 26 weeks since the local content was this high. All 4 local acts on the charts this week were solo male artists. ‘Storybook Children’ was a cover of a 1968 hit for Billy Vera & Judy Clay who took the song to number 20 on the US R&B Charts. It was written by Chip Taylor. At the time Brown’s version was in the SA charts, he was busy preparing to star in Des & Dawn’s production of the musical ‘Pippin’.

Our final new entry had the shortest title of any song to chart so far. At only 2 characters long ‘If’ by Telly Savalas entered the charts at 20. We would only see 1 more song that was only 2 characters long. Savalas was well known as the lollipop sucking cop Kojak and ‘If’ was a cover of a 1971 hit for the group Bread. Bread’s version made it to number 4 on the US Hot 100, but Savalas failed to get his version into charts there. However, in the UK he topped the charts for 2 weeks where Bread’s version had failed to chart. Savalas became the 4th oldest person to chart so far. He was 54 years, 8 months 19 days. Louis Armstrong, Perry Como, Frankie Laine were the 3 who had been older. ‘If’ was the 400th song by an American act to chart.

Bachman-Turner Overdrive’s ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’ was the 39th song to reach the 20 weeks in the chart mark. It was the 1st song by a Canadian act to manage this and the 6th by a non big 3 nation act with there having been 2 by German acts (Peter Maffay and Freddy Breck), 2 by Greek acts (both by Vicky Leandros) and 1 by a New Zealand act (Double Vision). ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’ also became the 27th song to reach the 300 points mark.

The gap between the number of hits by US acts and those by British acts was now 13 with the former on 400 (as mentioned above) and the latter on 387. This was the biggest gap we had seen for 181 weeks which just happened to be when the Americans were on 300 and the Brits on 287, both 100 less than they were this week. The Americans also celebrated passing the 3,600 weeks mark.

Youtube playlist

24 April 1975

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 Love Hurts  – Nazareth
2 4 8 Ms Grace  – Tymes
3 3 11 I Can Help  – Billy Swan
4 5 6 Shame, Shame, Shame  – Shirley & Company
5 2 12 Please Mr. Postman  – Carpenters
6 6 15 You Ask Me To  – Bobby Angel
7 7 19 You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet  – Bachman-Turner Overdrive
8 12 5 In the Summernight  – Teach In
9 14 3 Never Can Say Goodbye  – Gloria Gaynor
10 8 13 You’re the First, the Last, My Everything  – Barry White
11 13 5 I’ll Take You There  – Staple Singers
12 10 21 She’s a Woman  – Neil Herbert
13 9 12 You Make Me Feel Brand New  – Stylistics
14 19 2 Private Number  – Lionel Petersen
15 15 3 Mandy  – Barry Manilow
16 11 6 Magic  – Pilot
17 20 2 You Can Have Her  – Sam Neely
18 18 10 Costafine Town  – Splinter
19 New 1 Lady  – Styx
20 New 1 Down Down  – Status Quo

‘Love Hurts’ by Nazareth enjoyed a 3rd week at number 1 but after having had the previous 2 weeks with the former number 1, The Carpenters’ ‘Please Mr Postman’, sitting at 2, there was a new challenger in the form of The Tymes’ ‘Ms Grace’ which moved up 2 from 4 to 2. ‘Love Hurts’ clocked up the 192nd week at 1 by a British act. For the past 14 weeks, the Brits had been sitting behind the Americans for number of weeks at 1, but they now drew level. The Brits still led the way for number of chart toppers having 68 compared to the 61 of the Americans.

For the 4th week in a row, the biggest climb was 5 places and this was a new record sequence. It was Gloria Gaynor’s ‘Never Can Say Goodbye’ which took the award for a second week running as it moved up from 14 to 9. Gloria shared the honours with Lionel Petersen’s ‘Private Number’ which moved up from 19 to 14. It was Petersen’s 3rd time with the honours.

Teach In’s ‘In The Summernight’ was the only other star rater this week. It moved up 4 from 12 to 8. It was the song’s second time having a star rater climb as it managed this 2 weeks previously.

