1970 THE FACTS AND FIGURES

chris-andrews_pretty_belinda

That is now the first year of the new decade done and all that is left is to wrap up the year with the usual who managed to do what and how summary.

We had 141 songs spend at least 1 week in the chart during the year. This was down on 1969’s record to date of 153 hits and in fact was the 3rd lowest we had seen to date with only 1965 (which was half a year) and 1966 seeing less songs chart. These 141 songs were brought to us by 114 different artists (duets and collaborations counting as 2, the figure would be 112 if these counted as 1). 1970 saw the lowest hits per act ratio with the 114 acts seeing on average only 1.24 hits each. This compared to the high to date of 1967 which saw the acts averaging 1.49 hits each. The table below sets out the comparative figures for these stats by year:

Year No Of Hits No Of Acts Hits/Acts Ratio
1965 79 55 1.44
1966 136 97 1.40
1967 146 98 1.49
1968 142 97 1.46
1969 153 112 1.37
1970 141 114 1.24

While the overall number of hits was one of the lowest to date, the locals had a good year seeing 28 of their hits chart. This was the second highest total we had seen in a year with only the 30 we saw in 1966 being higher. There were 24 acts who brought us these hits (22 if you don’t split out the duets).

TOP HITS

Based on a points system of 20 points for a number 1 position, 19 for number 2 etc down to 1 for position 20, the following are the top 40 chart performers for the year (Note: this does not reflect sales):

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Pretty Belinda Chris Andrews 268
2 Love Is A Beautiful Song Dave Mills 256
3 In The Summertime Mungo Jerry 236
4 Ma Belle Amie Tee Set 231
5 Carol Ok Chris Andrews 218
6 Come Softly To Me Percy Sledge 215
7 Burning Bridges Mike Curb Congregation 206
8 The Wedding Jody Wayne 205
9 Bridge Over Troubled Water Simon & Garfunkel 186
10 Yellow River Christie 178
11 Spider Spider Tidal Wave 176
12 Cracklin’ Rosie Neil Diamond 173
13 Cha-La-La, I Need You Shuffles 167
=14 Lola Kinks 165
=14 Hitchin’ A Ride Vanity Fare 165
16 Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head B.J. Thomas 164
17 Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes) Edison Lighthouse 162
18 Brown Eyes Chris Andrews 160
=19 Daughter Of Darkness Tom Jones 154
=19 Which Way You Goin’ Billy? Poppy Family 154
=20 Venus Shocking Blue 153
=20 Mademoiselle Ninette Michael Holm 153
23 Working On A Good Thing Outlet 151
24 Without Love Tom Jones 149
25 Neanderthal Man Hotlegs 145
26 Travellin’ Band Creedence Clearwater Revival 143
27 Theresa Dave Mills 142
28 Holly Holy Neil Diamond 137
=29 (Call Me) Number One Tremeloes 135
=29 Tchaikovsky One Omega Limited 135
31 All I Have To Do Is Dream Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell 127
32 Jam Up Jelly Tight Tommy Roe 124
33 Knock Knock Who’s There Mary Hopkin 121
34 Keep On Smiling James Lloyd 117
=35 A Song Of Joy Miguel Rios 116
=35 Cotton Fields (The Cotton Song) Beach Boys 116
37 Looky Looky Giorgio 115
38 All The Tears In The World Dave Mills 110
39 Don’t Cry Daddy Elvis Presley 109
40 I Don’t Believe In If Anymore Roger Whittaker 106

You can compare this to the list published in Top 40 magazine in 1989 which can be found here:

Top 40 Magazine 1970 List

Chris Andrews’ ‘Pretty Belinda’ was the first song by a British act to be the song of the year based on this points system. Before this we had seen 3 local songs take the honour and 2 American acts do so. The 268 points ‘Pretty Belinda’ made was the 4th highest for the top song of the year that we had seen in the 6 years of charts so far and overall it was the 6th highest total a song had managed in a calendar year (it earned an additional 16 points in 1969).

