1 August 1969

time_is_tight_booker_t

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 6 Time is Tight  – Booker T & The MG’s
2 1 6 Little Yellow Aeroplane  – Leapy Lee
3 7 5 Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’  – Crazy Elephant
4 9 4 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
5 3 10 My Sentimental Friend  – Herman’s Hermits
6 5 9 Time of the Season  – Zombies
7 4 9 The Boxer  – Simon & Garfunkel
8 17 2 Bad Moon Rising  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
9 11 3 Love Theme from “Romeo & Juliet”  – Henry Mancini
10 8 7 Heather Honey  – Tommy Roe
11 12 3 Man of the World  – Fleetwood Mac
12 10 5 Montreal  – Judy Page Ft Kimbo
13 6 11 Proud Mary  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
14 18 2 Special Delivery  – 1910 Fruitgum Company
15 16 3 Turn Around  – Ken J. Larkin
16 19 2 Frozen Orange Juice  – Peter Sarstedt
17 13 8 Israelites  – Desmond Dekker
18 New 1 Big Ship  – Cliff Richard
19 New 1 Oh Happy Day  – Edwin Hawkins Singers
20 New 1 Lights of Cincinatti  – Scott Walker

‘Time Is Tight’ became the 4th instrumental song to top our charts as it ousted Leapy Lee’s ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ from the number 1 spot. The latter had spent just 1 week as our favourite song. It dropped to number 2 while Crazy Elephant’s ‘Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’ made a star rater 4 place climb to 3.

Our biggest climber was Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Bad Moon Rising’ which was rising 9 places in the charts from 17 to 8. Their other hit to date, ‘Proud Mary’ had never managed to get biggest climber and was 1 of 18 songs (15 if you exclude those on the very first charts) that topped the charts without ever being the biggest climber. What ‘Proud Mary’ did manage to do was be the biggest faller as it dropped 7 from 6 to 13. This was the 4th time we had seen an act have the biggest climber and biggest faller in the same week.

The Archies’ ‘Sugar, Sugar’ climbed 5 to number 4 to give the group their 4th star rater while Crazy Elephant’s ‘Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’ mentioned above and The 1910 Fruitgum Company’s ‘Special Delivery’ were the other star raters this week. The latter climbed 4 places to land at 14.

Dickie Loader’s ‘Young Love Can Hurt’ was the first of 3 songs to leave the charts this week. It had spent 10 weeks with us and peaked at 9. There were still a couple more hits to come from Loader. So far 24 of the 82 local songs to chart had managed 10 or more weeks which works out to just under 30%. We had a better success rate for reaching the top 10 as 34 of the 82 (41.5%) had managed this.

Sandie Shaw’s ‘Think It All Over’ also left the top 20. It had been with us for 7 weeks and peaked at 4. This brought to an end Shaw’s SA Chart career. We had seen 5 of her hits chart with us, she had spent a total of 54 weeks on the charts, 1 of which was with ‘Puppet On A String’ at number 1, her highest peaking song. She sat 17th on the weeks count list and her departure triggered the start of the 8th run with no woman artists gracing our charts.

The charts were looking a bit bald as ‘Hair’ fell out of them. This would bring to an end The Cowsills’ SA Chart career. They had seen 2 hits chart with us (the other being ‘Indian Lake’) and both had spent 12 weeks in the top 20, giving them a total weeks count of 24. ‘Hair’s 1 week at 1 was the pinnacle of their chart performance with ‘Indian Lake’ getting to number 4.

Cliff Richard’s ‘Big Ship’ was the first of the new songs to sail into the charts. The song would be Cliff’s 49th UK chart hit where it would peak at 8. This was the first time that 3 consecutive UK hits for Cliff would also make our charts as his previous 2 in the UK, ‘Good Times (Better Times)’ and ‘Don’t Forget To Catch Me’ were also his previous 2 hits in SA. ‘Big Ship’ was written by Raymond Froggatt who had also brought us ‘The Red Balloon’ which was a hit for The Dave Clark Five. These would be his only 2 successes as a song writer on our charts.

‘Oh Happy Day’ by The Edwin Hawkins Singers was the second new entry. The song was based on an 18th century hymn (‘Oh Happy Day, that fixed my choice’) which itself was based on Acts 8 verse 35 from the Bible. The original hymn was written by Phillip Doddridge and Edwin Hawkins has song writing credits on his updated version. George Harrison has been quoted as saying that the song was his main inspiration for his hit ‘My Sweet Lord’ which came out the following year. ‘Oh Happy Day’ won the 1970 Grammy for Best Soul Gospel Performance.