Pilot were the faller of the week (would hate to be on that flight) as their hit ‘Magic’ dropped 5 from 11 to 16.

Neil Herbert’s ‘She’s A Woman’ was still the oldest on the charts as it ticked over to 21 weeks and enjoyed its 9th week as the oldest.

Sweet Sensation’s ‘Sad Sweet Dreamer’ was the first of 2 songs to depart the chart. It lasted 10 weeks in the charts and peaked at 8. This would be their only SA chart hit although they did manage 1 other chart hit in the UK in the form of ‘Purely By Coincidence’ which peaked at 11 there on 2 February 1975.

Leo Sayer’s ‘Long Tall Glasses’ managed                 8 weeks and peaked 9. Of his 3 hits to date, this was the best he had managed. There was still plenty to come from him.

Our first new entry was ‘Lady’ which was the first song to chart in SA for Styx. The song was actually recorded in late 1972 and first released in 1973, but did nothing until an American DJ who loved it, decided to play it every evening at 8pm until it eventually became a hit, climbing to number 6 on the Hot 100. It also made it to number 17 in New Zealand. In 1995, the band re-recorded the song for inclusion on its Greatest Hits compilation for A&M records as A&M couldn’t get permission from Wooden Nickel Records (the label on which it had originally been released) to use it.

Status Quo’s ‘Down Down’ arrived in the charts 239 weeks after their previous hit, ‘Down The Dustpipe’ departed and this was the 12th biggest gap between hits that we had seen to date and the 3rd biggest gap for a song by a British act. So far we had seen 16 occasions where an acts had seen a gap of 200 weeks or more between hits. ‘Down Down’ made number 1 in the UK for 1 week and has so far been their only chart topper there despite them having had 67 hits. It also managed to top the charts in Holland and Belgium and got to number 2 in Switzerland.

‘She’s A Woman’ by Neil Herbert became the 26th song to ease past the 300 points mark as it ticked over to 301. It was the 9th song by a local act to manage this.

‘Please Mr Postman’ moved into tied 27th place for weeks in the chart by a song charting in more than 1 version. It had clocked up 12 weeks with the Carpenters’ version and 1 by the Pat Boone Family. It shared 27th place with ‘I’ll Step Aside’ (Tony Wells and Ronnie Wilson) and ‘Green Tambourine (Sun Dragon and Lemon Pipers) with both of these other 2 having 1 song spend 7 weeks in the chart and the other version 6.

Youtube playlist:

18 April 1975

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Love Hurts  – Nazareth
2 2 11 Please Mr. Postman  – Carpenters
3 3 10 I Can Help  – Billy Swan
4 4 7 Ms Grace  – Tymes
5 8 5 Shame, Shame, Shame  – Shirley & Company
6 6 14 You Ask Me To  – Bobby Angel
7 5 18 You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet  – Bachman-Turner Overdrive
8 7 12 You’re the First, the Last, My Everything  – Barry White
9 9 11 You Make Me Feel Brand New  – Stylistics
10 10 20 She’s a Woman  – Neil Herbert
11 13 5 Magic  – Pilot
12 12 4 In the Summernight  – Teach In
13 16 4 I’ll Take You There  – Staple Singers
14 19 2 Never Can Say Goodbye  – Gloria Gaynor
15 17 2 Mandy  – Barry Manilow
16 14 8 Long Tall Glasses  – Leo Sayer
17 15 10 Sad Sweet Dreamer  – Sweet Sensation
18 11 9 Costafine Town  – Splinter
19 New 1 Private Number  – Lionel Petersen
20 New 1 You Can Have Her  – Sam Neely

‘Love Hurts’ held on to the top spot to make it 2 weeks at the top while the previous incumbent on the number 1 place, The Carpenters’ ‘Please Mr Postman’, spent a second week at 2. Positions 3 and 4 (Billy Swan’s ‘I Can Help’ and The Tymes ‘Ms Grace’) were also unmoved.

