1969 THE FACTS AND FIGURES

staccatos_cry_to_me

So, that’s 1969 done and almost dusted. We just need to sum up the year and tell you who were the movers and shakers back then.

There were 153 songs that graced our charts in 1969, this included 19 songs whose chart run straddled the 1968 year end into 1969 and 2 that had a chart run in earlier years and then re-entered the charts in 1969. These songs were brought to us by 112 different acts (110 if you count collaborations as 1 act). The number of songs and acts charting in 1969 was a new record high, beating the previous record of 146 songs and 98 acts we saw in 1967. So far we had seen the following number of hits each year:

Year No Of Hits
1965 79
1966 136
1967 146
1968 142
1969 153

The number of local hits that graced our charts this year continued the trend of decreasing since the record to date 30 in 1966, as this year we saw just 14 songs by South African artists reach the top 20. 12 different acts brought us these 14 hits this year.

TOP HITS

Based on a points system of 20 points for a number 1 position, 19 for number 2 etc down to 1 for position 20, the following are the top 40 chart performers for the year (Note: this does not reflect sales):

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Cry To Me Staccatos 342
2 Sugar, Sugar Archies 272
3 Time Is Tight Booker T & The Mg’s 222
4 Don’t Forget To Remember Bee Gees 209
5 Indian Giver 1910 Fruitgum Company 203
6 Bad Moon Rising Creedence Clearwater Revival 194
7 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down Archies 192
8 Suspicious Minds Elvis Presley 190
9 Crimson & Clover Tommy James & The Shondells 189
10 Proud Mary Creedence Clearwater Revival 188
11 My Sentimental Friend Herman’s Hermits 173
11 Dizzy Tommy Roe 173
11 Put A Little Love In Your Heart Jackie Deshannon 173
14 Hair Cowsills 170
15 Only One Woman Marbles 167
16 Saved By The Bell Robin Gibb 159
17 Turn Around Ken J. Larkin 156
17 You Can Cry If You Want To Troggs 156
19 Games People Play Joe South 150
20 Time Of The Season Zombies 149
21 I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch) Johnny Rivers 146
22 First Of May Bee Gees 142
22 Sorry Suzanne Hollies 142
24 Soul Deep Box Tops 139
25 What Am I Living For Percy Sledge 137
25 Theresa Dave Mills 137
27 Atlantis Donovan 136
28 The Boxer Simon & Garfunkel 131
29 Make Me An Island Joe Dolan 129
30 Little Yellow Aeroplane Leapy Lee 128
31 Bang-Shang-A-Lang Archies 127
32 I Started A Joke Bee Gees 124
33 Where Do You Go To My Lovely Peter Sarstedt 121
34 Something’s Happening Herman’s Hermits 113
35 I’M A Tiger Lulu 107
35 Eloise Barry Ryan 107
37 Conversations Cilla Black 106
38 Build Me Up Buttercup Foundations 104
39 I’ll Never Fall In Love Again Bobbie Gentry 103
39 Baby Make It Soon Marmalade 103
39 Special Delivery 1910 Fruitgum Company 103

You can compare this to the list published in Top 40 magazine in 1989 which can be found here:

Top 40 Magazine 1969 List

‘Cry To Me’ by The Staccatos was the 3rd local song to be the top hit of the year and followed the 1965 success of Murray Campbell’s ‘Goodbye My Love’ and 1968’s ‘Master Jack’ by Four Jacks & A Jill. It also held the record to date for most points in a calendar year, clocking up 342 in 1969. The next highest was Sandy Posey’s 302 with ‘Single Girl’ in 1967.

The cumulative points to date gave the following top 10:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Cry To Me Staccatos 342
2 Timothy Four Jacks & A Jill 312
3 Sweet Pea Tommy Roe 307
4 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
5 Master Jack Four Jacks & A Jill 295
6 Green Green Grass Of Home Tom Jones 289
7 California Girls Beach Boys 286
8 Sunglasses Hilary 279
9 Massachusetts Bee Gees 278
10 Sugar, Sugar Archies 272

The top songs pointswise on the local front for 1969 were as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Cry To Me Staccatos 342
2 Turn Around Ken J. Larkin 156
3 Theresa Dave Mills 137
4 Who’s That Girl The Bats 99
5 Young Love Can Hurt Dickie Loader 65

And cumulatively from the start of the charts in 1965:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Cry To Me Staccatos 342
2 Timothy Four Jacks & A Jill 312
3 Master Jack Four Jacks & A Jill 295
4 Sunglasses Hilary 279
5 Ramblin’ Boy Des Lindberg 251

NUMBER OF HITS

In 1968 The Bee Gees and Engelbert Humperdinck set a new record of 5 hits spending at least 1 week in the charts in a year. This year The Bee Gees repeated this feat and were joined by Percy Sledge and The Archies who also managed it.  Tom Jones, who was the leader overall for hit count at the end of 1968, still led the way, but shared top spot for this with Cliff Richard as both acts sat on 12 hits. The Hollies on 11 and Herman’s Hermits and the Bees Gees on 10 were next on the list.

On the local front it was The Staccatos, Quentin E. Klopjaeger and Ken J. Larkins who saw 2 hits each spend time in the charts. No local act managed more than 2. Four Jacks & A Jill led the way on the cumulative front, having managed 7. Virginia Lee, The Staccatos and Gene Rockwell on 6 were all next.

WEEKS ON THE CHARTS

The Archies beat the record to date for weeks in the charts as their 47 was 4 more than the previous best which The Bee Gees had managed in 1968 (2 hits in the chart in the same week count as 2). The Bee Gees had to be satisfied with tied 2nd place for weeks this year. They clocked up 39 which Creedence Clearwater Revival also managed.  In 4th place, and the top local act, was The Staccatos with 32. Ken J. Larkin was the second highest local act with 17 (tied 12th overall) with Quentin E. Klopjaeger coming 3rd on 11 weeks (tied 26th overall). The best in a year to date for the local acts was the 38 Four Jacks & A Jill managed in 1968.

Tom Jones still led the way for cumulative weeks to date. He had accumulated 135 so far. Next highest were The Troggs on 101 followed by The Bee Gees on 87.

The Staccatos led the way for local acts with 71 to their name. They were followed by Four Jacks & A Jill on 68 then The Bats on 42.

