16 August 1974

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Sundown  – Gordon Lightfoot
2 6 5 Band on the Run  – Wings
3 3 8 Ma! (He’s Making Eyes at Me)  – Lena Zavaroni
4 2 12 Waterloo  – ABBA
5 10 4 Sugar Baby Love  – Rubettes
6 9 5 Long Legged Woman Dressed in Black  – Mungo Jerry
7 5 10 Tchip Tchip  – Dan Hill
8 7 12 There Won’t be Anymore  – Charlie Rich
9 4 14 The Air That I Breathe  – Hollies
10 18 3 Let Me Roll It  – Wings
11 8 19 Solitaire  – Andy Williams
12 New 1 The Night Chicago Died  – Paper Lace
13 12 5 Joey  – Barbara Ray
14 14 5 Shlick Shlack Boom Boom  – Lee Reed
15 15 4 Heartbeat  – Jody Wayne
16 New 1 Touch too Much  – Arrows
17 11 13 Haai Casanova  – Glenys Lynne
18 19 2 Doctor’s Orders  – Sunny
19 20 2 Over and Over  – George Baker Selection
20 New 1 Apple of My Eye  – Badfinger

‘Sundown’ by Gordon Lightfoot enjoyed a 3rd week at the top of the charts but faced a new challenge as Wings’ ‘Band On The Run’ moved up 4 from 6 to 2 to put real pressure on it. Before this hit, McCartney’s highest peak in a post Beatles world had been 7 which he had managed as a solo artist with ‘Another Day’. He had managed to hit the top spot as a member of The Beatles.

Canadian acts had now spent a total of 7 weeks at the top of the charts (4 with Terry Jacks’ Seasons In The Sun’ and now 3 for Gordon Lightfoot’s hit) and this put them tied 2nd with Germany for weeks at 1 by a non-big 3 nation (i.e. not from SA, the UK or the US). The Netherlands still led the way with 13.

Wings’ ‘Let Me Roll It’ was the climber of the week as it moved up 8 from 18 to 10. This was McCartney’s 4th time with the climber award (as either solo or part of Wings) and this put him level with Ringo for most biggest climbers by an ex-Beatle and it also equalled what The Beatles themselves had managed.

The alert amongst you would have noticed that Wings had 2 star raters this week (as mentioned above, apart from their biggest climber with ‘Let Me Roll It’, ‘Band On The Run’ climbed 4 to 2) and were the 3rd act to manage 2 star raters in the same week this Engelbert Humperdinck and Neil Diamond were the other 2. There would be a further 2 occasions when we would see this.

The Rubette’s ‘Sugar Baby Love’ was the only other hit to climb 4 or more as it moved up 5 from                 10 to 5.

For a 4th week running, a song by a local act was the faller of the week as Glenys Lynne’s ‘Haai Casanova’ took the honours with a 6 place drop from 11 to 17. Gwynneth Ashley-Robin’s ‘Little Soldier Blue’ had taken the award twice in the previous 3 weeks while Peter Vee’s ‘Baby Baby Answer Me (I’m Calling)’ had managed it once to give us the 4 week run. Glenys Lynne had seen the faller of the week 5 times as a member of Four Jacks & A Jill and once as one half of a duet (with Jody Wayne), but this was her first time as a solo act.

Andy Williams’ ‘Solitaire’ was still the oldest on the charts. It had been with us for 19 weeks and had been the oldest for 2.

The other 2 local songs which had formed part of the 4 week run of local fallers of the week, both fell out of the top 20 this week. Gwynneth Ashley-Robin’s ‘Little Soldier Blue’ managed 9 weeks in the charts and peaked at 9. This was the 32nd song and 6th local song to see an equal weeks and peak figure. This heralded the end of the Ashley-Robin’s SA chart career with 2 hits to her name, a total of 23 weeks and a single week at 1 which her other hit, ‘Little Jimmy’ had managed. Sadly Gwynneth would die in a light aircraft crash 2 years and 4 days after her last appearance on our charts. She was only 15 when she died.

Peter Vee’s ‘Baby, Baby Answer Me (I’m Calling)’ managed 6 weeks in the charts and peaked at 12. He would chart again.

Last to go was Hot Chocolate’s ‘Emma’ which spent 11 weeks in the top 20 and peaked at 3. This was the highest peak of their 3 hits to date, but they still had more to come.

The first of the new entries was ‘The Night Chicago Died’ by British band, Paper Lace. The song gave them a number 1 hit in the US, but faltered at 3 in the UK and failed to emulate their previous UK hit, ‘Billy Don’t Be A Hero’ which had managed to get to the top spot. ‘The Night Chicago Died’ gave songwriter Peter Callendar his 10th SA hit and co-writer Mitch Murray his 7th. This was their first hit since Alan Garrity’s ‘Home Isn’t Home Anymore’ which charted back in January 1973.

The next new entry, Arrow’s ‘Touch Too Much’ was a milestone for songwriters Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn as it was their 10th to chart in SA. The song was reputedly turned down by Suzi Quatro, David Cassidy and The Sweet, but gave The Arrows a number 8 hit in the UK. Mickie Most who had spent time living and recording in South Africa, produced this song. This was the first new entry by a US act in 8 weeks and this equalled the second longest gap to date between new entries by American acts.

The last new entry was Badfinger’s 4th SA hit and their first since ‘Baby Blue’ departed from the charts in August 1972, a gap of 104 weeks. This was the 59th time we had seen a gap of 100 weeks or more between hits by an artist. ‘Apple Of My Eye’ was the last non-ex-Beatle song to be released on the Fab Four’s Apple record label before it collapsed. The song failed to chart in the UK and only managed to scrape a peak of 102 in the US.

After 14 weeks of being in second place, the Brits regained the top spot for total weeks on the chart. They now had 3,309 to their name, 1 more than the Yanks who were on 3,308.

Jody Wayne hit the 60 week milestone but this failed to move him up the local weeks count list. He was still 8th and 3 weeks behind 7th placed John Edmond wo was on 63.

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