Last week’s new entry, Gloria Gaynor’s ‘Never Can Say Goodbye’ was the climber of the week as it moved up 5 from 19 to 14. This was the 75th time a solo female artist had been the biggest climber. We had also seen 8 other occasions where a woman as one half of a duet had been the biggest climber. ‘Never Can Say Goodbye’ was the only star rater this week.

Splinter’s ‘Costafine Town’ dropped 7 from 11 to 18 to take the faller of the week award. It had been 19 weeks since we had last seen a fall of at least this magnitude.

After All’s ‘Help Me My Love’ was the first of 2 songs to drop off the top 20. It just missed out on the magical 20 weeks in the chart as it managed 19 with a peak of 4. It outdid their only other hit, ‘If You Need Me’ for weeks as the latter only managed 14, but their previous hit had topped the charts. This ended their SA chart run with 2 hits, 33 weeks and 3 weeks at 1. At this stage they had the 8th highest weeks count for an act from the non big 3 nations (UK, US & SA), and were the second highest Dutch act, sitting 4 weeks behind the George Baker Selection who were on 37.

John Denver’s ‘Back Home Again’ was the other song to go. It spent 12 weeks on the charts and peaked at 10 which was 1 place higher than his only other hit to date (‘Annie’s Song’) and 5 weeks more. Denver would make it back in to the charts again.

The departure of After All’s hit from the chart meant that Neil Herbert’s ‘She’s A Woman’ was the oldest in the charts on its own. It had shared that title with ‘Help Me My Love’ for 3 weeks and the 5 weeks before that Neil Diamond’s ‘Longfellow Serenade’ had accompanied the other 2.  ‘She’s A Woman’ was the 38th song to make 20 weeks in the charts and the 12th local one to do so. There would only be 7 more local hits that would manage this.

The first of the new entries was local lad Lionel Petersen with his 4th hit, ‘Private Number’. This was the first of his hits not to be produced by Mutt Lange, but the man who did produce it was no stranger to our charts – Peter Vee who had had 4 solo top 20 hits already. The female vocals on this recording were by Sofia Foster. ‘Private Number’ was penned by Booker T Jones (of Booker T & The MGs fame) and recorded in 1968 by William Bell & Judy Clay, however, other than this success by Lionel Petersen in SA, the song didn’t really have an impact on the world’s music charts till 1999 when UK boy band 911 took a version to number 3 in the UK.

The second new entry was Sam Neely’s ‘You Can Have Her’. Neely was an American country singer and he had a minor US hit with this song, taking it to number 34 in the main Hot 100 charts there and only peaking at 49 on the Country Singles charts (don’t ask me how that works). Neely died suddenly in 2006 at the age of 58.

Both Leo Sayer and Neil Herbert celebrated reaching the 20 weeks in the chart milestone but while Herbert had only needed 1 song to reach this total, Sayer was already on his 3rd hit. 157 acts had reached this milestone so far.

3 weeks previously we had seen 4 songs starting with ‘Y’ sitting next to each other on the charts. This week those same 4, ‘You Ask Me To’, ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’, ‘You’re the First, the Last, My Everything’ and ‘You Make Fe Feel Brand New’ were at positions 6 to 9 giving us the 3rd time we had seen 4 songs starting with the same letter sitting together. And with ‘You Can Have Her’ sitting at 20, this was the first time we had seen 5 songs starting with the same first 3 letters (‘You’) in the charts after 22 times with 4 songs being the most.

Youtube playlist:

11 April 1975

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 5 Love Hurts  – Nazareth
2 1 10 Please Mr. Postman  – Carpenters
3 3 9 I Can Help  – Billy Swan
4 6 6 Ms Grace  – Tymes
5 4 17 You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet  – Bachman-Turner Overdrive
6 5 13 You Ask Me To  – Bobby Angel
7 8 11 You’re the First, the Last, My Everything  – Barry White
8 11 4 Shame, Shame, Shame  – Shirley & Company
9 7 10 You Make Me Feel Brand New  – Stylistics
10 9 19 She’s a Woman  – Neil Herbert
11 10 8 Costafine Town  – Splinter
12 17 3 In the Summernight  – Teach In
13 14 4 Magic  – Pilot
14 13 7 Long Tall Glasses  – Leo Sayer
15 12 9 Sad Sweet Dreamer  – Sweet Sensation
16 15 3 I’ll Take You There  – Staple Singers
17 New 1 Mandy  – Barry Manilow
18 18 12 Back Home Again  – John Denver
19 New 1 Never Can Say Goodbye  – Gloria Gaynor
20 19 19 Help Me My Love  – After All

