11 October 1968

cornelia_picking_up_pebbles

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 5 4 Picking Up Pebbles  – Cornelia
2 4 4 1, 2, 3 Red Light  – 1910 Fruitgum Company
3 1 6 For Your Precious Love  – Flames
4 2 9 Help Yourself  – Tom Jones
5 9 3 My Special Prayer  – Percy Sledge
6 3 5 Sunshine Girl  – Herman’s Hermits
7 19 2 Those Were the Days  – Mary Hopkin
8 10 4 Do it Again  – Beach Boys
9 6 11 Take Time to Know Her  – Percy Sledge
10 11 5 To Love Somebody  – Bee Gees
11 8 13 Baby Come Back  – Equals
12 7 8 Hurdy Gurdy Man  – Donovan
13 New 1 I’ve Gotta Get a Message to You  – Bee Gees
14 15 17 Sunglasses  – Hilary
15 13 7 Dream a Little Dream of Me  – Mamas and The Papas
16 20 2 Indian Lake  – Cowsills
17 New 1 Little Arrows  – Leapy Lee
18 17 5 Gotta See Jane  – R. Dean Taylor
19 18 8 Crystal Chandelier  – Stu Phillips
20 14 10 Butchers and Bakers  – Staccatos

This week saw the 3rd time a local song took over the top spot from another local song as Cornelia’s ‘Picking Up Pebbles’ ousted The Flames’ ‘For Your Precious Love’ from number 1. The 2 previous this had happened was when Carike Keuzenkamp’s version of ‘Timothy’ had knocked Four Jacks & A Jill’s version off the top spot and when Hilary’s ‘Sunglasses’ ousted Quentin E. Klopjaeger’s ‘Lazy Life’. Cornelia was now the 3rd local woman to top our charts and all 3 had done so by replacing another local song at the top. This also marked a milestone 10 local chart toppers to date.

Mary Hopkin’s ‘Those Were The Days’ became the 7th song to climb 12 or more in a week and the second (after Sandy Posey’s ‘Single Girl’) by a solo female to do so as it moved up to number 7.

Apart from the massive biggest climber this week, there were 3 other songs that made star rater climbs and all of them were 4 place jumps. Cornelia’s ‘Picking Up Pebbles’ moved up 4 to gain the number 1 spot (3 songs had had bigger jumps to 1 and 1 other had jumped 4 to get to the top spot), Percy Sledge’s ‘My Special Prayer’ moved up to 5 and The Cowsill’s ‘Indian Lake’ moved up to 16. It was Cornelia’s 3rd star rater and Percy Sledge’s 7th while it was a first for the other 2 artists.

The Staccatos picked up their 5th biggest faller as ‘Butchers And Bakers’ dropped 6 places from 14 to 20. They now led the way for number of biggest fallers for a local group, pulling 1 clear of Four Jacks And A Jill.

Hilary’s ‘Sunglasses’ enjoyed a 4th week as the oldest on the charts and actually gained a position, moving up from 15 to 14.

Petula Clark’s ‘Sailor’ sailed off the charts after 8 weeks with us. It had peaked at 9 during that time.

Also going was Timmy James & The Shondells’ ‘Mony Mony’ which had managed 10 weeks in the charts and peaked at 5. So far they had had 3 hits and all 3 had managed to get into double figures for weeks and make the top 10. This peak of 5 was their second highest after the 3 that ‘Hanky Panky’ managed (other hit ‘I Think We’re Alone Now’ made 8).

The Bee Gees became the 10th act to have 2 or more in the charts with 2 different combinations of songs (3 acts had managed 3 different combinations) as ‘I’ve Gotta Get a Message to You’ joined us while ‘To Love Somebody’ was still in the charts. It became their 6th hit to grace our top 20. The song would give the Gibb brothers their 2nd UK number 1 where it spent 1 week, and their first US top 10 hit, going to number 8 there. It would also give them a number 1 hit in Ireland and Italy and went top 10 in Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland and Zimbabwe. It was written with Percy Sledge in mind to record it and he eventually did so in 1970 but that version was not released.

Graham Pulleybank brought us our other new entry this week. However, he had changed his name twice before his hit arrived. After being Graham Pulleyman he changed to Lee Graham and eventually became famous under the guise of Leapy Lee. His hit ‘Little Arrows’ was the first of 2 hits he would have in the UK where it went to number 2. It would be his only US chart hit, peaking at 16 there. It would go to 8 in Canada and 2 in Australia as well as topping the Canadian country singles charts. The song would give first SA Chart hits to Albert Hammond and Mike Hazlewood as song writers. The duo would have further SA chart hits and Hammond would also chart as an artist.

The UK acts moved ahead again on the hits count list as both new entries were by Brits. They now had 160 to their name as opposed to the 158 the Americans had.

Both The 1910 Fruitgum Company and Hilary hit the 20 weeks in the charts milestone with Hilary being the 9th local act to reach this total. She sat 9th on the local weeks count list. The Mamas And The Papas took 16th place for themselves on the overall weeks count list as their 49 moved them 1 clear of Nancy Sinatra. The Bee Gees moved into 19th place with 45 to their name.

On the points front, Tom Jones became the first act to exceed 1,500 point as he moved on to a total of 1,508 while Herman’s Hermits passed the 600 mark, going to 608.

‘For Your Precious Love’ moved tied 12th for weeks by songs charting in more than 1 version. Its 14 weeks to date equalled that of ‘Everybody Knows’ which had been hits for Engelbert Humperdinck and The Dave Clark Five.

Lastly, this was the 7th time we had seen a local song occupy the top and bottom position on the charts with ‘Picking Up Pebbles’ at 1 and ‘Butchers And Bakers’ at 20. This was the 2nd song to be involved in this set up twice with Hilary’s ‘Sunglasses’ being at 1 on 2 occasions when a local song was at 20 while ‘Butchers And Bakers’ had been at 20 on 2 occasions when we had a local number 1.

Youtube playlist:

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “11 October 1968

  1. Saw Albert Hammond play Durban City Hall in 1974: he told the story of his breakthrough after years “in the clubs” when, having written “Little Arrows” for The Supremes, he was overjoyed to hear that the song had been accepted – only to find out that it had been given to … Leapy Lee!

  2. Hi John,
    Old Eagele-eye here again.
    SA Top 20 Charts
    THE WEEKLY SOUTH AFRICAN SINGLES CHART HISTORY
    17 November 1967
    Posted on August 14, 2015 by musicstats Standard
    Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
    1 2 5 Timothy – Four Jacks & a Jill
    2 1 7 The Last Waltz – Engelbert Humperdinck
    24 November 1967
    Posted on August 16, 2015 by musicstats Standard
    Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
    1 1 6 Timothy – Four Jacks & a Jill
    2 4 5 Timothy – Carike Keuzenkamp
    3 2 8 The Last Waltz – Engelbert Humperdinck
    1 December 1967
    Posted on August 18, 2015 by musicstats Standard
    Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
    1 2 6 Timothy – Carike Keuzenkamp
    2 4 4 Massachusetts – Bee Gees
    11 October 1968
    by musicstats

    This week saw the 4th time a local song took over the top spot from another local song as Cornelia’s ‘Picking Up Pebbles’ ousted The Flames’ ‘For Your Precious Love’ from number 1. 2 of the previous 3 times this had happened was when Carike Keuzenkamp’s version of ‘Timothy’ had knocked Four Jacks & A Jill’s version off the top spot and a week later the Four Jacks And A Jill’s version had regained it. The other time was when Hilary’s ‘Sunglasses’ ousted Quentin E. Klopjaeger’s ‘Lazy Life’. Cornelia was now the 3rd local woman to top our charts and all 3 had done so by replacing another local song at the top.
    According to the charts you published Four Jacks and a Jill was 2 weeks consecutive before Carike took top spot. So the statement is wrong or your charts are wrong. Please investigate and rectify to the correct information.

    Greetings

    Anton van Staden

    • Another great spot Anton. The charts were right, but my count of the times that a local act had taken over the top spot from another local act was off kilter. Carike’s version of ‘Timothy’ did take over from the Four Jacks & A Jill version, but it was knocked off the top spot by The Bee Gees’ ‘Massachusetts’ and not the Four Jacks & A Jill’s version of ‘Timothy’. Thanks again for keeping me on the straigh and narrow.
      John

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s