NUMBER 1’s

Creedence Clearwater Revival were the only act to manage more than 1 chart topper in the year. Their hits ‘Proud Mary’ and ‘Bad Moon Rising’ both made it to 1 in 1969. So far we had still not seen an act have more than 2 number 1s in a year.

After last year’s record 5 local chart toppers, 1969 was a bit of a come down as it was only The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ that made the coveted number 1 spot on our charts.

Elvis Presley’s ‘Suspicious Minds’ was the song which occupied the number 1 spot for the most number of weeks this year, spending 6 weeks there in a broken run of 3 and 3 weeks. The 7 weeks that The Tremeleos’ ‘Silence Is Golden’, The Bee Gees’ ‘Massachusetts’ and Hilary’s ‘Sunglasses’ remained the record to date for weeks at 1 with Hilary’s hit obviously also being the record for a local song.

Tom Jones had the most chart toppers to date as he had seen 5 of his hits make the number 1 spot. Elvis Presley, The Troggs, The Bee Gees and The Rolling Stones were all second with 3 number 1s to their respective names while Four Jacks & A Jill were the only local group to have had more than 1 having had 2.

Tom Jones also led the way for weeks spent at 1 in total, although his 15 so far was under threat from The Bee Gees who had enjoyed 14 with just 3 chart topers. Four Jacks & A Jill and Hilary led the way for local acts with 7 each to their names.

FEMALE ACTS

As with the local acts, the ladies had a bad time of it in 1969 with just 8 hits by solo female artists charting (9 if you include the mother & daughter collaboration from Judy Page Ft Kimbo). This was less than half the number we saw in 1968 and nearly a third of their best performance to date of 23 in 1967. 7 acts brought us the 8 hits with Sandie Shaw being the only woman to have 2 hits chart in the year. This was half the best performance to date by a woman, the 4 hits Petula Clark managed in 1967. Jill Kirkland was the only local lady to chart with a solo hit, ‘Katrina’s Theme’ being her hit this year while the collaboration of Judy Page Ft Kimbo added to the local lady count.

Petula Clark still led the way overall for women with 9 hits to her name. This was the tied 6th highest by any act so far. Virginia Lee was the highest local woman with 6 hits to her name and she sat tied second for women with Nancy Sinatra. Judy Page with 3, was the second highest local lass.

Sandie Shaw’s 16 week in total in the charts in 1969 meant she was the highest ranked woman for the year for weeks count. Jackie De Shannon with 12 was second. Jill Kirkland’s 6 just beat Judy Page and daughter Kimbo who scored 5 weeks with their collaborative hit.

Petula Clark, who did not feature in the charts in 1969, still led the way for total weeks to date on the chart as she had 68. Sandie Shaw was second on 54 with Lucille Starr in 3rd place on 53. Virginia Lee was in 5th place overall for woman and was the highest placed local female with Carike Keuzenkamp on 22 weeks coming in second for the locals.

Despite the low turnout for hits by women, they did manage 1 chart topper in the form of Jackie DeShannon’s ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’. We were yet to see a woman top the chart twice as a solo artist although Nancy Sinatra had managed it once as a solo artist and once as part of a duet with her dad, Frank. Hilary’s 7 weeks at the top of the charts with ‘Sunglasses’ was still the most number of weeks a woman had spent at 1.

The top 5 hits by woman in 1969 based on the points system were:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Put A Little Love In Your Heart Jackie Deshannon 173
2 I’m A Tiger Lulu 107
3 Conversations Cilla Black 106
4 I’ll Never Fall In Love Again Bobbie Gentry 103
5 Monsieur DuPont Sandie Shaw 92

On a cumulative basis, the top 5 was unchanged from last year and read:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
2 Sunglasses Hilary 279
3 Timothy Carike Keuzenkamp 236
4 Cry Softly (Liebestraum) Nancy Ames 232
5 The French Song Lucille Starr 223

NATIONALITIES

Aside from artists from the UK and US (who tend to dominate most charts worldwide), and local acts the following are the top hits from other nationalities:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 Make Me An Island Joe Dolan 129 Ireland
2 Chewy Chewy Tonics 57 Germany
3 So Good Together Andy Kim 50 Canada
4 Israelites Desmond Dekker 48 Jamaica
5 Quick Joey Small (Run Joey Run) Real McCoy 46 Ireland

There was a record to date 13 songs by artists not from The US, The UK and SA which spent at least a week in the charts this year. For a 3rd year running, the Canadians had the highest amount of hits with 6 of the 13 being by Canadian artists. It should be mentioned that in 1967, they shared top spot for hits count with the Australians. We saw 3 songs by Irish acts, 2 by Jamaican acts and 1 apiece for the German and Dutch acts. So far only 2 songs by acts from outside The UK, The US and SA had topped the charts and this number was not added to in 1969.

The Americans far outstripped the British for hits this year as they clocked up record to date of 72 for a nation compared to the Poms’ 54. The Yanks now led 3 years to 2 for taking the most in a year as they had done so in 66 and 67 with the Poms taking the honours in 65 and 68.

The cumulative best hits for ‘rest of the world’ artists was unchanged from the end of 1969 and read as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 The French Song Lucille Starr 223 Canada
2 World Of Our Own Seekers 192 Australia
3 Love Is Blue Paul Mauriat Orchestra 186 France
4 The Carnival Is Over Seekers 160 Australia
5 I Love You Lucille Starr 148 Canada

WHAT DIDN’T CHART

This year, a record to date 18 songs would top the either The UK or US charts or both, but would not make out top 20. Of these 18, there would be 3 that would make our top 20 in 1970. The remaining 15 that would never see SA chart action was still the highest to date we had seen with the 14 in 1968 that would never make our charts being the next highest. It should also be noted that while the Jane Birkin & Serge Gainsbourg version of ‘Je T’Aime… Moi Non Plus’ would not chart in SA, we did see the instrumental version by Sounds Nice reach number 8 in 1969.