The cumulative points to date gave the following top 10:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Cry To Me Staccatos 342
2 Timothy Four Jacks & A Jill 312
3 Sweet Pea Tommy Roe 307
4 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
5 Master Jack Four Jacks & A Jill 295
6 Green Green Grass Of Home Tom Jones 289
7 California Girls Beach Boys 286
8 Pretty Belinda Chris Andrews 284
=9 Theresa Dave Mills 279
=9 Sunglasses Hilary 279

The top songs pointswise on the local front for 1970 were as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Love Is A Beautiful Song Dave Mills 256
2 The Wedding Jody Wayne 205
3 Spider Spider Tidal Wave 176
4 Working On A Good Thing Outlet 151
5 Theresa Dave Mills 142

And cumulatively from the start of the charts in 1965:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Cry To Me Staccatos 342
2 Timothy Four Jacks & A Jill 312
3 Master Jack Four Jacks & A Jill 295
=4 Sunglasses Hilary 279
=4 Theresa Dave Mills 279

NUMBER OF HITS

There were 3 acts which managed to spend at least 1 week in the chart with 4 different hits during the year and they were Creedence Clearwater Revival, The Archies and Chris Andrews. This was 1 less than the record to date of 5 hits in a year which Englbert Humperdinck, The Bee Gees (twice), The Archies and Percy Sledge had managed.

Overall Tom Jones led the way for total hit count with 15 hits to date. He was followed by Cliff Richard on 13 and The Hollies on 12.

For the local acts it was Dave Mills who had the best year, seeing 3 of his hits spend time in the charts. He was the 4th local act to manage at least 3 in a year with Gene Rockwell and Murray Campbell managing this in 1965 and then Four Jacks & A Jill managed a record to date for a local act of 4 in 1968. Cumulatively Four Jacks & A Jill led the way for the locals with 7 hits to their name. Virginia Lee, The Staccatos, The Bats and Gene Rockwell all sat behind them on 6.

WEEKS ON THE CHARTS

Last year The Archies set a new record for weeks in the charts, clocking up 47 (2 in the chart in the same week counts as 2). This year Chris Andrews went 1 better by managing 48 and was the clear winner, being 10 weeks ahead of second placed Dave Mill who managed 38. Creedence Clearwater Revival on 35 came in 3rd. Last year Creedence had been tied second with The Bee Gees. Being second overall meant that Dave Mills was the top local act. He was a good way ahead of second placed local, Jody Wayne who managed 21. Tidal Wave with 16 were 3rd. Mills’ 38 weeks equalled the record to date for a local act which Four Jacks & A Jill had managed.

Overall it was still Tom Jones who led the way for weeks having clocked up a total of 165 since the charts began. Percy Sledge sat second with 102 and The Troggs were 3rd with 101. Looking at the local acts it was The Staccatos who led the way with 83 followed by Four Jacks & A Jill on 68 and Dave Mills on 48

NUMBER 1’s

So far the best any act had managed was to see 2 songs spend time at number 1 during the year, but 1970 saw Chris Andrews become the first act to have 3 number 1s in a year as ‘Pretty Belinda’, ‘Carol OK’ and ‘Brown Eyes’ all enjoyed time at the top. Andrews was also the only act to have had more than 1 chart topper this year and he set a new record for weeks at 1 in a calendar year as his 3 chart toppers spent a total of 9 weeks there. The next best we had seen in a year was 7.

1970 was the second best year for local number 1s as we saw 3 local songs go to number 1. These were Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’, Tidal Wave’s ‘Spider Spider’ and Jody Wayne’s ‘The Wedding’.

There were 3 songs which shared the honours for most weeks spent at 1 during the year and these were Chris Andrews’ ‘Pretty Belinda’, The Mike Curb Congregations’ ‘Burning Bridges’ and Mungo Jerry’s ‘In The Summertime’ which all spent 5 weeks at the top of the charts. The record to date was 7 weeks at the top which 2 songs had managed in a calendar year (Hilary’s’ Sunglasses’ and The Tremeloes’ ‘Silence Is Golden’) and 1 song had managed in total but straddling a year end (‘Massachusetts’ by The Bee Gees). Of the 3 local songs that topped the charts, Dave Mills’ 4 weeks with ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ took top honours with ‘The Wedding’ by Jody Wayne managing 3 in a broken run. ‘Spider Spider’ only managed 1 week.

Tom Jones still led the way for most chart toppers. He added 1 this year to the 5 he had amassed in previous years to bring his total to 6. Chris Andrews was in second place with 4 to his name and he was followed by The Troggs, The Tremloes, Elvis Presley, The Bee Gees and The Rolling Stones who were all on 3. Four Jacks And A Jill, who had seen 2 chart toppers, were still the only local act to have achieved more than 1.

In terms of weeks spent at number 1, it was unsurprisingly Tom Jones who led the way. He had spent a total of 18 weeks at the top spot. Second highest was The Bee Gees who were on 14 and these top 2 were unchanged from the end of 1969. Third spot did change as Chris Andrews’ 13 weeks at 1 put him ahead of The Troggs and Elvis Presley who were 3rd at the end of 1969. There was no change for the locals with Four Jacks & A Jill and Hillary on 7 weeks still leading the way.

FEMALE ACTS

Last year saw the worst performance by the ladies since 1965, the first year of the charts, with them bringing us only 8 hits (9 if you include their involvement in duets). This year they fared no better, once again seeing 8 hits, a figure which goes up to 9 when duets were added in. Both totals matched that of 1969. The female artists’ best year to date was 1967 when they brought us 23 hits.

The only woman to manage more than 1 hit this year was Bobbie Gentry who did so with 1 solo hit and 1 as part of a duet with Glen Campbell. Petula Clark’s 4 in 1967 was still the best to date. Barbara Ray and Wanda Arletti were the only local ladies to chart.

Petula Clark still led the way for hits to date by woman with 10 to her name. This placed her 6th overall. Virginia Lee and Nancy Sinatra were still in second position with 6 hits each to their names with Virginia leading the way for local lasses. Judy Page on 3 was the second highest local woman.

Only 2 women managed to clock up 10 or more weeks in the year and they were Bobbie Gentry with 12 and Barbara Ray with 10. This was the lowest total for the top woman in a year with the best effort being Petula Clark’s 37 in 1967. Barbara Ray was obviously the top local woman with Wanda Arletti the second local and coming in tied 5th overall for woman with 5 weeks.

To date Petula Clark led the way for women with 71 weeks to her name. Sandie Shaw was second with 54 and Lucille Starr 3rd with 53. This top 3 was unchanged from the end of 1969. Virginia Lee still led the way for local ladies with 36 weeks while Hillary and Carike Keuzenkamp sat tied second with 22 to their names.

This year was the first time we did not see a woman top the charts. 1968 had seen 2 manage it and the best year to date was 1967 when 5 women saw their hits go to number 1. All the other years saw just 1 female chart topper. We were still to see a woman top the charts more than once other than Nancy Sinatra who had managed it once as a solo artist and once as part of a duet with her dad, Frank. Hilary’s 7 weeks at the top of the charts with ‘Sunglasses’ was still the most number of weeks a woman had spent at 1.

The top 5 hits by woman in 1970 based on the points system were:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Knock Knock Who’S There Mary Hopkin 121
2 All Kinds Of Everything Dana 82
3 Zanzibar Wanda Arletti 59
4 Band Of Gold Freda Payne 40
5 Ruby Tuesday Melanie 27

On a cumulative basis, the top 5 was unchanged from last year and read:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
2 Sunglasses Hilary 279
3 Timothy Carike Keuzenkamp 236
4 Cry Softly (Liebestraum) Nancy Ames 232
5 The French Song Lucille Starr 223

NATIONALITIES

Aside from artists from the UK and US (who tend to dominate most charts worldwide), and local acts the following are the top hits from other nationalities:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 Ma Belle Amie Tee Set 231 Netherlands
2 Cha-La-La, I Need You Shuffles 167 Netherlands
3 Which Way You Goin’ Billy? Poppy Family 154 Canada
=4 Venus Shocking Blue 153 Netherlands
=4 Mademoiselle Ninette Michael Holm 153 Germany

The Netherland had 3 of the top 5, a feat that the Australians had managed in 1966 and 1967 while Canada were the only other nation that had managed to take the top 2 on this list before when they did it in 1967. Tee Set’s feat in topping this list was the first time we saw a Dutch act do so. So far the Australians had topped this list twice and the Canadians, French and Irish each had 1 apiece.

1970 saw the highest number of songs by ‘Rest of the World’ artists as they accounted for 19. Their next best was 1969’s 13. There were 19 acts who brought us these 19 songs which meant that none of them had more than 1 hit.

The Americans had the most number of hits in the year for a 4th time as their 48 in 1970 was the highest. They were followed by the British on 46 and the locals on 28. Acts from Jamaica were the highest from the rest of the world with 6 to their name. They were followed by the Dutch (4) and the Canadians (3). Australia, Kenya, Spain and Italy all contributed 1. The 48 by the Americans was the second lowest winning total we had seen to date with 1965’s 36 being the only time the top figure was lower and that was only half a year.

To date we had seen 272 hits from the Americans, 258 from the British, 117 from South Africans, 16 from Canadians and 8 each from Australians and Jamaicans.

The cumulative best hits for ‘rest of the world’ artists was as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 Ma Belle Amie Tee Set 231 Netherlands
2 The French Song Lucille Starr 223 Canada
3 World Of Our Own Seekers 192 Australia
4 Love Is Blue Paul Mauriat Orchestra 186 France
5 Cha-La-La, I Need You Shuffles 167 Netherlands

WHAT DIDN’T CHART

There were 17 songs that topped the US or UK charts (or both) which did not make our charts. This was 1 less than 1969’s record to date of 18, however as 3 of those 18 did eventually chart in 1970, the figure for 1969 of songs UK/US chart toppers that would never make our top 20 was 15 while none of the 17 that did not make it in 1970 would ever make it.