Scott Walker along with his 2 “brothers” made up The Walker Brothers (they were in fact 3 unrelated guys) who had a number of hits in the 60s, most notably ‘The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine Anymore’ and ‘Make It Easy On Yourself’ which were both chart toppers in the UK. Despite being American, both The Walker Brothers and Scott as a solo artist had more success in the UK as Scott has not made the US charts as a solo artist, but has had 3 UK hits including ‘Lights Of Cincinnati’ which was our 3rd new entry this week. The song made it to number 13 in the UK and 30 in Ireland. It was written by Tony Macaulay and Geoff Stephens. Macaulay now had 6 hits as song writer to his name and Stephens was on 9 which placed him tied 5th alongside Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Les Reed led the way on 14 followed by Barry Mason (13), Barry Gibb (11) and Robin Gibb (10).

The gap between number of hits by Americans and those by British artists was down to 1 with the former on 204 and the latter on 205.

The 1910 Fruitgum Company became the 30th act to reach the 30 weeks in the chart mark while Herman’s Hermits drew level with The Beach Boys on 88 weeks. They sat tied 4th on the weeks count list. Cliff Richard’s new one drew him level 13th with The Seekers. They were on 66 weeks. On the local weeks count list, Judy Page crept into the top 20, sitting tied 19th with The A-Cads and Group 66 on 14 weeks.

Youtube playlist:

25 July 1969

leapy-lee-little-yellow-aeroplane

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 4 5 Little Yellow Aeroplane  – Leapy Lee
2 6 5 Time is Tight  – Booker T & The MG’s
3 1 9 My Sentimental Friend  – Herman’s Hermits
4 3 8 The Boxer  – Simon & Garfunkel
5 2 8 Time of the Season  – Zombies
6 5 10 Proud Mary  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
7 8 4 Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’  – Crazy Elephant
8 7 6 Heather Honey  – Tommy Roe
9 11 3 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
10 15 4 Montreal  – Judy Page Ft Kimbo
11 19 2 Love Theme from “Romeo & Juliet”  – Henry Mancini
12 18 2 Man of the World  – Fleetwood Mac
13 12 7 Israelites  – Desmond Dekker
14 10 12 Hair  – Cowsills
15 9 7 Think it All Over  – Sandie Shaw
16 20 2 Turn Around  – Ken J. Larkin
17 New 1 Bad Moon Rising  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
18 New 1 Special Delivery  – 1910 Fruitgum Company
19 New 1 Frozen Orange Juice  – Peter Sarstedt
20 13 10 Young Love Can Hurt  – Dickie Loader

Leapy Lee was flying high in the charts this week as ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ took over the top spot from Herman’s Hermits’ ‘My Sentimental Friend’, the latter dropping to 3. ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ managed to do what Lee’s previous hit, ‘Little Arrows’ couldn’t as that previous hit stalled at 2.

Henry Mancini’s ‘Love Theme From “Romeo & Juliet”’ gave us the 12th time having an instrumental as the biggest climber. It moved up 8 places from 19 to 11. This was the 3rd highest jump we had seen by an instrumental with Whistling Jack Smith’s 10 place climb with ‘I Was Kaiser Bill’s Batman’ and the 12 place climb that The Paul Mauriat Orchestra’s ‘Love Is Blue’ having managed better.

The other instrumental on the chart, Booker T & The MG’s ‘Time Is Tight’ was 1 of 4 other star raters this week. It climbed 4 from 6 to 2 and it was the 3rd time the song had jumped 4 or more places in a week. Also making star rater status was Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Man Of The World’ which moved up 6 to 12, Judy Page’s ‘Montreal’ which climbed 5 to 10 and Ken J. Larkin’s ‘Turn Around’ which jumped 4 to 16.

Dickie Loader picked up his 2nd biggest faller as ‘Young Love Can Hurt’ dropped 7 from 13 to 20. His previous time with the biggest faller was when ‘Sea Of Heartbreak’ took the honours in the September of 1966.

The Cowsills’ ‘Hair’ extended its run as the oldest on the charts as it ticked over to 12 weeks and enjoyed its second week as the oldest.

The Sandpipers SA Chart career came to an end with the departure of ‘Kumbaya’ from the top 20. The song had lasted 7 weeks with us and peaked at 8. They had seen 2 hits make our charts, enjoyed a total of 21 weeks with us and seen ‘Guantanamera’ give them their best peak when it went to number 2.

Ray Stevens first outing onto our charts ended with the departure of ‘Gitarzan’ after 4 weeks and a peak of 16. The good news for him was that this would not be his last appearance on our top 20.

Last to go was Ohio Express’ ‘Mercy’ which had lasted 9 weeks on the charts and peaked at 6. As with The Sandpipers the departure of their song this week marked the end of Ohio Express’ SA Chart career. They had the same hit count as The Sandpipers with ‘Yummy Yummy Yummy’ being their only other chart hit, and the same number of weeks i.e. 21 and also had the same best peak with their first hit going to number 2. Despite The Sandpipers’ second hit going 1 place better than Ohio Express’ second hit, the latter managed to accumulate more points, getting 251 during their time on the charts while The Sandpipers managed 242.