The 18 chart toppers in the US or UK or both that didn’t make our charts were as follows:

Song Artist
Wedding Bell Blues 5Th Dimension
(If Paradise Is) Half As Nice Amen Corner
Come Together/Something Beatles
Get Back Beatles
The Ballad Of John And Yoko Beatles
Albatross Fleetwood Mac
Je T’Aime… Moi Non Plus** Jane Birkin And Serge Gainsbourg
Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da Marmalade
Blackberry Way Move
Leaving On A Jet Plane Peter, Paul & Mary
Two Little Boys* Rolf Harris
Honky Tonk Women Rolling Stones
Everyday People Sly & The Family Stone
Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye* Steam
Someday We’ll Be Together* Supremes
I Can’t Get Next To You Temptations
Something In The Air Thunderclap Newman
In The Year 2525 Zager & Evans

* Would chart in 1970

** Sounds Nice’s instrumental version of the song charted in 1969

CHARTING IN CONSECUTIVE YEARS

There were 7 acts that had spent at least 1 week in the charts in every year since the charts started in 1965 and they were Cliff Richard, Donovan, Herman’s Hermits, The Hollies, Manfred Mann, The Staccatos and Tom Jones. The 4 acts who had seen chart action every year to 1968 but failed to chart in 1969 were The Beach Boys, The Kinks, Petula Clark and The Rolling Stones. 3 of these 4 would chart in 1970.

There were 5 acts who had charted every year since 1966 and these were The Grass Roots, The Monkees, Tommy James & The Shondells, The Troggs and The Turtles while 8 acts had charted every year since 1967 (Sandie Shaw, The Bee Gees, The Box Tops, The Doors, Engelbert Humperdinck, The Foundations, Percy Sledge and The Tremeloes).

I WRITE THE SONGS

We saw 193 different song writers’ names on the hits that made the charts this year. This was the lowest total we had seen since 1966 where there were 163 song writers involved in bringing us the hits of that year. There were 3 song writers who managed 6 hits in the year and they were Jeff Barry, Barry Gibb and Maurice Gibb. The other Gibb brother, Robin, had to be satisfied with the second highest amount as he clocked up 5 and was joined by Tony Macauley in that total. Les Reed led the way overall with 15 hits to date featuring his name in the song writing credits. He was followed by Barry Mason and Barry Gibb who were on 13, then came Robin Gibb on 11.

Songs written or co-written by Jeff Barry spent more weeks in the charts than those by any other song writer as he clocked up 52 weeks which was the second highest total in a year to date, beaten only by Barry Mason’s 63 in 1968.

Les Reed still led the way overall, having seen his hits spend a total of 142 weeks on the charts. Barry Gibb was second with 124 weeks to his name and another Barry, Barry Mason was in 3rd place with 123.

The 3 Gibb brothers (Barry, Maurice & Robin) were joined by Geoff Stephens and John Fogerty in seeing 2 hits they wrote top the charts.  The Causals’ ‘Jesamine’ was 1 of the 2 chart toppers for all 3 Gibb bothers while Maurice and Barry scored another one with The Bee Gees’ ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ and Robin scored his second with his solo hit, ‘Saved By The Bell’. Geoff Stephens saw The Hollies’ ‘Sorry Suzanne’ and Herman’s Hermits’ ‘My Sentimental Friend’ make it to number 1 for him while John Fogerty took song writing credits on Creedence Clearwater Revival’s 2 number 1s, ‘Proud Mary’ and ‘Bad Moon Rising’.

Geoff Stephens led the way for weeks at 1 during the year, his 2 hits getting him 6 weeks at the top of the charts. He was joined by Mark James who penned Elvis’ hit, ‘Suspicious Minds’ which spent 6 weeks at 1. Overall it was Barry and Maurice Gibb who led the way, having had their compositions spend a total of 15 weeks at 1 since the charts started. They were followed by their brother Robin on 14 with The Troggs’ Reg Presley being next on 10.

THANKS

Finally, I would like to thank all those who have helped by noting corrections etc as we have gone through 1968. Special thanks go to Peet van Staaden and Ian McLean for supplying invaluable information.

And so on to into the 70s we go.

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26 December 1969

suspicious_minds_elvis2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 11 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
2 2 7 He ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother  – Hollies
3 8 4 (Call Me) Number One  – Tremeloes
4 3 10 Theresa  – Dave Mills
5 5 4 Down on the Corner  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
6 4 12 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
7 9 26 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
8 6 13 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
9 11 4 Tracy  – Cuff Links
10 16 2 Pretty Belinda  – Chris Andrews
11 12 4 Jam Up Jelly Tight  – Tommy Roe
12 7 5 So Good Together  – Andy Kim
13 10 9 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Bobbie Gentry
14 19 2 Silent Night  – Percy Sledge
15 14 9 Love at First Sight  – Sounds Nice
16 13 10 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
17 18 3 Does Anybody Miss Me  – Ken J. Larkin
18 20 2 Nursery Rhyme  – Archies
19 15 8 I’m Gonna Make You Mine  – Lou Christie
20 New 1 Baby it’s You  – Smith

Elvis Presley’s ‘Suspicious Minds’ entered its 3rd consecutive week at the top of the charts and this, added to the song’s previous 3 week run at 1, brought the total for the song to 6. It joined 4 other songs to reach 6 weeks and they all sat behind 3 songs which had managed 7 weeks at 1. The Hollies’ ‘He Ain’t Heavy He’s My Brother’ sat patiently at 2 for a second week running.

Chris Andrews’ ‘Pretty Belinda’ was the climber of the week, moving up 6 places from 16 to 10. This was his 2nd time having a biggest climber as an artist and he had also seen 3 biggest climbs with the Sandie Shaw songs that he penned.

Percy Sledge picked up a 12th star rater with ‘Silent Night’ moving up 5 from 19 to 14. He was the 7th act to reach this many star raters and would have sat tied on this amount with, amongst others, The Tremeloes’ except that the latter also picked a star rater with ‘(Call Me) Number One’ which moved up 5 from 8 to 3. They were the 5th act to reach 13 star raters.

Andy Kim’s ‘So Good Together’ was the faller of the week, dropping 5 from 7 to 12. This was the 6th time a song by a Canadian act had been the biggest faller with the first 2 times of those 6 being when Steve Karliski had suffered that fate as part of a duet with American, Mimi Roman.

The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me was into its 14th week in this run and its 26th week overall and was enjoying its 4th week as the oldest during this run. In total The Staccatos had spent 8 weeks with the oldest on the charts, the aforementioned 4 weeks, 3 weeks with ‘Cry To Me’ during its previous run and 1 week with ‘Come Back Silly Girl’.

And talking of second runs on the charts, Rick Nelson’s ‘I Need You’ ended its 2nd run in the top 20. It did not fare nearly as well as ‘Cry To Me’ on its second run as ‘I Need You’ lasted just 3 weeks this time around. It peaked at 17 in those 3 weeks. Overall it had spent 20 weeks in the top 20 and was number 1 for the first 2 weeks that the charts were in existence. Despite being 1 of only 6 songs so far to reach 20 weeks in the charts, the song only sat 28th overall for points with 216 to its name. The good news for Rick was that he would see further chart action in SA.

The newcomer was a band called Smith with their hit ‘Baby It’s You’. The group were discovered by Del Shannon (he of ‘Runaway’ fame) and it is his arrangement of ‘Baby It’s You’ that they recorded. The song, written by Barney Williams, Burt Bacharach and Mack David (Hal’s older brother), was recorded by The Beatles and The Shirelles who got to 67 and 8 respectively on the US Charts with their versions, but were outdone by Smith whose cover made it to number 5 there. The Smith version would not chart in the UK but The Beatles one went to number 7 there and Dave Berry took a cover to 24. Quentin Tarantino used Smith’s version in the soundtrack to his 2007 film ‘Death Proof’.

The Hollies drew level with The Beach Boys on 88 weeks in the charts and the 2 acts sat tied 6th on the week’s count list. Both Tommy Roe and The Staccatos increased their weeks count, their 71 to date leaving them unmoved at 10th on the weeks count list, but they no longer shared the position with Donovan who dropped to 12th. Elvis Took 19th place to himself as his 55 weeks moved him 1 ahead of The Monkees and Sandie Shaw, the latter 2 dropping to tied 20th on the list. On the local front, Ken J. Larkin moved on to 16 weeks and was now tied 14th with Al Debbo and The Dream Merchants.

On the points front both The Archies and The Staccatos moved past the 700 mark. They sat 14th and 15th respectively on the overall points list and The Staccatos were second overall for local acts, sitting behind Four Jacks & A Jill who led the way on 837 points. Creedence Clearwater Revival became the 28th act to pass the 500 points mark.

There were 5 acts on this, the last chart of the year, that had also featured in the first chart of 1969 and they were The Archies, The Bee Gees, Elvis Presley, Percy Sledge and The Tremeloes. This was the second time The Tremeloes and The Bee Gees had appeared on the first and last chart of a year, both acts also doing this in 1968. Tom Jones led the way for this feat, having managed it three times. Having 5 acts do this equalled the best to date as we had seen 5 acts appear on the first and last chart of 1968 and 5 on the very first chart (midway through the year) and last chart of 1965.

Youtube playlist:

19 December 1969

suspicious_minds_elvis2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 10 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
2 4 6 He ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother  – Hollies
3 2 9 Theresa  – Dave Mills
4 3 11 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
5 10 3 Down on the Corner  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
6 5 12 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
7 7 4 So Good Together  – Andy Kim
8 14 3 (Call Me) Number One  – Tremeloes
9 8 25 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
10 6 8 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Bobbie Gentry
11 13 3 Tracy  – Cuff Links
12 18 3 Jam Up Jelly Tight  – Tommy Roe
13 9 9 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
14 16 8 Love at First Sight  – Sounds Nice
15 11 7 I’m Gonna Make You Mine  – Lou Christie
16 New 1 Pretty Belinda  – Chris Andrews
17 19 20 I Need You  – Rick Nelson
18 20 2 Does Anybody Miss Me  – Ken J. Larkin
19 New 1 Silent Night  – Percy Sledge
20 New 1 Nursery Rhyme  – Archies

Having regained the top spot last week, Elvis’ ‘Suspicious Minds’ held on to it for a second week in this, its second run at number 1. It had now enjoyed a total of 5 weeks at 1 which exceeded the combined total of 4 weeks managed by his other 2 chart toppers to date, ‘Do The Clam’ and ‘Crying In The Chapel’.

The Tremeloes’ ‘(Call Me) Number One’ followed up last week’s biggest climber award with another 6 place climb to take the award again. It was their 7th time with a biggest climber and they were only the 6th act to reach this total. Over the life of the charts (1965 to 1989) a total of 35 acts would achieve this many biggest climbers of which 23 would have their 7th one in the top 30 era. The Tremeloes shared the biggest climber award with Tommy Roe and his ‘Jam Up Jelly Tight’ which moved up its 6 places from 18 to 12.

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Down On The Corner’ climbed 5 to 5 to be the only other star rater this week. This was their 7th star rater and they were the 24th act to reach this many star raters. It had taken them just 29 weeks from their first new entry to get this many star raters which meant they averaged one just over every 4 weeks. They equalled The Rolling Stones for the quickest to get to 7 star raters. The next quickest was Engelbert Humperdinck who took 42 weeks from the date his first hit entered the chart till he hit 7 star raters.

It took just a 4 place fall to be the biggest faller this week and there were 3 songs that managed this – Bobbie Gentry’s ‘I’ll Never Fall In Love Again’, The Bats’ ‘Who’s That Girl’ and Lou Christies ‘I’m Gonna Make You Mine’ which fell to 10, 13 and 15 respectively.

The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ clocked up its 25th week with us, having managed 12 in its first run and 13 so far in its second run. This was a new record to date for total weeks in the charts by a song, moving 1 ahead of Tommy Roe’s ‘Sweet Pea’ although it should be said that the latter’s total was in consecutive weeks. ‘Cry To Me’ was the oldest on this week’s chart, even if one excluded the 12 weeks of its previous run. Also clocking up the weeks was Rick Nelson’s ‘I Need You’ which was in its second run on the charts and this week it became the 6th song to reach the 20 weeks in the chart mark.

Bobby Sherman’s ‘Little Woman’ was the 1st of 3 songs to leave the chart this week. It had been with us for 4 weeks and peaked at 13 during that time. This would be Sherman’s only SA chart hit. In the US he would manage 10 top 100 hits, 4 of which would go top 10 there.

Percy Sledge’s ‘Faithful And True’ departed after 6 weeks and peaked at 12. This was tied 2nd lowest weeks for any of Percy’s 7 hits to date and the 3rd lowest peak.

Last to go was The Youngblood’s ‘Get Together’. It spent 5 weeks on the charts and peaked at 10. This would be the sum total of their SA chart career. On an alphabetical list of the artists who had charted so far, The Youngbloods sat second last with The Zombies bring up the last spot. By the time the charts had finished, they would sit 5th last (using surnames for individuals).

The artist on the first new entry set a new record for the gap between hits for a UK act. We had last seen Chris Andrews on the charts as an artist (he had charted as song writer on some of Sandie Shaw’s hits in between) on 13 May 1966. The gap of 188 week beat the previous biggest gap for a UK artists (which was at 1 point the overall biggest gap) that The Animals had by 29 weeks. The 188 weeks was the second biggest gap overall that we had seen to date with Rick Nelson’s 218 weeks being the biggest so far. Andrews’ new one was ‘Pretty Belinda’. The song, his 3rd SA chart hit as an artist, would give him a number 1 hit in Austria and Zimbabwe, go to number 3 in Germany and Norway and 8 in Holland.

Percy Sledge’s 8th SA hit was a seasonal one, ‘Silent Night’ which entered the charts at 19 this week. This well-known Christmas Carol dates back to 1818 and was originally written in German as ‘Stille Nacht, Heilige Nacht’. Bing Crosby’s version of this is the 3rd biggest single of all time worldwide (Crosby also has the all-time top selling single in ‘White Christmas’) shifting around 30 million copies. Sledge joined 5 other acts on 8 hits and they all sat tied 8th for number of hits. This was the 10th occasion where an artist had a new entry the same week that one of their songs left the charts. Of the previous 9 occasions this had happened, 2 had been by Cliff Richard and he was the only act to manage this twice.

The Archies became the 12th act to have 2 different pairings of songs in the charts. They had previously seen ‘La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down’ and ‘Sugar Sugar’ in the charts at the same time and this week their 5th hit to date, ‘Nursery Rhyme’ joined ‘La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down’ which was still in the top 20. Like the song already in the charts, ‘Nursery Rhyme’ was also written by Andy Kim and Jeff Barry giving the former his 5th hit as a song writer and the later his 9th. Barry now sat tied 5 for hits by a song writer. ‘Nursery Rhyme’ did not make the charts in the US or the UK and also didn’t seem to bother the major charts in Europe.

We had 4 acts reach milestones in terms of weeks with Rick Nelson getting to 20, The Archies reaching 50 and The Staccatos and Tommy Roe both reaching 70.

The Staccatos and Tommy Roe moved into tied 10th spot on the weeks count list where they joined Donovan. Percy Sledge moved 1 ahead of The Seekers and now had position 16 to himself while Elvis re-entered the top 20 of the weeks count list, his 54 to date putting him tied 19th with The Monkees and Sandie Shaw. It had been 149 weeks since Elvis was last in the top 20 of this list.

On the local hits count list, Ken J. Larkin moved into tied 16th place with Peter Lotis with both acts on 16 weeks.

The Hollies became the 6th act to reach the 1,000 points mark, their 1,001 to date placing them 6th overall while The Tremloes enjoyed going past the 700 mark. They sat on 704 points which placed them 13th overall.

Youtube playlist:

12 December 1969

suspicious_minds_elvis2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 9 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
2 3 8 Theresa  – Dave Mills
3 1 10 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
4 6 5 He ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother  – Hollies
5 5 11 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
6 4 7 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Bobbie Gentry
7 11 3 So Good Together  – Andy Kim
8 8 24 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
9 9 8 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
10 16 2 Down on the Corner  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
11 7 6 I’m Gonna Make You Mine  – Lou Christie
12 10 5 Get Together  – Youngbloods
13 17 2 Tracy  – Cuff Links
14 20 2 (Call Me) Number One  – Tremeloes
15 12 6 Faithful and True  – Percy Sledge
16 15 7 Love at First Sight  – Sounds Nice
17 13 4 Little Woman  – Bobby Sherman
18 19 2 Jam Up Jelly Tight  – Tommy Roe
19 18 19 I Need You  – Rick Nelson
20 New 1 Does Anybody Miss Me  – Ken J. Larkin

Elvis recaptured the top spot from The Bee Gees’ ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ after the latter had only been there for 1 week for its second run. This was the 3rd time now that we had seen 2 songs knock each other off the top spot twice as the last 8 weeks of number 1s had been ‘Don’t For Get To Remember’ for 3 weeks, then ‘Suspicious Minds’ for 3 weeks, the ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ for 1 week and now ‘Suspicious Minds’ for 1 week. The previous 2 pairs of songs that swapped places at the top like this were Four Jacks & A Jill’s ‘Master Jack’ which alternated with John Fred & His Playboy Bands’ ‘Judy In Disguise (With Glasses)’ and then The 1910 Fruitgum Company’s ‘Simon Says’ which swapped places twice with Louis Armstrong’s ‘What A Wonderful World’.  This was the 10th time a song had regained the top spot on the charts and of the previous 9, there were 2 occasions where a song regained the top spot twice.

Dave Mills ‘Theresa’ was at 2 and we had to go back to February 1969 to see a local song this high in the charts when we saw The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ was at the top of the charts.

There were 2 songs that made the biggest climb this week and they were Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Down On The Corner’ and The Tremeloes’ ‘(Call Me) Number One’ which both moved up 6 places, landing at 10 and 14 respectively. The Tremeloes were the 12th act to reach 6 biggest climbers. This week we saw the 11th occasion where we had 2 biggest climbers and 2 biggest fallers. We had seen 5 other occasions when we had more than 1 climber and faller, but the number of fallers and climbers was not equal. The fallers this week were Lou Christie’s ‘I’m Gonna Make You Mine’ and Bobby Sherman’s ‘Little Woman’ which both fell 4 places to land at 11 and 17 respectively.

The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ continued as the oldest on the charts for both overall weeks and consecutive weeks. It was in its 24th week overall and 12th consecutive week for this run.

Only 1 song left the charts this week and that was The Outlet’s ‘Backstreet’. It had been with us for 6 weeks and peaked at 10 during that time. In terms of points, the song clocked up 40 which meant it just missed out on being in the top 50 for local hits to date, sharing 52nd spot with The Bats’ ‘That’s How I Feel’.

The local level of hits in the charts was maintained as Ken J. Larkin’s ‘Does Anybody Miss Me’ arrived to replace the departing Outlet track. The song was written by Johnny Worth and Les Reed, giving Reed a lead of 2 at the top of the hits count by a song writer list. He now had 15 song writing credits to his name and was 2 ahead of 2 Barrys (Mason and Gibb). ‘Does Anybody Miss Me’ was originally recorded by Shirley Bassey and was the title track and a single from her 1969 album. It was covered by a guy called David MacBeth, but neither version made the charts in the US or UK. It is a live favourite of Bassey’s.

We had a new outright leader on the local weeks count list as The Staccatos pulled 1 ahead of Four Jacks & A Jill with 69 to their name compared to the latter’s 68. The Staccatos were now the 5th act to have an outright lead on the local weeks count list with The Bats being the first leader to emerge from the cluster of acts on the first ever chart. They soon lost their crown to Gene Rockwell who only enjoyed the top spot on his own for 9 weeks before Murray Campbell caught up with him and then overtook him. Campbell had been at the top for 84 weeks when Gene Rockwell and Virginia Lee equalled him again. Rockwell and Lee shared the top spot for 1 week after going ahead of Campbell, then Rockwell regained the outright lead which he held on to for 30 weeks. Four Jacks & A Jill then took the number 1 spot for 98 weeks before sharing the lead with The Staccatos last week. The observant amongst you may have noticed that I mentioned 6 names in this list of leaders, but Virginia Lee never had the outright lead, only sharing it for 1 week with Murray Campbell and Gene Rockwell, then for a week with just Rockwell.

Tommy Roe also increased his week count to 69 and sat alongside The Staccatos at 11 on the overall weeks count list. Percy Sledge moved tied 16th with The Seekers, they were both on 66 and The Tremeloes took 18th place to themselves, their 55 to date pulling them 1 clear of The Monkees and Sandie Shaw who dropped to 19th.

Apart from the new outright number 1 on the local list we also saw The Bats reach the 40 weeks milestone. They took position 3 for themselves as Gene Rockwell on 39 dropped to 4. Further down the list, Ken J. Larkin ticked over to 15 weeks and sat tied 17th with Emil Dean and Groep Twee.

Not only were The Staccatos leading the way for weeks by a local act, their hit ‘Cry To Me’ now led the way overall for points. It had accumulated 316 to date and moved ahead of Four Jacks & A Jill’s ‘Timothy’ which was on 312.

Tommy Roe passed the 800 points landmark and he sat 11th overall for points.

The average weeks the song on the chart had been in the top 20 moved over the 7 mark for the first time in 93 weeks. It now sat on 7.05.

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5 December 1969

dont_forget_bee_gees

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 5 9 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
2 1 8 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
3 4 7 Theresa  – Dave Mills
4 3 6 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Bobbie Gentry
5 2 10 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
6 8 4 He ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother  – Hollies
7 9 5 I’m Gonna Make You Mine  – Lou Christie
8 6 23 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
9 7 7 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
10 12 4 Get Together  – Youngbloods
11 18 2 So Good Together  – Andy Kim
12 15 5 Faithful and True  – Percy Sledge
13 16 3 Little Woman  – Bobby Sherman
14 10 6 Backstreet  – Outlet
15 13 6 Love at First Sight  – Sounds Nice
16 New 1 Down on the Corner  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
17 New 1 Tracy  – Cuff Links
18 RE 18 I Need You  – Rick Nelson
19 New 1 Jam Up Jelly Tight  – Tommy Roe
20 New 1 (Call Me) Number One  – Tremeloes

I don’t think many people were expecting what happened at the top of the charts this week. The Bee Gees’ ‘Don’t For get To Remember’ had spent 3 weeks at 1, then dropped to 3, made a recovery to 2 then dropped to 5 and certainly looked like it was beginning its route down the charts, but suddenly it was back at 1. So far we had seen 3 songs move into the top spot for the first time when on 9 weeks or over and ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ was the 4th to regain the top spot at 9 weeks or more. Of the 7 songs in total that had moved into the top spot (for the first time or regaining it) every other one had done so from position2. ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ moved back to the top of the charts with a star rater climb of 4 places and joined 8 other songs to jump to number 1 from position 5 or higher.

The biggest climber was Andy Kim’s ‘So Good Together’ which moved up 7 places from 18 to 11. This was Kim’s first time with the biggest climber. ‘So Good Together’ and ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ (discussed above) were the only 2 star raters this week.

The Outlet’s ‘Backstreet’ took the biggest faller award as it dropped 4 from 10 to 14. This was the 50th time we had seen a local song take the biggest faller award.

Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Oh Well’ became the 9th song to spend just 1 week at number 20 as it fell off the chart after being a new entry at 20 last week. So far no act had managed 2 songs spending just 1 week at the bottom of the charts, but we came closest with this as Chicken Shack featuring Christine McVie had spent just a week at 20, however, Christine only joined Fleetwood Mac after ‘Oh Well’ was recorded, so close, but no cigar.

Cliff & Hank’s ‘Throw Down A Line’ didn’t fare much better, it spent a week at 20 and then 1 at 19 and that was it for the song. Cliff would be back on the charts, but this would be Hank’s only hit as a credited artist (he had had hits as part of The Shadows) and it would be his last where he would have a song writing credit.

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Green River’ left the chart too. It had been with us for 9 weeks and peaked at 5. Their 2 previous hits (and only other to date excluding the new entry this week noted below) were both chart toppers and both spent 13 weeks on the charts, so ‘Green River’ broke with tradition there.

The oldest on last week’s chart, Jackie DeShannon’s ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’ also left the charts. It managed 12 weeks in the top 20, 2 of which were at the top spot. This would be the sum total of Jackie’s SA chart success. The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ took over as the oldest for a consecutive run, it was on 11 weeks with this chart run and 23 weeks if its previous run was included.

Last to go was The Box Tops’ ‘Soul Deep’ which spent 10 weeks on the charts and peaked at 2, its highest peak of their 3 hits to date, but falling 8 weeks short of the 18 that their first hit, ‘The Letter’ had managed. They still had 1 hit left in them.

Creedence Clearwater Revival became the 8th act to have a song leave the chart the same week they had a new entry as ‘Down On The Corner’ arrived to replace the departing ‘Green River’. There had actually been 9 occasions where an act had replaced themselves on the charts and it was Cliff Richard who had managed it twice. ‘Down On The Corner’ would go to number 3 on the US charts where it was released as a double a-sided single with ‘Fortunate Son’ on the flipside. In the UK it would make it to number 31.

The second new entry was The Cuff Links’ ‘Tracy’. It was the second song to chart by the song writing pair of Lee Pockriss and Paul Vance. The duo had also brought us Verdelle Smith’s ‘Tar And Cement’ and Vance had had a hand in The Bachelor’s ‘Can I Trust You’ as well. ‘Tracy’ went to 9 in the US and 4 in the UK and would top the Canadian charts. The Cuff Links were a studio band that featured Ron Dante on vocals. Dante was also the voice behind another studio group who were sitting at 5 this week, The Archies.

Rick Nelson’s ‘I Need You’ had been the number 1 song on our very first chart and was also the last song on that first chart to leave the top 20. But now it was back, re-entering the charts at 18 this week. Not only would the 218 weeks gap between the first and second run the song had be the all time biggest gap for a song re-entering the charts, it was also the new biggest gap between hits to date, beating the 159 weeks that The Animals had seen between their hits.

Tommy Roe also returned to the charts, but he had a new hit and had only been absent from the top 20 for 8 weeks. The new one was ‘Jam Up, Jelly Tight’ and it had the distinction of being the 200th song by a solo male artist to make our charts. It was his 17th hit to chart in the US and it went to number 8, returning him to the top 10 there following 2 hits that made top 50 but failed to make the top 20. It would also bag him a number 10 peak in what was then Rhodesia. This was the 3rd SA chart hit for Roe where he had teamed up with Freddie Weller to write the song.

The final new entry was the 5th SA chart hit for The Tremeloes. ‘(Call Me) Number One’ was their 18th UK hit where, despite the song’s title, it went to number 2. The band were nearing the end of their UK chart career as they would only have 4 further hits, only 1 of which would reach the top 30. ‘(Call Me) Number One’ would fare well in Europe going to 3 in Germany, 4 in Norway, 5 in Switzerland and Austria, 9 in Belgium and 17 in Holland. Closer to home it would reach number 3 in what was then Rhodesia.

Tommy Roe and The Staccatos both moved on to 68 weeks and joined Cliff Richard, Four Jacks & A Jill and Petula Clark on that total, so we had 5 acts tied at 11 on the weeks count list. The Tremeloes new one pushed their total on to 54 and they move into tied 18th spot on the weeks count list, joining Sandie Shaw there. The result of this was that Lucille Starr fell out of the top 20 of the weeks count list after being there for 92 weeks. The big news on the local list was that The Staccatos finally caught up with Four Jacks & A Jill at the top of the list with both acts on 68. The latter had been at number 1 on that list for 98 weeks.

The other good news for The Staccatos was that ‘Cry To Me’ moved past the 300 points milestone. It was the 4th song to manage this and it sat 3rd overall with 303 points, 1 more than Sandy Posey’s ‘Single Girl’, 4 behind Tommy Roe’s ‘Sweet Pea’ and 10 behind top song to date, Four Jacks & A Jill’s ‘Timothy’. Also on the points front, The Bee Gees saw their total go past the 1,200 mark and Elvis moved past 600. The Bee Gees sat 3rd overall for points and Elvis was 22nd.

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28 November 1969

suspicious_minds_elvis2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
2 4 9 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
3 7 5 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Bobbie Gentry
4 5 6 Theresa  – Dave Mills
5 2 8 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
6 3 22 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
7 9 6 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
8 13 3 He ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother  – Hollies
9 14 4 I’m Gonna Make You Mine  – Lou Christie
10 12 5 Backstreet  – Outlet
11 6 10 Soul Deep  – Box Tops
12 16 3 Get Together  – Youngbloods
13 10 5 Love at First Sight  – Sounds Nice
14 8 12 Put a Little Love in Your Heart  – Jackie DeShannon
15 17 4 Faithful and True  – Percy Sledge
16 19 2 Little Woman  – Bobby Sherman
17 11 9 Green River  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
18 New 1 So Good Together  – Andy Kim
19 20 2 Throw Down A Line  – Cliff & Hank
20 New 1 Oh Well  – Fleetwood Mac

Elvis’ ‘Suspicious Minds’ clocked up a 3rd week at number 1, seeing off the renewed interest in the top spot that The Bee Gees’ ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ had shown last week. The latter had moved back up the charts to 2, after dropping to 3 from 1 the previous week, however, it now fell to 5 and the new number 2 was The Archies’ ‘La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down’ which was looking to get the band a second chart topper.

The Hollies ‘He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother’ took the biggest climber for a second week running as it moved up 5 from 13 to 8. This was their 7th biggest climber and they were the 5th act to manage this many. They did share the biggest climber award this week with Lou Christie’s ‘I’m Gonna Make You Mine’ which moved up 5 to 9.

Bobbie Gentry’s ‘I’ll Never Fall In Love Again’ and The Youngbloods’ ‘Get Together’ were the other star raters this week. They both climbed 4 places to land at 3 and 12 respectively.

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Green River’ was the biggest faller for a second week running. It shared the honours with Jackie DeShannon’s ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’ last week, but this week its 6 place fall from 11 to 17 made it the sole biggest faller this week.

The aforementioned Jackie DeShannon hit enjoyed its 3rd week as the oldest on the chart. It sat on 12 weeks.

Neil Diamond’s ‘Sweet Caroline’ was the 20th song to finish its chart run with its peak position equalling the number of weeks it had been in the top 20. That equal weeks and peak figure was 7 and it was the 5th time we had seen that number come up. This now equalled the number of times we had seen a song have an equal weeks and peak figure of 8 and was the most seen to date. Diamond could take comfort from the fact that he would grace our charts again.

The Equals’ ‘Viva Bobby Joe’ was the only other song to leave the top 20 this week. It had spent 6 weeks with us and peaked at 9 and was their overall worst performing song as this finished their SA chart career. They had managed 3 hits, spent a total of 28 weeks on the charts and enjoyed 3 weeks at number 1 with ‘Baby Come Back’. While we would not see The Equals on our chart again, their lead singer Eddy Grant would be back.

Andy Kim’s ‘So Good Together’ was the first of 2 new entries this week. It was Kim’s second hit on our charts and the 16th by a Canadian artist (if you include Canadian Steve Karliski’s duet with American Mimi Roman). The gap between this and Andy Kim’s last hit was 53 weeks which was a new record gap between hits for a Canadian artist, beating the 13 weeks Stu Phillips had experienced between 2 of his hits. The song would be his 5th US Hot 100 hit where it would go to number 36. It would not make the UK charts but would get to 37 in Germany, 22 in Holland , 15 in Canada and 38 in Australia. As with his only other SA chart hit to date, ‘How’d We Ever Get This Way’, Kim shared song writing credits with Jeff Barry. Kim had 4 to his name so far as song writer (the other 2 being hits for The Archies) and Barry was on 8 and sat 9th overall on the number of hits by a song writer list.