The 17 chart toppers in the US or UK or both that didn’t make our charts were as follows:

Song Artist
Let It Be Beatles
The Long And Winding Road/For You Blue Beatles
Make It With You Bread
(They Long To Be) Close To You Carpenters
Ain’t No Mountain High Enough Diana Ross
War Edwin Starr
Back Home England World Cup Squad
American Woman Guess Who
ABC Jackson 5
I Want You Back Jackson 5
I’ll Be There Jackson 5
The Love You Save Jackson 5
Voodoo Chile Jimi Hendrix
Spirit In The Sky Norman Greenbaum
Everything Is Beautiful Ray Stevens
Thank You (Falettin Me Be Mice Elf Again)/Everybody Is A Star Sly & The Family Stone
The Tears Of A Clown Smokey Robinson & The Miracles

CHARTING IN CONSECUTIVE YEARS

We were down to just 5 acts who had spent at least 1 week in the charts in every year since 1965 and they were Cliff Richard, Herman’s Hermits, The Hollies, The Staccatos and Tom Jones. There were 2 acts who had charted in every year up to 1969 who did not manage to feature in the charts in 1970 and they were Donovan and Manfred Mann.

There had been 5 acts who had seen some chart action in every year from 1966 (the second year of the charts), but not 1 of them would feature in the charts in 1970, in fact only 1 would actually be seen in the top 20 again.

There were 4 acts who had features in every year’s charts from 1967 onwards and they were The Bee Gees, The Box Tops and The Tremeloes.

I WRITE THE SONGS

This year saw the second occasion where the total number of song writers credited on the songs that charted made it into the 200s and 1970 only just managed it as it as there were exactly 200 song writers who brought us the songs of 1970. The record to date was 206 which we saw in 1967.

Terry Dempsey was the one who brought us the most hits this year with 8 songs that he had song writing credits on spending time in the top 20 this year. This equalled the record to date for a calendar year which Barry Mason had set in 1968. Jeff Barry who shared the top spot in 1969 with Barry and Maurice Gibb was second place this year with 6. This was the same total he had when he topped the list in 1969.

Les Reed, who only managed 3 in 1970, still led the way overall with 17 to his name. Barry Mason was in second place with 15 while Geoff Stephens and Barry Gibb shared 3rd place with 13. Dempsey, who had only had 1 hit prior to this year, was sitting tied 10th overall.

Having the most songs chart usually meant that one also topped the most weeks in the chart list as well and this year was no exception as Terry Dempsey’s 8 hits gave him the top total weeks for a song writer in the year as he clocked up 69. This also beat the previous record of 63 for a calendar year which Barry Mason had managed in 1968. Chris Andrews was second in 1970 with 49 weeks to his name as song writer.

Overall Les Reed still led the way for weeks in the chart as he had managed 160. The second and third placed song writers at the end of 1969 swapped places as Barry Mason moved up to second from 3rd, he had 139 weeks to his name while Barry Gibb, who had been second, dropped to 3rd with 125 weeks. Dempsey’s effort in 1970 moved him into 9th place overall.

Chris Andrews’ was the only song writer to see 3 of his compositions go to number 1 and they were the same 3 that he topped the charts with as an artist. The only other song writer to see more than 1 chart topper this year was Terry Demspey who had writing credits on Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ and Tidal Wave’s ‘Spider Spider’. There were now 6 song writers sitting on 4 number 1s to date and they were Les Reed, Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Chris Andrews and Geoff Stephens.

Chris Andrews was the song writer to spend the most weeks at 1 as he managed 9. Terry Dempsey, Ray Dorset and Lalo Schifrin were all second with 5 weeks. Dorset had penned Mungo Jerry’s ‘In The Summertime’ while Schifrin gave us The Mike Curb Congregations’ ‘Burning Bridges’.

There was no change to the top 3 song writers for total weeks spent at number 1 as Barry and Maurice Gibb shared the top spot on 15 weeks with their brother Robin sitting just behind them on 14. Chris Andrews moved up into 4th place with 13.

THANKS

Finally, I would like to thank all those who have helped by noting corrections etc as we have gone through 1970. Special thanks go to Peet van Staaden, Anton van Staaden and Ian McLean for supplying invaluable information and corrections as well as Chris Kimberly, Brian Currin, Stephen Segerman and Tertius Louw for being my go-to guys when I’m stumped.

And so we venture further into the 70s. 1971 up next.

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