29 August 1969

sugar_sugar_archies

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
2 2 6 Bad Moon Rising  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
3 5 6 Special Delivery  – 1910 Fruitgum Company
4 4 6 Frozen Orange Juice  – Peter Sarstedt
5 3 10 Time is Tight  – Booker T & The MG’s
6 7 7 Turn Around  – Ken J. Larkin
7 12 3 Moonflight  – Vik Venus
8 9 5 Lights of Cincinatti  – Scott Walker
9 11 4 Tomorrow, Tomorrow  – Bee Gees
10 6 7 Love Theme from “Romeo & Juliet”  – Henry Mancini
11 15 3 Let Me  – Paul Revere & The Raiders
12 17 3 Good Morning Starshine  – Oliver
13 18 2 Saved by the Bell  – Robin Gibb
14 14 4 Cover Me  – Percy Sledge
15 10 4 These Eyes  – Guess Who
16 20 2 Baby Make it Soon  – Marmalade
17 19 2 Listen to the Band  – Monkees
18 New 1 Make Me an Island  – Joe Dolan
19 New 1 It Miek  – Desmond Dekker
20 New 1 I’d Rather Go Blind  – Chicken Shack

The Archies’ ‘Sugar, Sugar’ spent a second week at the top of the charts while Creedence Clearwater Revival was unmoved at 2. The 1910 Fruitgum Company’s ‘Special Delivery’ threw its hat into the ring as a further potential to take over the number 1 spot from The Archies, climbing 2 to 3.

We had 3 songs take biggest climber this week and 2 of the were space related as Vik Venus’ ‘Moonflight’ and Oliver’s ‘Good Morning Starshine’ both climbed 5 to land at 7 and 12 respectively. Robin Gibb’s ‘Saved By The Bell’ was an appropriate title for those not wanting to see 3 space related titles take biggest climber as the song also climbed 5 places and it landed up at 13.

There were 2 other songs that just missed out on being biggest climbers, but still managed star rater climbs and those were Marmalade’s ‘Baby Make It Soon’ (up 4 to 16) and Paul Revere & The Raiders’ ‘Let Me’, up 4 to 11.

The Guess Who’s ‘These Eyes’ was the faller of the week as it dropped 5 places from 10 to 15. Excluding the songs on the first ever chart, this was the 14th occasions where a song in its 4th week or less on the chart had been the biggest faller. ‘These Eyes’ was the 7th in its 4th week and we had seen 5 be biggest faller in their 3rd week and 2 in their 2nd week.

We said goodbye to Crazy Elephant’s ‘Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’ which had enjoyed a stay on the charts of 8 weeks and a peak of 3. This would be the band’s only showing on our top 20.

Another song which would be the artist’s only SA Chart hit, left the charts as well and that was The Edwin Hawkins Singers’ ‘Oh Happy Day’ which spent 4 weeks in the charts and peaked at 13.

Before this week we had seen 9 songs leave the chart from a record high position 9. This week we saw a new record as Leapy Lee’s ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ dropped straight out of the charts from number 8. This was also the 1st time we had seen songs leave the charts from 9 or above for 3 weeks running as ‘Time Of The Season’ by The Zombies and ‘My Sentimental Friend’ by Herman’s Hermits had left from number 9 in the 2 preceding weeks. It was just 10 weeks ago that we saw the first of only 2 songs (excluding the songs on the first and last top charts) that would top the charts but spend less than 10 weeks in the top 20. ‘Little Yellow Aeroplane’ now joined Peter Sarstedt’s ‘Where Do You Go To My Lovely’ in this feat.

We welcomed Joe Dolan to our charts for the first time. His ‘Make Me An Island’ would be the first of many SA hits he would have. The song was written by Albert Hammond and Mike Hazelwood and was a second SA hit for the duo. They had also brought us ‘Little Arrows ’the previous hit for Leapy Lee who was busy leaving our charts this week with his second hit. ‘Make Me An Island’ would be the first of 5 UK hits he would have and the only one that would go top 10 there, peaking as it did at 3. In his native Ireland it would go to number 2. The song was the 5th by an Irish act to chart and Ireland joined France in tied 6th place for number of hits by a nation behind The US, The UK, SA, Canada and Australia.

Desmond Dekker enjoyed a second outing in the charts, his second hit to date, ‘It Miek’ arriving at 19 this week. The song title was Jamaican patois for ‘That’s Why’ or could mean ‘that’s what you get’. The song would reach number 7 in the UK for Dekker and like his previous hit, ‘Israelites’, it was written by him (using his real name Desmond Dacres) and Leslie Kong with the latter producing both singles. It would sell over a million copies globally.

The last of the new entries was ‘I’d Rather Go Blind’ by a band called Chicken Shack. One of the band members was a certain Christine Perfect who would later become better known as Fleetwood Mac’s Christine McVie. ‘I’d Rather Go Blind’ was first recorded in 1967 by Etta James and apart from the number 14 peak in the UK by Chicken Shack’s version it also charted there for Ruby Turner in 1987 going to 24 and then again in 1990 when Sydney Youngblood’s version made it to 44. Youngblood’s version is the only one to make the US Hot 100 where it went to 46.

This week we had artist from The US, The UK, South Africa, Canada, Ireland and Jamaica in the top 20. This ‘6 nations in the chart’ equalled the record to date for diversity of hits which we had seen on 4 separate occasions previously. We also saw the UK acts move level again with those from the US as both nations had now provided us with 209 hits each. The 2 hits from Desmond Dekker moved the Jamaicans on to 2 hits and they were tied 8th with acts from Germany.

Percy Sledge enjoyed his 60th week with us. He sat unmoved at 16 on the weeks count list.

The Monkees moved tied 18th on the weeks count list, joining The Tremeloes there on 53 weeks. This meant that Jim Reeves fell off the top 20 of that list.

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