Fleetwood Mac returned for a second outing in our charts. Their new one was ‘Oh Well’ and like their previous hit, ‘Man Of The World’, it was written by Peter Green who was still in the group at the time. The song got to number 55 in the US and spent 2 frustrating weeks at 2 in the UK during The Archies’ ‘Sugar Sugar’s 7 week run at number 1 there.

The American acts had now pulled 11 clear of their British counterparts for hits count. They were on 231 compared to 220 for the Brits.

Cliff Richard moved into tied 11th place on the weeks count list, his 68 weeks to date putting him level with Four Jacks & A Jill and Petula Clark. The Staccatos were just behind those 3 acts, their 67 moving them into 14th place which they shared with Tommy Roe.

The average number of weeks the songs in the top 20 had been in the charts moved back above 6 after being below that mark for 2 weeks. It now sat at 6.2 but was still a way off the record highest level to date of 8.75.

A final point is that this week marked the longest period to date that we had seen where The Rolling Stones did not feature on the charts. They had now been absent for 63 weeks. In comparison, the longest we had been without Tom Jones in the charts so far was 40 weeks.

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21 November 1969

suspicious_minds_elvis2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
2 3 7 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
3 4 21 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
4 2 8 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
5 9 5 Theresa  – Dave Mills
6 7 9 Soul Deep  – Box Tops
7 11 4 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Bobbie Gentry
8 6 11 Put a Little Love in Your Heart  – Jackie DeShannon
9 10 5 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
10 8 4 Love at First Sight  – Sounds Nice
11 5 8 Green River  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
12 13 4 Backstreet  – Outlet
13 18 2 He ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother  – Hollies
14 17 3 I’m Gonna Make You Mine  – Lou Christie
15 15 6 Viva Bobby Joe  – Equals
16 19 2 Get Together  – Youngbloods
17 16 3 Faithful and True  – Percy Sledge
18 14 7 Sweet Caroline  – Neil Diamond
19 New 1 Little Woman  – Bobby Sherman
20 New 1 Throw Down A Line  – Cliff & Hank

While Elvis’ ‘Suspicious Minds’ enjoyed a second week at number 1 (and it’s 5th week at the top in total), the previous number 1, The Bee Gees’ ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’, was creeping back up the charts. Last week it had dropped from 1 to 3, but it moved back up to 2 to make The King a little nervous.

The Hollies became the 11th act to reach the 6 biggest climber awards mark as ‘He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother’ climbed 5 from 18 to 13 to take the honours this week. This was only the 5th of their 11 hits to date to take the award with ‘Sorry Suzanne’ the only song to manage it twice.

Dave Mills’ ‘Theresa’ climbed 4 from 9 to 5 to be the 30th time a song by a local solo male artist had picked up a star rater climb. Bobbie Gentry’s ‘I’ll Never Fall In Love Again’ also made a star rater climb, moving up 4 from 11 to 7. This was the 26th time an American female artist had picked up a star rater.

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Green River’ picked up a second biggest faller award for the band as it dropped 6 places from 5 to 11 to add to their biggest faller award that ‘Proud Mary’ had picked up 17 weeks previously.

Jackie DeShannon’s ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’ continued as the oldest in the top 20 based on consecutive weeks. It was in its 11th week. The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ was the oldest if weeks from a previous run in the chart was included as it was in its 21st week in total, but only the 9th of this run. This equalled the total of 21 weeks that Four Jacks & A Jill’s ‘Master Jack’ managed and was tied second highest for a song to date, 3 behind the 24 that Tommy Roe’s Sweet Pea’ managed.

The Guess Who’s ‘Laughing’ was the 8th song so far to spend just 1 week at 20 as it fell off the chart after arriving there last week. This was the second song by a Canadian artist to spent a single week at the bottom of the charts, the previous being Lucille Starr’s ‘Who’s Gonna Stand By Me’. We were not done yet with The Guess Who.

The other song to go was The Staccatos’ ‘Hold On To What You’ve Got’. This lasted 6 weeks on the charts and peaked at 12, their second lowest peak to date. The song spent its final week at number 12 which equalled the highest position to date for a local song to leave the charts from. Both Ian and Ritchie’s ‘Look Across The River’ and Judy Page Ft Kimbo’s ‘Montreal’ had finished their chart runs at 12.

Bobby Sherman made his SA Chart debut with a song called ‘Little Woman’. It was his first US Hot 100 hit and it would go to number 3 there.  He would have a further 9 hits on those charts but none of them managed to get as high as this. Sherman would chart in the UK (with ‘Julia Do Ya Love Me?’) but ‘Little Woman’ would not make it on those charts. On the Cashbox charts (a rival publication to the official Billboard charts), the song would go to number 1. It would make number 2 in Canada. Sherman himself has had the honour of being mentioned in 2 episodes of The Simpsons, including one where Marge admits to having had a crush on him.

The second new entry was Cliff Richard’s 50th hit to make the UK charts and his 12th to make our top 20. He moved to the top of the hits count list, joining Tom Jones there on 12. For his new one he teamed up with his old backing band mate Hank Marvin. Marvin was the lead guitarist of The Shadows and the new entry this week, ‘Throw Down A Line’ was credited to ‘Cliff & Hank’. The song was written by Hank and it was his 3rd SA chart hit as a song writer. He had co-written ‘In The Country’ which showed Cliff Richard & The Shadows as the artist and Cliff’s solo hit, ‘Don’t Forget To Catch Me’. ‘Throw Down A Line’ made it to 7 in the UK. It was the 14th song by a duet/collaboration of acts to chart in SA.

Not only did he have the number 1 song this week, but Elvis Presley was also busy celebrating his 50th week in the chart. He was the 4th of 6 acts who would reach 50 weeks on the charts with a song sitting at number 1. Tom Jones, Four Jacks & A Jill and Tommy Roe were the 3 previous artists to manage this.

Cliff Richard moved up to 13th on the weeks count list. He had 67 weeks to his name and he now equalled the total that Tommy Roe had managed. The Staccatos were 1 week behind Cliff on 66 and moved into tied 15th place with The Seekers. They were also now 1 week behind Four Jacks & A Jill who were at the top of the local list. The Bats moved 1 ahead of Virginia Lee to make 4th spot on the local list their own. They were on 37 weeks, 2 behind 3rd placed Gene Rockwell.

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