14 November 1969

suspicious_minds_elvis2

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 5 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
2 4 7 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
3 1 6 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
4 3 20 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
5 7 7 Green River  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
6 8 10 Put a Little Love in Your Heart  – Jackie DeShannon
7 5 8 Soul Deep  – Box Tops
8 13 3 Love at First Sight  – Sounds Nice
9 11 4 Theresa  – Dave Mills
10 6 4 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
11 14 3 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Bobbie Gentry
12 15 6 Hold on to What You’ve Got  – Staccatos
13 17 3 Backstreet  – Outlet
14 10 6 Sweet Caroline  – Neil Diamond
15 9 5 Viva Bobby Joe  – Equals
16 20 2 Faithful and True  – Percy Sledge
17 19 2 I’m Gonna Make You Mine  – Lou Christie
18 New 1 He ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother  – Hollies
19 New 1 Get Together  – Youngbloods
20 New 1 Laughing  – Guess Who

Barry and Maurice Gibb were denied the opportunity to move ahead of brother Robin for weeks at 1 by a song writer as their composition, ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ dropped to 3 this week. The new number 1 was ‘Suspicious Minds’ by Elvis Presley and it set a new record for gaps between chart toppers as we had last seen Elvis at the top of our charts on 20 August 1965 when ‘Crying In The Chapel’ was the nation’s favourite song. It was Elvis’ 3rd number 1 on our charts (the other one being ‘Do The Clam’). He joined The Troggs, The Bee Gees and The Rolling Stones in tied 2nd place for number of number 1s and they all sat behind Tom Jones who led the way with 5.

Sounds Nice’s ‘Love At First Sight’ took the climber of the week award, moving up 5 from 13 to 8. This was the 13th time we had seen an instrumental hit take the biggest climber award.

The Outlet’s ‘Backstreet’ and Percy Sledge’s ‘Faithful And True’ were the other star raters this week, both climbing 4 to land at 13 and 16 respectively. Sledge was the 9th act so far to reach 11 star raters.

The Equals picked up a 2nd biggest faller award as ‘Viva Bobby Joe’ dropped 6 from 9 to 15 to take the honours this week.

Robin Gibb’s ‘Saved By The Bell’ dropped off the top 20. It had spent 12 weeks on the charts, 3 of which were at the top spot. Robin would re-join The Bee Gees in the August of 1970, but would have further SA chart success as a solo artist, however we did have to wait a good while for that.

The Oldest song on last week’s chart, The Archies’ ‘Sugar Sugar’ also left the top 20. It had been with us for 18 weeks, 3 of which were at number 1. They would feature in the charts again at a later date.

The last song to go was Cilla Black’s ‘Conversations’ which spent 9 weeks in the top 20 and peaked at 6. This would not be her only SA chart hit.

The new oldest on the charts was Jackie DeShannon’s ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’ which sat on 10 weeks. This excludes The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ which became the 5th song to reach the 20 weeks in the top 20 milestone, however it had only managed this as a broken run of 12 and now a further 8 in this, its second run on the charts. Of the 5 songs to reach 20 weeks so far, 3 were by local acts and 2 by US acts and 2 of the 3 local ones were by Four Jacks & A Jill.

Our first new entry was a song that took just under 19 years from first entering the UK charts before topping them. The Hollies ‘He Ain’t Heavy He’s My Brother’ had its first UK chart run from 4 October 1969 to 10 January 1970 with a peak of 3, then on 3 September 1988, following its use in a Miller Lite advert, it re-entered the UK charts and moved up to number 1, gaining the top spot on 24 September 1988 and sitting there for 2 weeks. In the US it would make it to number 7. The song, which featured a yet to be famous Elton John on piano, was The Hollies’ 11th to grace our charts and this placed them tied 2nd for hits count, equalling Cliff Richard’s total and sitting 1 behind Tom Jones’ 12.

Our second new entry began life in 1964 when The Kingston Trio recorded a song called ‘Let’s Get Together’ which was written by Chet Powers. The Youngbloods, whose version was our new entry this week, released their cover of the song as ‘Get Together’ in 1967. It would get to 62 on the US Hot 100 that year, but in 1969 if gained renewed interest and went all the way up to number 5.

Our last new entry was the 15th song by a Canadian act to charts and a 2nd hit for The Guess Who. As with ‘These Eyes’, their previous hit, ‘Laughing’ was written by Randy Bachman and Burton Cummings. The song would spend a week at the top of the Canadian charts and make it to number 10 in the US. The Canadians, who sat 4th on the hits count list behind acts from The US, The UK and SA, were now more than double their closest rivals, the Australians as they had 15 compared to the Aussie’s 7.

The Bee Gees were now in 3rd place on their own on the weeks count list as their 92 pulled them 1 clear of The Rolling Stones. They now sat 9 behind second placed The Troggs, but had a long way to go to catch up to leader Tom Jones who was on 135. The Hollies shrugged off Manfred Mann to have 7th position on the list to themselves, their 82 weeks to date moving them 1 clear of Manfred Mann. On the local list, The Bats moved level 4th with Virginia Lee, both acts being on 36 weeks. Ahead of them were Gene Rockwell on 39, The Staccatos on 64 and Four Jacks & A Jill on 67.