Nazareth’s ‘Love Hurts’ became the 68th song by a UK act to top the chart and in doing so clocked up the 190th week that we had seen a British act at number 1. ‘Love Hurts’ took over from ‘Please Mr Postman’ which fell to number 2 after enjoying 2 weeks at the top of the charts.

The climber of the week award went to Teach In’s ‘In The Summernight’ which moved up 5 from 17 to 12. This was the 10th time an act from The Netherlands had taken the award. ‘In The Summernight’ was the only song to have a star rater climb of 4 or more places this week.

Sweet Sensation’s ‘Sad Sweet Dreamer’ was the faller of the week. It dropped 3 from 12 to 15 to take the award.

Neither ‘Help Me My Love’ by After All’ nor ‘She’s A Woman’ by Neil Herbert fell out of the charts so they were still the oldest in the top 20 with both of them having picked up 19 weeks each.

This week saw the second of only 2 occasions where we would see 2 tracks by ex-Beatles leave the charts in the same week as Ringo Starr’s ‘Only You (And You Alone)’ and Paul McCartney’s ‘Junior’s Farm’ both left the charts this week. Ringo’s hit had lasted 7 weeks and peaked at 14, his first (of 4 hits so far) not to make the top 10 and not to manage at least 10 weeks. He would return to our charts at a much later date.

‘Junior’s Farm’ lasted 13 weeks and peaked at 6. This was his 3rd best peak of the 6 hits McCartney (either solo or as part of Wings) had had to date as well as the 3rd best weeks. As with Ringo, there was still more to come from him.

Barry Manilow had his first SA hit as ‘Mandy’ arrived at number 17. ‘Mandy’ began life as ‘Brandy’ and gave British songwriter Scott English a number 12 hit in the UK and a number 91 hit in the US in 1971. When Barry decided to cover it, they didn’t want it to be confused with Looking Glass’ ‘Brandy (You’re A Fine Girl)’ which was a hit in 1972, so changed the name of the girl who came and gave without taking from Brandy to Mandy. The song topped the Canadian charts and gave Manilow the first of 3 chart toppers in the US. In 2003 Westlife took ‘Mandy’ out for another date and they got to number 1 in the UK and Ireland.

Our second new entry this week was also a song from 1971. ‘Never Can Say Goodbye’ by The Jackson 5 made it to number 2 in the US. The version which made it onto our charts was Gloria Gaynor’s which had topped the US Disco Singles charts in 1974. In 1975 it went to number 9 on the main US charts and number 2 in the UK. As with Manilow’s ‘Mandy’, this was Gaynor’s first SA hit. This version of the song was produced by the Disco Corporation of America which was a production company set up by Meco Monardo (who would later have a hit with a disco version of the ‘Star Wars’ Theme) and Tony Bongiovi, cousin of Jon Bon Jovi. With Gloria in the chart, we once more had a solo female artist in the top 20. We had been without one for 6 weeks.

After 4 weeks of only having 8 in the top 20, the Americans were back to having 10 in the charts. This was the 87th time they had accounted for at least half the chart. The Brits had only managed this 62 times. The Americans were now 10 ahead of the Brits for overall hits count with the former on 396 and the latter of 386. This was the first time the gap between the 2 nations had been in double figures for 42 weeks. The Americans had been leading at that stage too.

We also had the 4th time where the song at the top of the charts and that at the bottom both contained the word ‘Love’ in the title. The previous 2 times had been on 10 September 1965 and 29 July 1966 so we had not seen this for 454 weeks.

Youtube playlist: