15 July 1977

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 4 6 Hush Hush Maria  – Joe Dolan
2 3 7 My Broken Souvenirs  – Pussycat
3 8 4 (Walkin’ on a) Love Cloud  – 5000 Volts
4 1 12 Yesterday’s Hero  – John Paul Young
5 2 9 Knowing Me, Knowing You  – ABBA
6 7 3 Magic Flight (Aka Magic Fly)  – Space
7 11 2 Red Light Spells Danger  – Billy Ocean
8 9 4 Crossfire  – Bellamy Brothers
9 5 6 Spring Rain (Part 1) (Lluvia De Primavera)  – Bebu Silvetti
10 13 5 They Shoot Horses Don’t They?  – Racing Cars
11 6 11 Slow Down  – Shabby Tiger
12 10 5 I Like Dreamin’  – Kenny Nolan
13 17 2 Lucille  – Kenny Rogers
14 16 2 More Than a Lover  – Bonnie Tyler
15 18 7 Stone Walls  – Dennis East
16 12 15 Don’t Cry for Me Argentina  – Julie Covington
17 15 13 When I Need You  – Leo Sayer
18 New 1 Gimme Dat Banana  – Strobe
19 14 8 Make Her an Angel  – Roy Bulkin
20 New 1 Yes Sir, I Can Boogie  – Baccara

This week we saw the 200th different song top the charts as Joe Dolan’s ‘Hush Hush Maria’ took over the number 1 spot from John Paul Young’s ‘Yesterday’s Hero’ The latter had been at 1 for 2 weeks. This was the 7th time an act from the non-big 3 nations had taken over the top spot from another such act and with Abba’s ‘Knowing Me, Knowing You’ being the chart topper before ‘Yesterday’s Hero’ we saw the 2nd time where we had 3 number 1s in a row by acts not from SA, the US or the UK. Abba had also been the act on the first of the previous run of 3 when their ‘Dancing Queen’ was followed by Pussycat’s (from The Netherlands) ‘Mississippi’ and then immediately by Aussie band Sherbet’s ‘Howzat’.  ‘Hush Hush Maria’ was Dolan’s second chart topper (his previous being ‘Lady In Blue’) and he was the only Irish act so far to make it to number 1.

5000 Volts picked up their 4th biggest climber of the week as ‘(Walkin’ on a) Love Cloud’ moved up 5 from 8 to 3 to take the award. The other star raters were Billy Ocean’s ‘Red Light (Spells Danger)’ which climbed 4 from 11 to 7 and Kenny Rogers’ ‘Lucille’ which moved up 4 from 17 to 13.

We had 2 fallers of the week and if we assume that the first of these was the one that landed at the lower place in the charts, then it would have been Roy Bulkin’s ‘Make Her An Angel’ which had the honour of being the 900th song to see a biggest faller. It fell 5 from 14 to 19. If you prefer to count your biggest climbers from the top position down, then it would be Shabby Tiger’s ‘Slow Down’ that was the 900th faller of the week. It dropped 5 from 6 to 11.

Julie Covington’s ‘Don’t Cry For Me Argentina’ was the oldest on the charts. It had been so for 3 weeks now and had accumulated a total of 15 weeks.

The Sweet’s illustrious SA chart career came to an end this week with the departure of ‘Fever Of Love’ from the top 20. They had scored 9 top 20 hits, spent 115 weeks in the charts and currently sat tied 8th with The Troggs on the weeks count list, having peaked at 7 on that list. They had seen 3 songs top the charts (Funny Funny’ ‘Co-Co’ and ‘Fox on The Run’) and they would be the only act who would ever take over the top spot from themselves as ‘Co-Co’ had dislodged ‘Funny Funny’ from number 1. They also currently sat at the top of the list of weeks at 1 having managed 19 there. This total would be the tied 3rd highest overall by the time the charts ended.

We also bid farewell to Mary MacGregor’s ‘Torn Between Two Lovers’ which lasted 9 weeks and peaked at 6. This would be her only SA chart hit.

The first of the new entries was by a local band called Strobe with their cover of ‘Gimme Dat Banana’. The song was originally a minor hit in the UK for Black Gorilla where it made number 29 and also made 20 in Sweden. Another version by Alston Koch & Dark Tan made 72 in Australia in 1979. Interestingly, Black Gorilla’s version would only enter the UK charts on 27 August 1977, a month and a week after Strobe made our charts. I have been unable to find any information about the group Strobe, but the song was released on David Gresham’s Nitty Gritty label and produced by Gresham himself.

Our second new entry was the third by a Spanish artist to chart. Baccara’s ‘Yes Sir, I Can Boogie’ followed Miguel Rios’ 1970 hit ‘A Song Of Joy’ and Los Bravos’ ‘Black Is Black’ in flying the Spanish flag in our charts. ‘Yes Sir, I Can Boogie’ topped the charts in The UK, Germany, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Switzerland, Holland, Belgium, Sweden and Norway and fell just short of topping the charts in their native Spain and Austria where it peaked at 2. In New Zealand it managed to get to 33 and 30 in Italy. Baccara consisted of Mayte Mateos (born 7 February 1951, Logroño) and María Mendiola (born 4 April 1952, Madrid) and this, their first single, would go on to sell approximately 16 million copies worldwide, making it the 8th biggest selling single of all time. It had been 353 weeks since Miguel Rios had graced our charts and this was a new record to date gap between hits by acts from a nation. It took over the lead from Argentina who had seen 303 weeks between hits and the song which broke the Argentinian drought, Bebu Silvetti’s ‘Spring Rain (Part 1) (Lluvia De Primavera)’ sat at 9 this week.

Baccara helped to set a record to date 10 different nations represented in the charts. This week’s top 20 was made up of 7 songs by acts from the UK, 3 each from the US and SA and 1 apiece from Argentina, Australia, France, Ireland, The Netherlands, Sweden and Spain.

Abba celebrated reaching 120 weeks in the chart. Reaching this landmark was not enough to move them up the weeks count list as they sat 5th and were 5 behind The Bee Gees and Elvis who sat tied just above them. The Bellamy Brothers meanwhile reached the 20 week mark.

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