On the points front both The Archies and The Staccatos moved passed the 600 points mark with The Staccatos (who had 2 in the charts) moving into 20th place overall for points with 624 to their name and The Archies sat 21st with a total of 610.

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7 November 1969

dont_forget_bee_gees

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 5 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
2 5 4 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
3 3 19 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
4 4 6 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
5 2 7 Soul Deep  – Box Tops
6 13 3 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
7 7 6 Green River  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
8 6 9 Put a Little Love in Your Heart  – Jackie DeShannon
9 10 4 Viva Bobby Joe  – Equals
10 9 5 Sweet Caroline  – Neil Diamond
11 12 3 Theresa  – Dave Mills
12 8 9 Conversations  – Cilla Black
13 17 2 Love at First Sight  – Sounds Nice
14 18 2 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Bobbie Gentry
15 14 5 Hold on to What You’ve Got  – Staccatos
16 11 18 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
17 20 2 Backstreet  – Outlet
18 15 12 Saved by the Bell  – Robin Gibb
19 New 1 I’m Gonna Make You Mine  – Lou Christie
20 New 1 Faithful and True  – Percy Sledge

Barry and Maurice Gibb caught up to their brother Robin for weeks spent at 1 as song writers as ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ spent a 3rd week at 1, giving Barry and Maurice their 14th week in total at the top as song writers equalling Robin’s total. Having The Bee Gees at 1 meant that acts from the UK had now occupied the top spot for a total of 100 weeks.

The Box Top’s ‘Soul Deep’ dropped from the number 2 spot to 5 and Elvis’ ‘Suspicious Minds’ filled the vacuum it left.

The Bats enjoyed their 2 biggest climber award with ‘Who’s That Girl’ taking the honours for its 7 place climb from 13 to 6. This equalled their biggest climb in a week to date which ‘Groen En Goud’ had managed. They had been a tad unlucky along the way, missing out on biggest climbs when ‘Shabby Little Huts’ 5 place climb and the 6 place climb ‘Who’s That Girl’ managed last week were outdone by songs making bigger climbs in those particular weeks.

Bobbie Gentry’s ‘I’ll Never Fall In Love Again’ and Sounds Nice’s ‘Love At First Sight’ were the ones missing out on biggest climbs, but they still made star rater jumps both moving up 4 to land at 14 and 13 respectively.

The Archies’ ‘Sugar Sugar’ was the faller of the week and the oldest on the chart. It dropped 6 from 10 to 16 and was in its 18th week with us. The previous song to make 18 consecutive weeks was Hilary’s ‘Sunglasses’ back in October 1968 and that went on to reach 19 weeks. We had to go back to the May of 1968 to see a song reach 20 weeks and that was Four Jacks & A Jill’s ‘Master Jack’. It should also be mentioned that The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ which was at 3 this week was in its 19th week in total, but 12 of those were in a previous run.

And talking of non-consecutive weeks, Quentin E. Klopjaeger’s ‘Abergavenny’ fell out of the top 20 after spending just 2 weeks with us in its second run. In total the song lasted 6 weeks in the charts and peaked at 15.

Also going was Joe Dolan’s ‘Make Me An Island’ which spent 10 weeks with us, peaking at 2 for 1 week and kept off the top spot by Robin Gibb’s ‘Saved By The Bell’.

The first of the new entries was by a guy called Luigi Alfredo Giovanni Sacco, but fortunately for the local DJ’s sake he changed it to Lou Christie. His song was ‘I’m Gonna Make You Mine’. Despite his very Italian sounding name, Christie was born and raised in America. ‘I’m Gonna Make You Mine’ would be his first top 10 hit in the US since he hit the number 1 spot with ‘Lightnin’ Strikes’ back in the February of 1966. He had had 5 hot 100 hundred hits in between with only 1 going top 30. He fared better in the UK with ‘I’m Gonna Make You Mine’ which went to number 2 there, kept off the top spot by The Archies’ ‘Sugar Sugar’.

Percy Sledge saw his 7th hit to date join the top 20 this week. The new one was ‘Faithful And True’ which was his first SA chart hit that would not appear on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US. That may be because in the US the song was on the b-side of ‘True Love Travels On A Gravel Road’, but even that song did not make the charts in the US. We had seen the name of 2 of the 3 song writers of ‘Faithful And True’ on our charts before with Dan Penn having writing credits on The Box Tops’ ‘Cry Like A Baby’ and Marlon Greene co-writing ‘Cover Me’, one of Percy’s previous hits. It was only Jeanie Greene who was enjoying her first SA chart hit as a song writer.

The chart this week was divided into 10 songs from acts from America and 5 each from local acts and British acts. This would be the only time we would see this combination on the charts and it was 1 of 131 combinations of songs from those 3 nations that we would only see once in the top 20 (positions 21 to 30 excluded after the charts expanded). The most common combination we would see involving those 3 nations was 9 from the UK, 6 from the US and 0 local songs.

The Bee Gees moved tied 3rd on the weeks count list, their 91 to date equalling The Rolling Stones total. Only The Troggs on 101 and Tom Jones on 135 had more weeks to their names.

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31 October 1969

dont_forget_bee_gees

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 4 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
2 3 6 Soul Deep  – Box Tops
3 5 18 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
4 4 5 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
5 8 3 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
6 2 8 Put a Little Love in Your Heart  – Jackie DeShannon
7 10 5 Green River  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
8 6 8 Conversations  – Cilla Black
9 7 4 Sweet Caroline  – Neil Diamond
10 16 3 Viva Bobby Joe  – Equals
11 9 17 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
12 20 2 Theresa  – Dave Mills
13 19 2 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
14 17 4 Hold on to What You’ve Got  – Staccatos
15 12 11 Saved by the Bell  – Robin Gibb
16 11 10 Make Me an Island  – Joe Dolan
17 New 1 Love at First Sight  – Sounds Nice
18 New 1 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Bobbie Gentry
19 18 6 Abergavenny  – Quentin E. Klopjaeger
20 New 1 Backstreet  – Outlet

‘Don’t Forget to Remember’ by The Bee Gees spent a second week at 1 meaning that Barry and Robin were now just 1 week behind brother Robin for weeks spent at number 1 as a song writer. Robin stood on 14 and his 2 brothers were on 13. The Box Tops’ ‘Soul Deep’ crept 1 place closer to the top spot as it moved from 3 to 2.

Dave Mills’ ‘Theresa’ was the biggest climber, moving up 8 from 20 to 12. This was the 18th time a local male artist had taken the biggest climber award.

There were 2 other songs that made star rater climbs and those were The Equals’ ‘Viva Bobby Joe’ and The Bats’ ‘Who’s That Girl’ both climbing 6 places to land at 10 and 13 respectively .It was a 5th star rater for The Equals and a 3rd for The Bats.

Joe Dolan’s ‘Make Me An Island’ picked up its 2nd biggest faller award (and a 2nd for Dolan) as it fell 5 from 11 to 16.

The Archies’ ‘Sugar Sugar’ moved on to 17 weeks in the charts. We had to go back to 17 January 1969 to see a song reach 17 consecutive weeks in the charts. The Staccatos’ Cry To Me’ had been in the charts for a total of 18 weeks now, but these were not consecutive weeks.

The Dells’ ‘Sing a Rainbow/Love is Blue’ was the first of 3 songs to leave the chart this week. It had been with us for 6 weeks and peaked at 9. It was joined by Jill Kirkland’s ‘Katrina’s Theme’ which also managed 6 weeks, but only peaked at 11. Last to go was Johnny Cash’s ‘A Boy Named Sue’ which did not fare as well as the other leavers this week as it only peaked at 13 during a 4 week stay. For all 3 act on these departing song, these hits would be all the SA chart action they would see.

The first new entry was the 19th instrumental to grace out charts. Sounds Nice’s ‘Love At First Sight’ was the instrumental version of ‘Je T’aime…Moi Non Plus’ which had been a hit for Jane Birkin and Serge Gainbourg and had spent a week at number 1 in the UK 3 weeks earlier. However, the breathy vocals of Birkin and the explicit nature of the lyrics (albeit in French) led to the song being banned in numerous countries and so the instrumental version gained popularity. Sounds Nice’s version made it to number 18 in the UK. The group apparently got their name from what Paul McCartney said when he heard the track.

Bobbie Gentry had not been in our charts since ‘Ode To Billy Joe’ spent its last week with us on 27 October 1967. She returned to the top 20 this week with her second hit, ‘I’ll Never Fall In Love Again’ The gap of 105 weeks between her hits was the 14th biggest any artist had experienced so far and the 3rd biggest for a female artist. The song would be a 6th hit for song writer Hal David and a 5th for co-writer, Burt Bacharach and should not be confused with a song with the same title that was a SA chart hit for Tom Jones in 1967. The song would top the UK charts for 1 week, knocking the aforementioned ‘Je T’aime…Moi Non Plus’ off the top spot in the process. In the US it would be Dionne Warwick’s version that would have the most success, going to number 6 on the Hot 100. Bacharach’s own version would give him a number 93 hit.

The final new entry was by a local band called The Outlet. The song was ‘Backstreet’ which was written and produced by John Norwell. The band included Peter Vee and Neil Herbert who would both go on to have hits in the SA charts (Vee as a solo artist as well as a member of Buffalo) and Clive Clader who would start up the Jive record label which would sign a number of successful international acts such as Britney Spears, N’Sync and is a strange harping back to this first hit for Calder and The Outlet, he would also sign the Backstreet Boys.

The artists on the top 3 hits this week were all celebrating milestones for weeks in the chart with The Bee Gees reaching the 90 week mark, The Box Tops celebrating 30 weeks and The Staccatos ticking over to 60 weeks. The Bee Gees were unmoved at 4 on the weeks count list, just 1 behind 3rd placed The Rolling Stones. They no longer shared 4th place with Herman’s Hermits who dropped to 5 as they did not add anything to their 89 they had seen to date. The Staccatos who clocked up 2 weeks this week as they had 2 in the charts, moved into 16th place on the list while The Box Tops were the 42nd act to reach 30 weeks.

