4 March 1966

yesterday_man_chris_andrews

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Yesterday Man  – Chris Andrews
2 6 3 The Sounds of Silence  – Simon & Garfunkel
3 2 6 Jimmy Come Lately  – Four Jacks & a Jill
4 7 4 1-2-3  – Len Barry
5 5 13 Wind Me Up, Let Me Go  – Cliff Richard
6 4 9 We Can Work it Out  – Beatles
7 3 12 Get Off My Cloud  – Rolling Stones
8 16 3 Michelle  – Overlanders
9 9 4 I’ll Step Aside  – Tony Wells
10 New 1 These Boots are Made for Walking  – Nancy Sinatra
11 10 12 The Carnival is Over  – Seekers
12 11 4 It’s My Life  – Animals
13 8 5 Let Me Be  – Turtles
14 18 2 Keep On Running  – Spencer Davis Group
15 12 7 Thunderball  – Tom Jones
16 17 3 I’ll Step Aside  – Ronnie Wilson
17 13 10 Treat Her Right  – Roy Head and The Traits
18 New 1 The Ballad of the Green Berets  – Sgt Barry Sadler
19 New 1 Yes Mr. Peters  – Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman
20 New 1 I’ve Got Everything You Need Babe  – Gene Rockwell

Chris Andrews enjoyed a 4th straight week at number 1 and became the second song to manage this with The Beach Boys’ ‘California Girls’ being the other one. Murray Campbell’s total of 6 weeks at the top of the charts with ‘Goodbye My Love’ was managed in 2 separate runs of 3 weeks each.

The biggest climb award went to The Overlanders’ ‘Michelle’ which jumped 8 places from 16 to 8 and in reaching this position, it overtook the previous (and only other to date) Beatles cover, Matt Monro’s ‘Yesterday’, for best peak by a Beatles cover. Also moving up was previous week’s biggest climber, Simon & Garfunkel’s ‘The Sounds Of Silence’ and one of last week’s new entries, The Spencer Davis Group’s ‘Keep On Running’ which both climbed 4 to land at 2 and 14 respectively.

The Turtles ‘Let Me Be’ was the faller of the week as it dropped 5 places from 8 to 13.

The Staccatos’ ‘Come Back Silly Girl’ which was the oldest on last week’s chart, fell off the top 20 this week. It had spent 17 weeks in the charts and peaked at number 2. Its departure meant that Cliff Richard’s ‘Wind Me Up, Let Me Go’ had a lucky 13 as it was now the oldest on the chart while enjoying its 13th week in the top 20.

The Four Seasons’ ‘Let’s Hang On’ just couldn’t and became the second song (excluding those that were only on the first ever chart) to spend just 1 week in the charts. The previous song to manage this was Eddie Rambeau’s version of ‘Concrete and Clay’ which was replaced by the more successful version of the song by Unit Four Plus Two. The Four Seasons would see further chart action in SA.

The Fortunes’ ‘Here It Comes Again’ was not relevant to the song anymore and neither did it apply to the group as its departure from the top 20 ended the band’s SA chart career. The song spent 10 weeks in the top 20 and peaked at 8. In total The Fortunes had 2 hits, spent 20 weeks in the charts and had a best peak of 6 with their other hit, ‘You’ve Got Your Troubles’.

Leaving the chart from number 14 last week, was The A-Cads’ ‘Hungry For Love’. It spent 14 weeks in the top 20, 2 of which were at the top spot. The exit position of 14 was the second highest last week position for a local song to date with only Gene Rockwell’s ‘Ciao’, which fell off the charts from13, having a higher final position.

The highest new entry this week was Nancy Sinatra’s ‘These Boots Are Made For Walking’ which thrashed the record highest position for a new entry to date as the previous best (managed by 6 different songs) was to debut at number 15. Nancy came flying into the charts at number 10. This would also be the all-time highest debut position for a song by a woman with 2 other hits by women managing to equal this. The song would top both the UK and US charts (for 4 and 1 week(s) respectively) and would give song writer, Lee Hazelwood his second SA chart hit, his previous being Dean Martin’s ‘Houston’. This was also the 30th song to chart by an American act.

The second new entry was Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler’s ‘The Ballad of the Green Berets’. Sadler was recovering from a leg wound picked up in the Vietnam war when he wrote the song with author Robin Moore. The song would knock Nancy Sinatra’s ‘These Boots…’, a co-new entry this week in SA, off the top of the US charts and stay at number 1 there for 5 weeks. In the UK it made it to number 24. Sadler died on 5 November 1989 aged 49 from complications from a gunshot wound he sustained on 7 September 1988 when he was accidently shot in the head by someone pursuing a robber.

We welcomed our first Canadian on to the charts, but he came as part of a duet. Steve Karliski was born in Winnipeg and charted alongside California born Mimi Roman as the pair brought us the song ‘Yes, Mr Peters’. Karliski co-wrote the song with Larry Kolber (who would also pen Jody Wayne’s ‘Patches’ and Jonathan Butler’s ‘I Love How You Love Me’) and it would be a number 1 hit on the US Country Singles charts for Roy Drusky and Pricilla Mitchell but the Karliski/Roman version would not chart there.

Our final new entry was the 20th by a local act to chart and the 4th for Gene Rockwell, putting Rockwell at the top of the list for number of hits, equalling Tom Jones and The Rolling Stones. His new hit was ‘I’ve Got Everything You Need Babe’ which was written by Al Kooper (his first to chart in SA) and Irwin Levine who, ironically had brought us ‘Little Lonely One’, one of Tom Jones’ 4 hits to date. The song was originally recorded by Bern Elliott & The Fenman, but did not chart for them. They did, however, manage 2 UK chart hits.

Gene Rockwell moved into 7th place on the list of weeks on the chart with 24 under his belt, he was now 1 week clear of Elvis who sat 8th on 23 weeks. Also moving up that list was Cliff Richard who went tied 12th with The Ivy League on 18 weeks.

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