It was 38 weeks since we had last seen an act have 2 in the charts at the same time when The Bee Gees had ‘I’ve Gotta Get A Message To You’ and ‘To Love Somebody’ occupy the same top 20. This week Creedence Clearwater Revival revived that setup as they became the 31st act to see 2 hits in the same chart. ‘Bad Moon Rising’ joined ‘Proud Mary’ in the top 20 to be Creedence’s 2nd SA chart hit. As with ‘Proud Mary’, ‘Bad Moon Rising’ was a John Fogerty composition and was also a number 2 hit in the US. In the UK it would fare better than ‘Proud Mary’s peak of 8 going all the way to the top of the charts there where it would spend 3 weeks. The song was ranked number 364 on Rolling Stone magazine’s Top 500 Songs Of All Time List published in 2004.

The 1910 Fruitgum Company returned to the charts for a 4th outing. Their new one was ‘Special Delivery’ which had been a number 38 hit for them in the US. The song was written by the same song writing team of Bobby Bloom and Bo Gentry that had brought us their previous hit, ‘Indian Giver’. The pair had also had song writing credits on Tommy James & The Shondells’ ‘Mony Mony’ so both had 3 hits to their names now. This was the 3rd song to chart with the word ‘Special’ in the title (previous 2 being Percy Sledge’s ‘My Special Prayer’ and The Vogues ‘My Special Angel’) and would also be the last to do so.

The final new entry was ‘Frozen Orange Juice’ which was a 2nd hit for Peter Sarstedt. As with his previous hit, ‘Where Do You Go To My Lovely’, Sarstedt penned the song but he would not repeat the success of his earlier hit with ‘Frozen Orange Juice’ not charting in the US (where ‘Where Do You Go To’ went to 70) and made number 10 in the UK, not matching his earlier chart topping feat. Sarstedt was born in India to British parents. His older brother was Eden Kane who had 5 top 10 hits in the UK in the 60s and his younger brother Clive would have a number 3 hit in the UK with ‘My Resistance Is Low’ going under the name Robin Sarstedt.

With 2 of the 3 new entries being by US acts and 1 being by a UK act, the gap between the 2 nations for hit count was now down to just 2 with the Brits on 204 and the Americans on 202.

Leapy Lee became the 10th act in 11 weeks to reach the 20 weeks on the charts milestone while Tommy Roe was busy celebrating his 60th. This, however, was not enough to move him up the weeks count list and he sat at 15, 5 weeks behind 14th placed Cliff Richard. Sandie Shaw was also not moving up the list, but she no longer shared 17th spot with The Tremeloes and Lucille Starr as her 54 to date placed her 1 ahead of the aforementioned. Similarly, Dickie Loader stayed 8th on the local list with 23 weeks to his name, but he no longer shared the spot with Carike Keuzenkamp and Hilary who dropped to tied 9th.

Herman’s Hermits eased past the 900 points mark as they ticked over to 901 points. They were the 9th act to reach this mark.

Youtube playlist:

18 July 1969

hermans_hermits_my_sentimental_friend

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 My Sentimental Friend  – Herman’s Hermits
2 2 7 Time of the Season  – Zombies
3 4 7 The Boxer  – Simon & Garfunkel
4 7 4 Little Yellow Aeroplane  – Leapy Lee
5 3 9 Proud Mary  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
6 10 4 Time is Tight  – Booker T & The MG’s
7 8 5 Heather Honey  – Tommy Roe
8 14 3 Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’  – Crazy Elephant
9 5 6 Think it All Over  – Sandie Shaw
10 6 11 Hair  – Cowsills
11 16 2 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
12 13 6 Israelites  – Desmond Dekker
13 12 9 Young Love Can Hurt  – Dickie Loader
14 9 9 Mercy  – Ohio Express
15 18 3 Montreal  – Judy Page Ft Kimbo
16 17 4 Gitarzan  – Ray Stevens
17 11 7 Kumbaya  – Sandpipers
18 New 1 Man of the World  – Fleetwood Mac
19 New 1 Love Theme from “Romeo & Juliet”  – Henry Mancini
20 New 1 Turn Around  – Ken J. Larkin

It was now 4 weeks in a row at 1 for Herman’s Hermits’ ‘My Sentimental Friend’ while The Zombies still applied pressure, their ‘Time Of The Season’ sitting at 2 for a second week.

Crazy Elephant followed up last week’s star rater climb with another one, but this time they also took the biggest climber award as ‘Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’ moved up 6 places from 14 to 8.

Last week’s biggest climber, Booker T & The MG’s ‘Time Is Tight’ managed a 4 place star rater climb. It landed at number 6. The Archies’ ‘Sugar, Sugar’ was the only other star rater this week, moving up 5 from 16 to 11.

The Sandpipers’ ‘pervious hit, ‘Guantanamera’ was the biggest faller twice. This week their second hit, ‘Kumbaya’, took its first such award with a 6 place drop from 11 to 17 to bring the band’s total to 3 biggest fallers.

Clodagh Rodgers ‘Come Back And Shake Me’ dropped off the top 20 after 4 weeks and a peak of 17. This would be her only SA chart offering.

Tom Jones’ please to ‘Love Me Tonight’ fell on deaf ears this week as the song left the charts after 7 weeks and a peak of 15. His previous 4 hits had all reached double figures for weeks, but that run was now broken. Also, the peak of 15 equalled the lowest to date for a song spending 7 in the charts. The Troggs’ ‘Little Girl’ was the only other song so far to manage this.

Last of the leavers was The Bee Gees’ ‘First Of May’ which spent 11 weeks on the charts and peaked at 4. This was the lowest peak of their last 3 hits, but the band could still boast 7 of their 8 singles having gone top 10 and 6 of those 7 went top 5. ‘First Of May’ had been the oldest on last week’s chart and the new oldest song was The Cowsills’ ‘Hair’ which sat on 10 weeks.

Back in 1969 Peter Green was still a member of Fleetwood Mac and it was his composition ‘Man Of The World’ that was our first new entry this week. The song had given the band a number 2 hit in the UK and it would go to 12 in Holland and 8 in Rhodesia as it was then. It did not appear on any of their albums until the 1971 ‘Greatest Hits’ package.

Henry Mancini’s ‘Love Theme from “Romeo & Juliet”’ was the 18th instrumental piece to chart on our top 20. This made this week the 28th one where we had at least 2 instrumentals in the top 20 (the other being Booker T & The MG’s ‘Time Is Tight’), but it was a little way off the record to date 4 we had seen. Taken from Franco Zeffirelli’s film adaptation of the Shakespeare play, ‘Love Theme from “Romeo & Juliet”’ would spend 2 weeks at the top of the US charts, ousting The Beatle’s’ ‘Get Back’ from number there in the process. It would also top the Billboard Easy Listening Singles chart in the US where it took over the top spot from Andy Williams’ ‘Happy Heart’ which had left our charts a few weeks earlier. The song also had the honours of being the 200th by an American act to chart. The Yanks were now just 3 hits behind the Poms.

The final new entry was Ken J. Larkin’s ‘Turn Around’. This boosted the local content of the charts to 3 hits as Larkin join Judy Page and Dickie Loader in the top 20. Larkin was born in 1950 in Port Elizabeth and around 1984 he moved from pop singing into Gospel music and continues to work in this genre. ‘Turn Around’ was a cover of a song written by Les Reed and Barry Mason and recorded by Tony Christie. It gave Reed his 14th SA chart hits as a song writer and Mason his 13th. They occupied the number 1 and 2 spots on the number of hits by a song writer list. Larkin’s version of ‘Turn Around’ was produced by Billy Forrest and it would top the LM Radio.

All 3 acts on the new entries this week were enjoying their 1st hits with us.

Sandie Shaw climbed to number 17 on the weeks count list, her 53 to date putting her level with Lucille Starr and The Tremeloes. On the local front Dickie Loader moved tied 8th with Carike Keuzenkamp and Hilary, all 3 acts were sitting on 22 weeks.

Youtube playlist:

11 July 1969

hermans_hermits_my_sentimental_friend

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 My Sentimental Friend  – Herman’s Hermits
2 3 6 Time of the Season  – Zombies
3 2 8 Proud Mary  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
4 6 6 The Boxer  – Simon & Garfunkel
5 4 5 Think it All Over  – Sandie Shaw
6 5 10 Hair  – Cowsills
7 12 3 Little Yellow Aeroplane  – Leapy Lee
8 11 4 Heather Honey  – Tommy Roe
9 10 8 Mercy  – Ohio Express
10 16 3 Time is Tight  – Booker T & The MG’s
11 8 6 Kumbaya  – Sandpipers
12 9 8 Young Love Can Hurt  – Dickie Loader
13 13 5 Israelites  – Desmond Dekker
14 19 2 Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’  – Crazy Elephant
15 7 11 First of May  – Bee Gees
16 New 1 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
17 18 3 Gitarzan  – Ray Stevens
18 20 2 Montreal  – Judy Page Ft Kimbo
19 14 7 Love Me Tonight  – Tom Jones
20 17 4 Come Back and Shake Me  – Clodagh Rodgers

Herman’s Hermits’ ‘My Sentimental Friend’ moved into its 3rd consecutive week at the top of the charts, seeing off the threat from The Zombies’ ‘Time Of The Season’ which moved up a place to 2 while former number 1, Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Proud Mary’ dropped to 3.

This week saw the 11th time that the biggest climber was an instrumental hit as Booker T & The MG’s ‘Time Is Tight’ climbed 6 from 16 to 10. Of the 17 instrumentals to charts, 9 of them had taken biggest climber honours with 2 of those 9 (Roger Williams’ ‘’Lara’s Theme (From Dr Zhivago)’ and Whistling Jack Smith’s ‘I Was Kaiser Bill’s Batman’) managing biggest climber twice.