On the local list, The Bats moved 1 clear of Murray Campbell’s 33 weeks as they ticked over to 34. The Bats remained 5th while Murray Campbell dropped to 6th.

The Bee Gees not only celebrated 90 weeks on the charts but they also moved past the 1,100 points mark to land on 1,108. They were 5th on the points to date list, but were just 5 points behind 4th placed Beach Boys.

Youtube playlist:

24 October 1969

dont_forget_bee_gees

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 3 3 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
2 1 7 Put a Little Love in Your Heart  – Jackie DeShannon
3 2 5 Soul Deep  – Box Tops
4 7 4 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
5 11 17 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
6 8 7 Conversations  – Cilla Black
7 9 3 Sweet Caroline  – Neil Diamond
8 18 2 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
9 6 16 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
10 17 4 Green River  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
11 4 9 Make Me an Island  – Joe Dolan
12 5 10 Saved by the Bell  – Robin Gibb
13 14 4 A Boy Named Sue  – Johnny Cash
14 15 6 Katrina’s Theme  – Jill Kirkland
15 10 6 Sing a Rainbow/Love is Blue  – Dells
16 20 2 Viva Bobby Joe  – Equals
17 19 3 Hold on to What You’ve Got  – Staccatos
18 RE 5 Abergavenny  – Quentin E. Klopjaeger
19 New 1 Who’s That Girl  – Bats
20 New 1 Theresa  – Dave Mills

‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ moved into the number 1 spot, ousting Jackie DeShannon’s ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’ after the latter had been at 1 for 2 weeks. Barry and Maurice, who had penned the new chart topper, now sat 2 weeks behind their brother Robin for weeks at 1 by a song writer. All 3 brothers had been credited on the previous 2 Bee Gees chart toppers and the 1 non-Bee Gee track that they wrote which topped the chart, The Marbles’ ‘Only One Woman’, but Robin had pulled ahead of them for weeks at 1 by a song writer with his recent 3 week stint at the top of the charts with ‘Saved By The Bell’ which he penned on his own.  Robin stood on 14 weeks at 1 and was the overall leader for this. Barry and Maurice were in tied 2nd place on 12 and they were 2 weeks ahead of The Troggs’ Reg Presley who was in 4th place with 10.

Elvis picked up his 6th biggest climber award to date with ‘Suspicious Minds’ climbing 10 from 18 to 8. This was the 31st time we had seen a song climb 10 or more places and Elvis joined Tom Jones and Donovan as the only acts so far to manage this twice. Elvis was the 10th act to reach 6 biggest climbers.

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Green River’ was the next biggest climber, jumping up 7 from 17 to 10 to give them their 5th star rater climb. The Staccatos picked up a 9th star rater as ‘Cry To Me’ climbed 6 places to number 5. They were the 17th act to reach 9 star raters and were now 4 clear of the next highest for a local act which was Four Jacks & A Jill. ‘Cry To Me’ had now made a total of 5 star rater climbs, the next best that a song had managed was 3. Overall we would see a few other songs make 5 star rater climbs, but no other one would manage it in the top 20 era. The Equals were also adding to their star rater count as ‘Viva Bobby Joe’ moved up 4 from 20 to 16. It was their 4th star rater.

2 songs fell 7 places each to take the biggest faller award and those were Joe Dolan’s ‘Make Me An Island’ and Robin Gibb’s ‘Saved By The Bell’ which dropped to 11 and 12 respectively. This was a first biggest faller for both artists.

The Archies’ ‘Sugar Sugar’ moved on to 16 weeks and was the oldest on the charts for a second week. Before the previous oldest, Booker T & The MG’s ‘Time Is Tight’, also managed to get to 16 weeks and we had not seen a song reach this total since the January of 1969, now we had had 2 in the space of 3 weeks.

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s second run with 2 in the charts came to an end as ‘Bad Moon Rising’ was the first of 3 songs to leave the top 20 this week. This run with 2 in the charts lasted 3 weeks compared to their previous one which ran for 4 weeks. ‘Bad Moon Rising’ spent 13 weeks on the charts, 1 of which was at number 1.

Ken J. Larkin’s ‘Turn Around’ also left the charts. It had been with us for 14 weeks and peaked at 5. In terms of points this was the 15th best performance so far by a local song. Ken would return to the charts at a later date.

Last to go was The Marmalade’s ‘Baby Make It Soon’ which managed to get as high as number 3 during its 9 weeks with us. Like Ken J. we would see them on our charts again.

This week we saw a record to date 3 local songs coming into the chart, although 1 of the 3 was a re-entry. We would see 3 local new entries in a week in the future, but for the moment, this was the record.

The highest of the song coming into the charts was the re-entry and that was Quentin E. Klopjaeger’s ‘Abergavenny’. This was the 13th song to re-enter the charts and the second local one to do so. The other local one was sitting at 5 on this week’s chart. ‘Abergavenny’ had only been out the chart 1 week.

The Bats became the 5th local act to reach 5 hits as ‘Who’s That Girl’ was one of the new entries this week. Other than their first 2 hits – ‘Shabby Little Hut’ and ‘That’s How I Feel’ – all The Bats’ hits had been written by the band. They had also penned Judy Page’s hit ‘Montreal’ so the 4 members of The Bats had 4 song writing credits to their respective names.

The final new entry was by Dave Mills who was actually born in England, but made his music in South Africa, so I have classified him as local. His first hit ‘Theresa’ was a second SA Chart hit for Terry Dempsey as song writer (his first was The Staccatos’ ‘Butchers & Bakers’). Dempsey, who also produced the single, met Mills when the latter was in South Africa and signed him to his (Dempsey’s) Storm Record label. Mills would go on to win the 1970 Sarie for best male vocalist.

We now had 6 songs by local acts on the charts, something we had not seen since 27 September 1968, which was 57 weeks previously. ‘Theresa’ was also the 90th local song to make the charts.

This week also saw The Archies reach the 40 weeks on the charts mark and Creedence Clearwater Revival make it to 30.

The Bee Gees moved tied 4th on the hits count list. Their 89 to date put them level with Herman’s Hermits. On the local front, Ken J. Larkin’s 14 weeks to date placed him tied 19th with The A-Cads, Group 66 and Judy Page.

Last week we saw The Archies reach the 500 points mark, and this week it was Elvis’ turn to get there as he ticked over to 502 points. We had seen 27 acts now pass this landmark for points.

Youtube playlist:

17 October 1969

put_a_little_love_jackie_deshannon

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Put a Little Love in Your Heart  – Jackie DeShannon
2 3 4 Soul Deep  – Box Tops
3 13 2 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
4 4 8 Make Me an Island  – Joe Dolan
5 2 9 Saved by the Bell  – Robin Gibb
6 6 15 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
7 12 3 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
8 8 6 Conversations  – Cilla Black
9 18 2 Sweet Caroline  – Neil Diamond
10 9 5 Sing a Rainbow/Love is Blue  – Dells
11 15 16 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
12 5 9 Baby Make it Soon  – Marmalade
13 7 14 Turn Around  – Ken J. Larkin
14 14 3 A Boy Named Sue  – Johnny Cash
15 11 5 Katrina’s Theme  – Jill Kirkland
16 10 13 Bad Moon Rising  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
17 19 3 Green River  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
18 New 1 Suspicious Minds  – Elvis Presley
19 20 2 Hold on to What You’ve Got  – Staccatos
20 New 1 Viva Bobby Joe  – Equals

Jackie DeShannon spent a second week at 1 with ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’ while The Box Tops’ ‘Soul Deep’ moved up 1 place to sit at 2 to challenge it.

Another big challenger for the top spot came in the form of The Bee Gees’ ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ which was the biggest climber this week, jumping up 10 places from 13 to 3. This was the band’s 8th biggest climber award and they sat tied 3rd for number of biggest climbers, equal with The Troggs, 1 behind the 9 of Herman’s Hermits and 2 behind leader, Tom Jones on 10. This was the 32nd time a song had climbed 10 or more places in a week and the 15th time is had been a UK act involved. The Americans had 12 such climbs to their name.

Neil Diamond’s ‘Sweet Caroline’ just missed out on being biggest climber. Its 9 place jump was the 4th time a song moving up this many places had failed to be the biggest climber. However, we had also seen 2 occasions where a 10 place climb didn’t bag the biggest climber award.

The Archies’ ‘la-Dee-Doo-Down-Down’ and The Staccatos’ ‘Cry to Me’ were the other star raters this week with the former moving up 5 places to 7 and the latter climbing 4 to 11. The Staccatos were now well in front for number of star raters by a local act as their 8 to date was 3 ahead of nearest rivals, Four Jacks & A Jill who were on 5.

The biggest faller award went to The Marmalade’s ‘Baby Make It Soon’ which dropped 7 from 5 to 12.

Quentin E. Klopjaeger’s ‘Abergavenny’ dropped off the charts after a run of 4 weeks and a peak of 15. This was 1 week less and 1 place lower than his previous hit, ‘Melody Fayre’, had managed in terms of weeks and peak. We had not seen the last of this Billy Forrest character.

The other song to leave the charts was Booker T & The MG’s ‘Time Is Tight’ which had been with us for 16 week and spent 3 of those at number 1. We had to go back to 17 January 1969 when we last saw a song (Percy Sledge’s ‘My Special Prayer’) make more than 16 weeks on the charts. ‘Time Is Tight’ would be Booker T & The MG’s only SA chart it and as it had been the oldest on last week’s chart, we now had to look to The Archies’ ‘Sugar Sugar’ on 15 weeks for the new oldest.

Elvis returned to the charts with his 6th hit to date, ‘Suspicious Minds’. The song was his 109th US hot 100 hit and it would spend a week at the top spot there. It would just miss out on topping the UK charts, sitting at number 2 for 1 week while Rolf Harris was at 1 with ‘Two Little Boys’. The song was written by Mark James and would be his first SA Chart hit as song writer. Covers of the song would chart on both sides of the Atlantic with Dee Dee Warwick’s version going to 80 on the US charts in 1971 while in the UK Candi Staton went to 31 in 1982 and The Fine Young Cannibals went to 8 in 1986 with their respective covers.

The Equals returned to the charts for a 3rd outing. Their new one was ‘Viva Bobby Joe’. Like their previous 2 hits, it was written by band member Eddy Grant. It would be their 6th UK chart hit, going to number 6 there, returning the band to the top 10 for only their second time. They had had 3 hits which did not make the top 30 between ‘Viva Bobby Joe’ and their previous top 10 hit, ‘Baby Come Back’ which went to number 1.

The Bee Gees ticked over to 88 weeks in the charts and this moved them up to tied 5th on the weeks count list, sitting alongside The Beach Boys. The Archies meanwhile passed a landmark on the points front as they moved into the 500s for points, their 2 on the charts ticking them over to a total of 513.

This week also saw the second occasion where we had 2 acts having songs in adjacent positions. The Archies were at 6 and 7 with ‘Sugar Sugar’ and ‘La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down’ and Creedence Clear water Revival’s ‘Bad Moon Rising’ and ‘Green River’ were at 16 and 17 respectively. The last time we had 2 acts having hits in adjacent positions was on 30 December 1966 where Tommy Roe and Donovan both had songs sitting next to each other on the charts.

Youtube playlist:

10 October 1969

put_a_little_love_jackie_deshannon

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 5 Put a Little Love in Your Heart  – Jackie DeShannon
2 1 8 Saved by the Bell  – Robin Gibb
3 12 3 Soul Deep  – Box Tops
4 3 7 Make Me an Island  – Joe Dolan
5 5 8 Baby Make it Soon  – Marmalade
6 4 14 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
7 8 13 Turn Around  – Ken J. Larkin
8 7 5 Conversations  – Cilla Black
9 10 4 Sing a Rainbow/Love is Blue  – Dells
10 6 12 Bad Moon Rising  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
11 14 4 Katrina’s Theme  – Jill Kirkland
12 18 2 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
13 New 1 Don’t Forget to Remember  – Bee Gees
14 19 2 A Boy Named Sue  – Johnny Cash
15 17 15 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
16 9 16 Time is Tight  – Booker T & The MG’s
17 15 4 Abergavenny  – Quentin E. Klopjaeger
18 New 1 Sweet Caroline  – Neil Diamond
19 20 2 Green River  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
20 New 1 Hold on to What You’ve Got  – Staccatos

Jackie DeShannon’s ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’ became the 9th song by a solo female artists to top our charts (10th if you include ‘Something’ Stupid’, Nancy Sinatra’s ‘chart topper with her father Frank). DeShannon ousted Robin Gibb’s ‘Saved By The Bell’ from the number 1 spot after the latter had been there for 3 weeks. Gibb dropped to number 2.

The Box Tops followed up last week’s biggest climber with another one this week as ‘Soul Deep’ moved up 9 places from 12 to 3. ‘Soul Deep’ was now the 3rd song to make a record to date climb of 17 places in the space of 2 weeks. This had previously been achieved by The Monkees’ ‘Daydream Believer’ and Herman’s Hermits’ ‘My Sentimental Friend’.

The Archies picked up a 5th star rater with a 6 place climb by ‘La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down’ while Johnny Cash’s ‘A Boy Named Sue’ gave him his first with a 5 place climb. The 2 songs sat at 12 and 14 respectively.

Booker T & The MG’s ‘Time Is Tight’ accounted for the 12th time the biggest faller in the week was an instrumental. It was the 3rd such hit to pick up the award twice with Roger Williams’ ‘Lara’s Theme (From Dr Zhivago)’ and ‘Love Is Blue’ by The Paul Mauriat Orchestra also managing this. ‘Time Is Tight’ was still the oldest on the chart and had been so for 8 weeks now which equalled the longest period as oldest on the chart by an instrumental that the aforementioned Roger Williams hit had managed.

Jack fell off the charts and Jill came tumbling after as Tommy Roe’s ‘Jack And Jill’ left the top 20 after 5 weeks with us. It peaked at 10 and kept up Roe’s 100% record of his hits going top 10 as all 6 of them had done so. ‘Jack And Jill’s peak of 10 was his lowest peak to date.

Family Dogg’s ‘Way Of Life’ which had entered the charts the same week as Roe’s ‘Jack And Jill’, also left the charts this week. Those alert ones among you will work out that ‘Way Of Life’ spent 5 weeks on the charts, however, it peaked 3 places lower than ‘Jack And Jill’, only getting to number 13.

Last to go was Oliver’s ‘Good Morning Starshine’ which lasted 8 weeks and peaked at 6. This was the last we saw of the songs from the musical ‘Hair’ on the charts. We had seen 3 in total, ‘Good Morning Starshine’, 5th Dimensions ‘Aquarius/Let The Sunshine In’ and The Cowsills’ ‘Hair’.  All 3 songs had spent 8 weeks in the charts (totalling 24) with ‘Aquarius/Let The Sunshine In’ having the highest peak of 3 while the other 2 songs got to 6.

The last time The Bee Gees’ entered the charts at lucky 13, the song (‘I’ve Gotta get A Message to You’) went on to top the charts. So this week when ‘Don’t Forget To Remember’ started its chart career at lucky 13, the band would have been hoping for the same result. This was their 10th hit to chart so far and this placed them 1 behind Cliff Richard and 2 behind leader for number of hits, Tom Jones who was on 12. The Hollies and Herman’s Hermits, also on 10, shared 3rd place with The Bee Gees. The band was still without Robin and Peter Mason was brought in to add harmonies to the song, however, the vocals tracks he laid down were not used in the final version. The song fared well globally, going to the top of the charts in Denmark, Ireland, Holland, New Zealand and what was then Rhodesia. Barry co-wrote the song with Maurice and Barry now equalled 2nd placed song writer for number of hits Barry Mason as both sat on lucky 13 hits with Les Reed on 14 leading the way.

Also moving up the number of hits by a song writer list was Neil Diamond. He had writing credit on Cliff Richard’s ‘Just Another Guy’, and The Monkees’ ‘I’m A Believer’ and ‘A Little Bit Of Me, A little Bit Of You’. This week we saw the first time where Diamond had song writing credits as well as being credited as the artist. His new hit was ‘Sweet Caroline’ which although it was his first SA hit as an artist, was his 14th US Hot 100 hit where it went to number 4, his 2nd to reach the top 10 there. But we shouldn’t berate ourselves too much in being slow on picking up on his as the British would not have him in their charts until November 1970 and ‘Sweet Caroline’ would only chart there in 1971 where it would peak at 8.

The Staccatos’ ‘Hold On To What You’ve Got’ was the final new entry this week. The band became the 3rd local act and 33rd overall to have 2 or more in the charts in the same week as ‘Cry To Me’ by them was sitting at 15. ‘Hold On To What You’ve Got’ was a cover of a 1964 hit by Joe Tex. Tex penned the song and saw it go to number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. It was The Staccatos’ 6th hit to date and they sat tied second for hit count for local acts joining Virginia Lee and Gene Rockwell just behind leaders Four Jacks & A Jill who were on 7. The local hit count was now up to 5, a total we had not seen since 27 September 1968 (over a year previous) when there were 6.

On the weeks count list, The Staccatos moved into 17th place, their 2 in the chart this week helping them jump to 55. They also closed the gap between themselves in 2nd place on the local list and Four Jacks & A Jill who topped the list, the difference now down to 14 weeks. Billy Forrest moved 1 clear of Dickie Loader, his 24 to date giving him 8th place to himself on the local list while Loader dropped to 9th.

‘Love Is Blue’ pulled 1 week clear of ‘Ramblin Boy’ for weeks by a song charting in more than 1 version. It now sat 6th on its own while ‘Ramblin’ Boy’ dropped to 7th.

A final thing to note on this chart was that while the US acts overtook the UK acts for number of hits a few weeks back, they had lagged behind for total weeks spent on the chart. This week the US acts overtook the UK acts for weeks in the chart with hits by US acts having a combined total of 1,787 weeks compared to the 1,784 that the UK acts had accumulated.

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3 October 1969

saved_by_the_bell_robin_gibb

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 Saved by the Bell  – Robin Gibb
2 7 4 Put a Little Love in Your Heart  – Jackie DeShannon
3 4 6 Make Me an Island  – Joe Dolan
4 2 13 Sugar, Sugar  – Archies
5 3 7 Baby Make it Soon  – Marmalade
6 5 11 Bad Moon Rising  – Creedence Clearwater Revival
7 8 4 Conversations  – Cilla Black
8 11 12 Turn Around  – Ken J. Larkin
9 9 15 Time is Tight  – Booker T & The MG’s
10 17 3 Sing a Rainbow/Love is Blue  – Dells
11 6 8 Good Morning Starshine  – Oliver
12 20 2 Soul Deep  – Box Tops
13 14 5 Way of Life  – Family Dogg
14 15 3 Katrina’s Theme  – Jill Kirkland
15 16 3 Abergavenny  – Quentin E. Klopjaeger
16 10 5 Jack and Jill  – Tommy Roe
17 19 14 Cry to Me  – Staccatos
18 New 1 La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down  – Archies
19 New 1 A Boy Named Sue  – Johnny Cash
20 New 1 Green River  – Creedence Clearwater Revival

It was now 3 weeks in a row at 1 for Robin Gibb’s ‘Saved By The Bell’. However, it was suddenly under some pressure as Jackie Deshannon’s ‘Put A Little Love In Your Heart’ made a star rater leap of 5 places to number 2 and Joe Dolan’s ‘Make Me An Island’, which had been at number 2 before, made a bit of a recovery and moved back up 1 to 3.

The Box Tops picked up their 2nd biggest climber award with ‘Soul Deep’ moving up 8 places from 20 to 12. This was the biggest climb for a Box Top song so far,

Apart from the biggest climber and Jackie DeShannon’s star rater climb mentioned above, there was 1 other song that moved up 4 or more places and that was The Dells’ ‘Sing A Rainbow/Love Is Blue’ which climbed 7 from 17 to 10.

Tommy Roe’s ‘Jack And Jill’ fell down the charts, dropping 6 places from 10 to 16. This was Roe’s 2nd time with a biggest faller.

Booker T & The MG’s ‘Time Is Tight’ enjoyed a 7th week as the oldest and was now 1 week off equalling the record longest run as the oldest by an instrumental which Roger Williams’ ‘Lara’s Theme (From Dr Zhivago)’ held. The overall record to date for any song was 12 weeks which Tommy Roe’s ‘Sweet Pea’ had managed.

Tony Joe White’s ‘Polk Salad Annie’ became the 18th song to spend just 1 week on the chart, leaving the top 20 this week after being a new entry at 18 last week. White was the 7th act of these 18 songs where this would be their only week spent on our charts.

The first line of the song ‘Spinning Wheel’ by Blood, Sweat & Tears goes ‘What goes up/must come down’ and that was what the song did as it moved down so much it fell off the top 20. It had been with us for just 3 weeks and reached number 13 during this time. It was the 3rd highest peak for a song lasting just 3 weeks in the charts and second highest if one ignores Emil Dean’s ‘Key To Your Heart’ which was at 3 on the very first chart and lasted just 2 weeks after that. Trini Lopez’ peak of 12 with ‘Master Jack’ was the other ‘3 weeker’ song to have a higher peak.

Last to leave was Paul Revere & The Raiders’ ‘Let Me’ which lasted 7 weeks and peaked at 8. This would be their only SA chart hit, but as mentioned a few weeks back, band member Mark Lindsay would return with a solo hit.

The Archies became the 32nd act to have 2 or more hits in the chart in the same week as ‘La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down’ joined ‘Sugar Sugar’ in the top 20. This was the first of their 4 SA hits to date that did not make the charts in the US. The song came from their 1st album simply entitled ‘The Archies’. The album made it to 88 on the US album charts. ‘La-Dee-Doo-Down-Down’ was written by Jeff Barry. He had had writing credits on all 4 of The Archies hits so far, 2 of which he had shared credits with Andy Kim. This was his 7th hit as a song writer and he sat tied 9th on the hits count list for song writers.

Country legend Johnny Cash made his SA chart debut this week with ‘A Boy Named Sue’ arriving at number 19. The song was the first of 4 that would have Shel Silverstein included in the writing credits. The song would top the country singles charts in the US and Canada and peaked at 2 and 3 respectively on the main charts in those countries. It would be Cash’s only top 10 hit in the US where he had over 40 songs reach the top 100. Elsewhere it would go to 3 in Ireland, 4 in the UK, 9 in what was then Rhodesia and 13 in Holland.

The Archies were not the only act seeing 2 in the charts as Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Green River’ joined ‘Bad Moon Rising’ in the top 20. This was their 2nd pairing of songs to be in the charts simultaneously as ‘Bad Moon Rising’ had arrived while ‘Proud Mary’ was still around. Creedence were the 11th act so far to have seen 2 different pairings of songs in the chart at the same time. This 11 included 4 who had seen 3 different pairings. As with the previous 2 hits for the band, ‘Green River’ was penned by John Fogerty and it also reached number 2 in the US, like the previous 2 hits. In the UK it managed to get to number 19. Fogerty apparently got the title of the song from a soda pop syrup flavour called ‘Green River’. (Is that a type of drink for algae-holics?)

As the songs leaving us were by 2 US groups and a US male solo artist and the 3 new entries were also by 2 US groups and a US male solo artist, the make up of the top 20 was unchanged for nationality and for artist type. It did mean though that the Americans moved 7 ahead of the British for total hit count to date as they were now on 218 compared to the Brits’ 211.

There were no milestones to celebrate in terms of total weeks count, but Creedence were enjoying their 20th consecutive week with at least 1 hit on the chart.

Tommy Roe pulled 1 week clear of Cliff Richard and The Seekers, and now had 13th place on the weeks count list to himself while the latter 2 dropped to 14th. The Staccatos re-entered the top 20 of the overall list, their 53 weeks putting them tied 19th with The Tremeloes. On the local list they were unmoved in second place, still 14 weeks behind the 67 that Four Jacks & A Jill had accumulated. Billy Forrest moved 1 week clear of Dickie Loader and his 24 to date placed him in 8th place on his own on the local list while Loader dropped to 9th. All of Forrest’s weeks had come so far under the guise of Quentin E. Klopjaeger.

‘Love Is Blue’ moved tied 6th with ‘The Letter’ for weeks on the chart by songs charting in more than 1 version. It had now clocked up a total of 23 weeks between the 4 versions of the song that had charted.

The average number of weeks the songs in the top 20 had been with us moved above 6 for the first time in 33 weeks. This figure was boosted by the fact that The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ was in a second run on the charts and brought a week count of 12 from its previous run. Without those added 12 from the previous run, the average would have been 5.65.

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