As with his previous hit, ‘Little Arrows’, Leapy Lee’s ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ managed a star rater climb 2 weeks running. This week it moved up 5 from 12 to 7 to give Leapy his 4th star rater. Crazy Elephant’s ‘Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’ was the other star rater this week, moving up 5 from 19 to 14.

Number of biggest fallers became 1 category of statistic where Tom Jones was not the outright leader as The Bee Gees joined him on 8 as their hit, ‘First Of May’ was the faller this week, dropping 8 from 8 to 15. There would be 2 other acts that would collect their 8th biggest faller with an 8 place drop. So far there had been 18 occasions where an act had seen the number of places fallen equal the number of biggest fallers they had had. The Bee Gees had seen it happen 3 times (on 5, 7 and 8) while The Hollies and The Beach Boys managed it twice.

Despite being the biggest faller, The Bee Gees could take heart from the fact that ‘First Of May’ was the oldest on the chart, ticking over to 11 weeks with us.

We said goodbye to the Tremeloes ‘Hello World’ which had been with us for 9 weeks and peaked at 5. It was the first of their 4 hits to date not to reach double figures for weeks and was their lowest peak so far with 2 of their previous 3 topping the charts and the other one getting to number 2.

The Archies enjoyed a 3rd hit with us as ‘Sugar, Sugar’ entered the charts at 16. The song was by far their most successful, topping the charts on both sides of the Atlantic (for 4 weeks in the US and 7 weeks in the UK where it would be their only charting hit). It would also go to number 1 in Austria, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Norway, Spain and Rhodesia (as it was then). It would be a 3rd hit as song writer for Andy Kim and a 6th for co-writer Jeff Barry. In 1970 Wilson Pickett would take a cover of the song to number 25 in the US.

The Americans had lagged behind the Brits for hit count over the last few months, but they were beginning to close the gap. They now sat on 198 just 5 behind the total of 203 for acts from the UK. Local acts were sitting on 84.

The Bee Gees reached the 80 weeks mark this week, but this was not enough to move them up the weeks count list. They remained at 8 and were 1 week behind The Hollies and Manfred Mann. There were 3 other acts which reached milestones for their weeks count and they were Simon & Garfunkel who hit 30 weeks and The Sandpipers and Ohio Express who both ticked over to 20 weeks.

Sandi Shaw drew level 19th on the weeks count list with Jim Reeves, they both had 52 weeks to their name. This meant that The Staccatos and The Monkees dropped off the top 20 of that list. Dickie Loader moved on to 21 weeks and now sat tied 10th with Billy Forrest on the local weeks count list.

The Bee Gees became the 5th act to hit the 1000 points mark as they moved on to 1001 while Sandie Shaw became the second woman to move past 600 as her total ticked over to 608. She was 18th overall for points with Petula Clark being the only female artists above her. Petula was on 673 points.

The average number of weeks the song on this week’s top 20 had been in the charts moved above 5 again as it worked out at 5.45. The last 7 weeks had seen this average sitting below 5.

Youtube playlist:

4 July 1969

hermans_hermits_my_sentimental_friend

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 My Sentimental Friend  – Herman’s Hermits
2 2 7 Proud Mary  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
3 6 5 Time of the Season  – Zombies
4 5 4 Think it All Over  – Sandie Shaw
5 3 9 Hair  – Cowsills
6 7 5 The Boxer  – Simon & Garfunkel
7 4 10 First of May  – Bee Gees
8 9 5 Kumbaya  – Sandpipers
9 10 7 Young Love Can Hurt  – Dickie Loader
10 11 7 Mercy  – Ohio Express
11 13 3 Heather Honey  – Tommy Roe
12 18 2 Little Yellow Aeroplane  – Leapy Lee
13 14 4 Israelites  – Desmond Dekker
14 12 6 Love Me Tonight  – Tom Jones
15 8 9 Hello World  – Tremeloes
16 19 2 Time is Tight  – Booker T & The MG’s
17 17 3 Come Back and Shake Me  – Clodagh Rodgers
18 20 2 Gitarzan  – Ray Stevens
19 New 1 Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’  – Crazy Elephant
20 New 1 Montreal  – Judy Page Ft Kimbo

Herman’s Hermits’ ‘My Sentimental Friend’ enjoyed a second week at number 1 with the previous chart topper, Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Proud Mary’ still hanging around at 2. The Zombies’ ‘Time Of the Season’ also posed a threat to the Hermits’ dominance as the song moved up 3 to 3.

Leapy Lee picked up a 3 biggest leap as ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ moved up 6 places from 18 to 12 to add to the 2 times ‘Little Arrows’ had picked up the award. ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ was the only song to manage a star rater climb this week.

The Tremeloes’ ‘Hello World’ was moving down quicker than any other song this week as it fell 7 from 8 to 15. This was only their second biggest faller award. Of the acts that had had 10 or more star rater climbs so far, only The Tremeloes and Nancy Sinatra had such a low biggest faller count.

The Bee Gees’ ‘First Of May’ continued on as the oldest on the chart. It was on 10 weeks and this was its second week as the oldest.

Andy William’s heart would not have been so glad as his hit ‘Happy Heart’ dropped off the top 20 after just 2 weeks with us and a highest position of 16. The good news for the crooner was that there was still more hits to come from him.

We also bid farewell to The Who’s ‘Pinball Wizard’. It was the 19th song to have an equal weeks and peak figure with the song lasting 6 weeks and peaking at 6. This was the 3rd song to peak at 6 during a 6 week run. Like Andy Williams, there was more to come from The Who.

The first of the new entries was ‘Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’ by Crazy Elephant. The song would make it to number 12 on both the UK and US charts. 10cc’s Kevin Godley would take lead vocals on ‘There Ain’t No Umbopo’ a future b-side for the band, but he was not the vocalist on ‘Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’ although it is not clear who was. The album from which the song was taken (called ‘Crazy Elephant’) credits Larry Alufer, Kenny Cohen and Hal King with vocals, although King is the only one who is not credited with any instruments so could well have sang the song. Joey Levine would pick up a 5th song writing credit with the song while for co-writer Ritchie Cordell it would be his 4th.

It had been 41 weeks since we last saw a duet or collaboration on our charts and that previous one was Union Gap Ft Gary Puckett’s ‘Young Girl’ This week we saw a new combination make the charts and that was local lass Judy Page with her daughter Kimbo. Kimbo later became better known as Kim Kallie and also went under the name Margino. The new song was ‘Montreal’ which had been written by the 4 members of The Bats. It arrived in the charts 107 weeks after we last saw Judy in the top 20 and this was the biggest gap between hits to date for a local female artist and the 3rd biggest for a local act. Co-incidentally, the act which had the second biggest gap between hits for a local act was The Bats. It was the second biggest gap for a female artist of any nationality and the 12 biggest overall.

Dickie Loader became the 8th act in 9 weeks to reach the 20 weeks mark. However, reaching this landmark did not help his progress up the local weeks count list as he was unmoved at 11. Percy Sledge dropped from 15 to 16 on the overall weeks count list as Tommy Roe moved 1 ahead of him to 57 weeks. Roe was at 15 on his own now. The Tremeloes climbed to tied 17th with Lucille Starr as their 53 weeks to date equalled those of Starr.

Roe was also passing milestones on the points front as he moved passed the 700 mark on to 703.

This week also set a new record of 6 songs having one word titles. This beat the previous record of 5 that we saw last week. The one word songs this week were ‘Hair’, ‘Kumbaya’, ‘Mercy’, ‘Israelites’, ‘Gitarzan’ and ‘Montreal’.

Youtube playlist:

27 June 1969

hermans_hermits_my_sentimental_friend

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 5 My Sentimental Friend  – Herman’s Hermits
2 1 6 Proud Mary  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
3 3 8 Hair  – Cowsills
4 4 9 First of May  – Bee Gees
5 6 3 Think it All Over  – Sandie Shaw
6 8 4 Time of the Season  – Zombies
7 9 4 The Boxer  – Simon & Garfunkel
8 5 8 Hello World  – Tremeloes
9 12 4 Kumbaya  – Sandpipers
10 11 6 Young Love Can Hurt  – Dickie Loader
11 7 6 Mercy  – Ohio Express
12 13 5 Love Me Tonight  – Tom Jones
13 16 2 Heather Honey  – Tommy Roe
14 18 3 Israelites  – Desmond Dekker
15 14 6 Pinball Wizard  – Who
16 20 2 Happy Heart  – Andy Williams
17 19 2 Come Back and Shake Me  – Clodagh Rodgers
18 New 1 Little Yellow Aeroplane  – Leapy Lee
19 New 1 Time is Tight  – Booker T & The MG’s
20 New 1 Gitarzan  – Ray Stevens

Herman’s Hermits set a new record for the biggest gap between number 1 hits as ‘My Sentimental Friend’ took over the top spot this week 206 weeks after they had last sat there with ‘Mrs Brown You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter’ back on 9 July 1965. This comprehensively beat the existing gap record of 123 weeks that Tommy Roe had held. Previous number 1, Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Proud Mary’ lasted just 2 weeks at the top of the charts. Geoff Stephens joined the 3 Gibb brothers, Les Reed and Reg Presley at the top of the list for number of number 1’s for a song writer as he had writing credits on 3 number 1 now, ‘Winchester Cathedral’ by The New Vaudeville Band, ‘Sorry Suzanne’ by The Hollies and the new number 1 this week.

As the biggest climb this week was just 4 places, the biggest climbers and the star raters were the same songs. There were 2 songs that managed the 4 place jump and they were Desmond Dekker’s ‘Israelites’ and Andy Williams’ ‘Happy Heart’ which landed at 14 and 16 respectively.

The biggest fall was also 4 places and it was only Ohio Express’ ‘Mercy’ that managed that, dropping to 11 from 7.

Matt Hurter’s ‘Bicycle Bill’ fell off the charts after just 2 weeks in the top 20. It peaked at 17 and Matt would not be getting back on his bike after this setback as this would be all we would see of him on the SA charts.

Joe South’s ‘Games People Play’ also left the charts. It had had a run of 11 weeks, 2 of which were spent at the number 1 spot. This would be his only chart hit as an artist, but we would see him return as a song writer to add to his total of 3 song writing credits to date.

Last to go was The 1910 Fruitgum Company’s ‘Indian Giver’ which managed 13 weeks on the charts and, like ‘Games People Play’, spent 2 of them at number 1. It was the 17th song to leave the charts from within the top 20 as it spent its last week at 10. This was the 7th song in the space of 9 weeks to leave from 10 or higher and the 3rd week running we had seen a song leave from position 10. ‘Indian Giver’ had been the oldest on last week’s chart and The Bee Gees’ ‘First Of May’ was the new oldest.

Leapy Lee became the second act to chart with 2 different songs which both started with the word ‘Little’. The previous act to do this was The Troggs who had hits with ‘Little Girl’ and ‘Little Red Donkey’.  Lee’s ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ followed up his only other hit to date, ‘Little Arrows’ and was the first of 3 new entries this week. There would be 1 more act to have 2 songs chart starting with the word ‘Little’. In total 27 acts would chart with 2 songs starting with the same word (excluding ‘The’ and ‘A’) 10 of which would have 2 starting with ‘I’, 1 would be Murray Campbell charting with a solo version of ‘Goodbye My Love’ and again with same song as part of a duet with Virginia Lee. No act would manage 3 songs starting with the same word. ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ was written by John Rostill who also brought us Cliff Richard & The Shadows’ ‘In The Country’.  Unlike his previous ‘Little’ hit, this Yellow Aeroplane would fail to get off the ground in the US, the UK or Europe. According to the information given on the Youtube video of this, the song had some local popularity in Australia, charting in some of the provinces, but it did not make the main Australian charts.

Booker T & The MG’s brought us the 17th instrumental song to chart as ‘Time Is Tight’ was our second new entry this week. The song would go to 4 in the UK and 6 in the US. The song writing credits were shared between members of the group, all of whom were having their first SA hit

except for Steve Cropper who had had song writing credits on Otis Redding’s ‘(Sittin’ No The) Dock Of The Bay’. ‘Time Is Tight’ was from the soundtrack to the 1968 film ‘Uptight’ which starred Raymond St. Jacques and Ruby Dee and was directed by Jules Dassin.

Our final new entry was a comedy record by Ray Stevens called ‘Gitarzan’. It would give Stevens a number 8 hit in the US, but would fail to chart in the UK. Just under 5 years later Stevens would top the UK charts with another novelty record called ‘The Streak’. Stevens was born Harold Ray Ragsdale on 24 January 1939 and has been inducted into the Nashville, Georgia and Christian Music Halls of Fame.

Sandie Shaw became the 3rd female artist to reach the 50 weeks in the charts milestone. She followed Petula Clark and Lucille Starr in achieving this. The Cowsills became the 57th act to reach 20 weeks.

Tommy Roe moved tied 15th with Percy Sledge on the weeks count list. They had 56 to their names. The Tremeloes were also moving up the list, their 52 to date putting them tied 18th with Jim Reeves. On the local list, Dickie Loader moved 1 week clear of Jody Wayne and The Square Set to be at number 11 on his own. He sat on 19 weeks.

Tom Jones was racking up the points and this week he moved past the 1600 mark as he ticked over to 1608. He was way out in front for this with nearest rival, The Troggs being on 1286.

As a final note, this week equalled the record to date for number of 1 word song titles on the top 20 as we had 5 of them.

Youtube playlist:

20 June 1969

creedence-clearwater-revival-proud-mary-liberty-3

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 5 Proud Mary  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
2 3 4 My Sentimental Friend  – Herman’s Hermits
3 2 7 Hair  – Cowsills
4 5 8 First of May  – Bee Gees
5 8 7 Hello World  – Tremeloes
6 19 2 Think it All Over  – Sandie Shaw
7 6 5 Mercy  – Ohio Express
8 15 3 Time of the Season  – Zombies
9 16 3 The Boxer  – Simon & Garfunkel
10 4 13 Indian Giver  – 1910 Fruitgum Company
11 14 5 Young Love Can Hurt  – Dickie Loader
12 17 3 Kumbaya  – Sandpipers
13 13 4 Love Me Tonight  – Tom Jones
14 7 5 Pinball Wizard  – Who
15 9 11 Games People Play  – Joe South
16 New 1 Heather Honey  – Tommy Roe
17 18 2 Bicycle Bill  – Matt Hurter
18 20 2 Israelites  – Desmond Dekker
19 New 1 Come Back and Shake Me  – Clodagh Rodgers
20 New 1 Happy Heart  – Andy Williams

‘Proud Mary’ enjoyed a second week at number 1 while the previous chart topper, The Cowsills’ ‘Hair’ dropped from 2 to 3, allowing Herman’s Hermits’ ‘My Sentimental Friend’ into second place. Their previous 2 hits had both stalled at 3, so things were looking promising for the band.

The last time we saw a solo female take biggest climber was 12 weeks previously when Sandie Shaw’s ‘Monsieur DuPont’ took the honours. This week it was once again Shaw who had the climber of the week as ‘Think It All Over’ jumped a massive 13 places from 19 to 6. This was the biggest climbed in a week by a song by a solo female artist to date, beating the 12 places that Sandy Posey’s ‘Single Girl’ and Mary Hopkin’s ‘Those Were The Days’ had managed.

Joining Sandie in a star rater climb were The Zombies’ ‘Time Of The Season’ (up 7 to 8), Simon & Garfunkel’s ‘The Boxer’ (up 7 to 9) and The Sandpipers’ ‘Kumbaya’ (up 5 to 12). These all contributed to this week have the second biggest total movement upwards (i.e. adding up all the places climbed by all the songs moving up this week) as this totalled 43, falling just 3 short of the 46 places songs moved up on 4 October 1968. This was the 4th time we had seen this figure equal 40 or more.

The Who’s ‘Pinball Wizard’ fell 7 this week to give the band their first biggest faller while The 1910 Fruitgum Company’s ‘Indian Giver’ enjoyed its 5th week as the oldest on the charts. The band had now clocked up a total of 9 weeks with an oldest song in the top 20 as previous hit, ‘Simon Says’ was the oldest for 4 weeks.

The songs leaving the charts this week were bunched up at 12, 11 and 10 last week. The one that was at 12 was Johnny Rivers’ ‘Everyday I Have To Cry’ which, like his very first hit, ‘(I Washed My Hands In) Muddy Water’ lasted 6 weeks on the charts, but went 1 place higher, peaking at 8.

Peter Sarstedt’s ‘Where Do you Go To My Lovely’ departed from the charts after 8 weeks, 1 of which was spent at number 1. It lasted just 4 weeks in the charts after leaving the top spot and joined 4 other songs that had fallen out the top 20 so quickly after vacating the top spot (The Hollies’ ‘Sorry Suzanne’, Frank Sinatra’s ‘Strangers In The Night’ and Tommy Roe’s ‘Dizzy’) but was 1 week slower than the quickest fall from grace which was 3 weeks by the Turtles’ ‘She’d Rather Be With Me’. Excluding songs on the first and last charts, this was the first of just 2 songs that would top the charts, but spend less than 10 weeks in the top 20.

The Equals’ ‘Softly Softly’ became the 9th song to leave the charts from number 10 (the highest place to leave the charts from so far was 9 which 7 songs had managed). The song had enjoyed a 7 week run with us which was exactly half the 14 weeks their only other hit to date, ‘Baby Come Back’ had managed. ‘Softly Softly’ peaked at number 8.

Tommy Roe’s 5th hit to grace our charts was ‘Heather Honey’ which arrived at number 16 this week. Like his previous 4 he had written the song himself (‘Dizzy’ being the only one where he had co-writing credits) and it would see him reach number 24 in the UK and 29 in the US. It was his 15th Hot 100 hit in the US.

The number of hits by solo female artists in the charts doubled this week as Clodagh Rodgers joined Sandie Shaw in the top 20. Her hit was ‘Come Back And Shake Me’ which had been a number 3 hit for her in the UK. Clodagh hailed from Country Antrim in Northern Ireland (which means she is classified as being from the UK) and would represent the UK in the 1971 Eurovision Song Competition where she performed ‘Jack In The Box’ and finished 9th.

The final new entry was Andy Williams’ ‘Happy Heart’. The song was written by Jackie Rae and James Last. It was a 3rd chart hit as song writer for Last who had charted twice with 2 different versions of ‘Games That Lovers Play’. ‘Happy Heart’ would be Williams’ 38th Hot 100 hit in the US, going to number 22 there and would be his first top 30 hit in the US since 1964’s ‘Dear Heart; which went to 24. The moral of the story for Andy was have the word ‘Heart’ in the title of your songs as none of the 7 songs that charted for him in between ‘Dear Hear’ and ‘Happy Heart’ would make the top 30. In the UK ‘Happy Heart’ would go to number 19.

Herman’s Hermits moved 1 week clear of The Hollies and Manfred Mann, their 82 weeks to date giving them 5th spot of the weeks count list to themselves. The Bee Gees shook off Engelbert Humperdinck to have 8th spot to themselves with 77 weeks to their name while The Tremeloes’ moved into tied 19th spot with The Monkees and The Staccatos. All 3 acts were on 51 weeks. On the local list Dickie Loader moved into tied 11th place with Jody Wayne and The Square Set as his total ticked over to 18 weeks.

Herman’s Hermits moved past the 800 points mark, there total of 803 placing them 10th overall for points.

Youtube playlist: