1970 THE FACTS AND FIGURES

chris-andrews_pretty_belinda

That is now the first year of the new decade done and all that is left is to wrap up the year with the usual who managed to do what and how summary.

We had 141 songs spend at least 1 week in the chart during the year. This was down on 1969’s record to date of 153 hits and in fact was the 3rd lowest we had seen to date with only 1965 (which was half a year) and 1966 seeing less songs chart. These 141 songs were brought to us by 114 different artists (duets and collaborations counting as 2, the figure would be 112 if these counted as 1). 1970 saw the lowest hits per act ratio with the 114 acts seeing on average only 1.24 hits each. This compared to the high to date of 1967 which saw the acts averaging 1.49 hits each. The table below sets out the comparative figures for these stats by year:

Year No Of Hits No Of Acts Hits/Acts Ratio
1965 79 55 1.44
1966 136 97 1.40
1967 146 98 1.49
1968 142 97 1.46
1969 153 112 1.37
1970 141 114 1.24

While the overall number of hits was one of the lowest to date, the locals had a good year seeing 28 of their hits chart. This was the second highest total we had seen in a year with only the 30 we saw in 1966 being higher. There were 24 acts who brought us these hits (22 if you don’t split out the duets).

TOP HITS

Based on a points system of 20 points for a number 1 position, 19 for number 2 etc down to 1 for position 20, the following are the top 40 chart performers for the year (Note: this does not reflect sales):

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Pretty Belinda Chris Andrews 268
2 Love Is A Beautiful Song Dave Mills 256
3 In The Summertime Mungo Jerry 236
4 Ma Belle Amie Tee Set 231
5 Carol Ok Chris Andrews 218
6 Come Softly To Me Percy Sledge 215
7 Burning Bridges Mike Curb Congregation 206
8 The Wedding Jody Wayne 205
9 Bridge Over Troubled Water Simon & Garfunkel 186
10 Yellow River Christie 178
11 Spider Spider Tidal Wave 176
12 Cracklin’ Rosie Neil Diamond 173
13 Cha-La-La, I Need You Shuffles 167
=14 Lola Kinks 165
=14 Hitchin’ A Ride Vanity Fare 165
16 Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head B.J. Thomas 164
17 Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes) Edison Lighthouse 162
18 Brown Eyes Chris Andrews 160
=19 Daughter Of Darkness Tom Jones 154
=19 Which Way You Goin’ Billy? Poppy Family 154
=20 Venus Shocking Blue 153
=20 Mademoiselle Ninette Michael Holm 153
23 Working On A Good Thing Outlet 151
24 Without Love Tom Jones 149
25 Neanderthal Man Hotlegs 145
26 Travellin’ Band Creedence Clearwater Revival 143
27 Theresa Dave Mills 142
28 Holly Holy Neil Diamond 137
=29 (Call Me) Number One Tremeloes 135
=29 Tchaikovsky One Omega Limited 135
31 All I Have To Do Is Dream Bobbie Gentry & Glen Campbell 127
32 Jam Up Jelly Tight Tommy Roe 124
33 Knock Knock Who’s There Mary Hopkin 121
34 Keep On Smiling James Lloyd 117
=35 A Song Of Joy Miguel Rios 116
=35 Cotton Fields (The Cotton Song) Beach Boys 116
37 Looky Looky Giorgio 115
38 All The Tears In The World Dave Mills 110
39 Don’t Cry Daddy Elvis Presley 109
40 I Don’t Believe In If Anymore Roger Whittaker 106

You can compare this to the list published in Top 40 magazine in 1989 which can be found here:

Top 40 Magazine 1970 List

Chris Andrews’ ‘Pretty Belinda’ was the first song by a British act to be the song of the year based on this points system. Before this we had seen 3 local songs take the honour and 2 American acts do so. The 268 points ‘Pretty Belinda’ made was the 4th highest for the top song of the year that we had seen in the 6 years of charts so far and overall it was the 6th highest total a song had managed in a calendar year (it earned an additional 16 points in 1969).

The cumulative points to date gave the following top 10:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Cry To Me Staccatos 342
2 Timothy Four Jacks & A Jill 312
3 Sweet Pea Tommy Roe 307
4 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
5 Master Jack Four Jacks & A Jill 295
6 Green Green Grass Of Home Tom Jones 289
7 California Girls Beach Boys 286
8 Pretty Belinda Chris Andrews 284
=9 Theresa Dave Mills 279
=9 Sunglasses Hilary 279

The top songs pointswise on the local front for 1970 were as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Love Is A Beautiful Song Dave Mills 256
2 The Wedding Jody Wayne 205
3 Spider Spider Tidal Wave 176
4 Working On A Good Thing Outlet 151
5 Theresa Dave Mills 142

And cumulatively from the start of the charts in 1965:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Cry To Me Staccatos 342
2 Timothy Four Jacks & A Jill 312
3 Master Jack Four Jacks & A Jill 295
=4 Sunglasses Hilary 279
=4 Theresa Dave Mills 279

NUMBER OF HITS

There were 3 acts which managed to spend at least 1 week in the chart with 4 different hits during the year and they were Creedence Clearwater Revival, The Archies and Chris Andrews. This was 1 less than the record to date of 5 hits in a year which Englbert Humperdinck, The Bee Gees (twice), The Archies and Percy Sledge had managed.

Overall Tom Jones led the way for total hit count with 15 hits to date. He was followed by Cliff Richard on 13 and The Hollies on 12.

For the local acts it was Dave Mills who had the best year, seeing 3 of his hits spend time in the charts. He was the 4th local act to manage at least 3 in a year with Gene Rockwell and Murray Campbell managing this in 1965 and then Four Jacks & A Jill managed a record to date for a local act of 4 in 1968. Cumulatively Four Jacks & A Jill led the way for the locals with 7 hits to their name. Virginia Lee, The Staccatos, The Bats and Gene Rockwell all sat behind them on 6.

WEEKS ON THE CHARTS

Last year The Archies set a new record for weeks in the charts, clocking up 47 (2 in the chart in the same week counts as 2). This year Chris Andrews went 1 better by managing 48 and was the clear winner, being 10 weeks ahead of second placed Dave Mill who managed 38. Creedence Clearwater Revival on 35 came in 3rd. Last year Creedence had been tied second with The Bee Gees. Being second overall meant that Dave Mills was the top local act. He was a good way ahead of second placed local, Jody Wayne who managed 21. Tidal Wave with 16 were 3rd. Mills’ 38 weeks equalled the record to date for a local act which Four Jacks & A Jill had managed.

Overall it was still Tom Jones who led the way for weeks having clocked up a total of 165 since the charts began. Percy Sledge sat second with 102 and The Troggs were 3rd with 101. Looking at the local acts it was The Staccatos who led the way with 83 followed by Four Jacks & A Jill on 68 and Dave Mills on 48

NUMBER 1’s

So far the best any act had managed was to see 2 songs spend time at number 1 during the year, but 1970 saw Chris Andrews become the first act to have 3 number 1s in a year as ‘Pretty Belinda’, ‘Carol OK’ and ‘Brown Eyes’ all enjoyed time at the top. Andrews was also the only act to have had more than 1 chart topper this year and he set a new record for weeks at 1 in a calendar year as his 3 chart toppers spent a total of 9 weeks there. The next best we had seen in a year was 7.

1970 was the second best year for local number 1s as we saw 3 local songs go to number 1. These were Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’, Tidal Wave’s ‘Spider Spider’ and Jody Wayne’s ‘The Wedding’.

There were 3 songs which shared the honours for most weeks spent at 1 during the year and these were Chris Andrews’ ‘Pretty Belinda’, The Mike Curb Congregations’ ‘Burning Bridges’ and Mungo Jerry’s ‘In The Summertime’ which all spent 5 weeks at the top of the charts. The record to date was 7 weeks at the top which 2 songs had managed in a calendar year (Hilary’s’ Sunglasses’ and The Tremeloes’ ‘Silence Is Golden’) and 1 song had managed in total but straddling a year end (‘Massachusetts’ by The Bee Gees). Of the 3 local songs that topped the charts, Dave Mills’ 4 weeks with ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ took top honours with ‘The Wedding’ by Jody Wayne managing 3 in a broken run. ‘Spider Spider’ only managed 1 week.

Tom Jones still led the way for most chart toppers. He added 1 this year to the 5 he had amassed in previous years to bring his total to 6. Chris Andrews was in second place with 4 to his name and he was followed by The Troggs, The Tremloes, Elvis Presley, The Bee Gees and The Rolling Stones who were all on 3. Four Jacks And A Jill, who had seen 2 chart toppers, were still the only local act to have achieved more than 1.

In terms of weeks spent at number 1, it was unsurprisingly Tom Jones who led the way. He had spent a total of 18 weeks at the top spot. Second highest was The Bee Gees who were on 14 and these top 2 were unchanged from the end of 1969. Third spot did change as Chris Andrews’ 13 weeks at 1 put him ahead of The Troggs and Elvis Presley who were 3rd at the end of 1969. There was no change for the locals with Four Jacks & A Jill and Hillary on 7 weeks still leading the way.

FEMALE ACTS

Last year saw the worst performance by the ladies since 1965, the first year of the charts, with them bringing us only 8 hits (9 if you include their involvement in duets). This year they fared no better, once again seeing 8 hits, a figure which goes up to 9 when duets were added in. Both totals matched that of 1969. The female artists’ best year to date was 1967 when they brought us 23 hits.

The only woman to manage more than 1 hit this year was Bobbie Gentry who did so with 1 solo hit and 1 as part of a duet with Glen Campbell. Petula Clark’s 4 in 1967 was still the best to date. Barbara Ray and Wanda Arletti were the only local ladies to chart.

Petula Clark still led the way for hits to date by woman with 10 to her name. This placed her 6th overall. Virginia Lee and Nancy Sinatra were still in second position with 6 hits each to their names with Virginia leading the way for local lasses. Judy Page on 3 was the second highest local woman.

Only 2 women managed to clock up 10 or more weeks in the year and they were Bobbie Gentry with 12 and Barbara Ray with 10. This was the lowest total for the top woman in a year with the best effort being Petula Clark’s 37 in 1967. Barbara Ray was obviously the top local woman with Wanda Arletti the second local and coming in tied 5th overall for woman with 5 weeks.

To date Petula Clark led the way for women with 71 weeks to her name. Sandie Shaw was second with 54 and Lucille Starr 3rd with 53. This top 3 was unchanged from the end of 1969. Virginia Lee still led the way for local ladies with 36 weeks while Hillary and Carike Keuzenkamp sat tied second with 22 to their names.

This year was the first time we did not see a woman top the charts. 1968 had seen 2 manage it and the best year to date was 1967 when 5 women saw their hits go to number 1. All the other years saw just 1 female chart topper. We were still to see a woman top the charts more than once other than Nancy Sinatra who had managed it once as a solo artist and once as part of a duet with her dad, Frank. Hilary’s 7 weeks at the top of the charts with ‘Sunglasses’ was still the most number of weeks a woman had spent at 1.

The top 5 hits by woman in 1970 based on the points system were:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Knock Knock Who’S There Mary Hopkin 121
2 All Kinds Of Everything Dana 82
3 Zanzibar Wanda Arletti 59
4 Band Of Gold Freda Payne 40
5 Ruby Tuesday Melanie 27

On a cumulative basis, the top 5 was unchanged from last year and read:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Single Girl Sandy Posey 302
2 Sunglasses Hilary 279
3 Timothy Carike Keuzenkamp 236
4 Cry Softly (Liebestraum) Nancy Ames 232
5 The French Song Lucille Starr 223

NATIONALITIES

Aside from artists from the UK and US (who tend to dominate most charts worldwide), and local acts the following are the top hits from other nationalities:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 Ma Belle Amie Tee Set 231 Netherlands
2 Cha-La-La, I Need You Shuffles 167 Netherlands
3 Which Way You Goin’ Billy? Poppy Family 154 Canada
=4 Venus Shocking Blue 153 Netherlands
=4 Mademoiselle Ninette Michael Holm 153 Germany

The Netherland had 3 of the top 5, a feat that the Australians had managed in 1966 and 1967 while Canada were the only other nation that had managed to take the top 2 on this list before when they did it in 1967. Tee Set’s feat in topping this list was the first time we saw a Dutch act do so. So far the Australians had topped this list twice and the Canadians, French and Irish each had 1 apiece.

1970 saw the highest number of songs by ‘Rest of the World’ artists as they accounted for 19. Their next best was 1969’s 13. There were 19 acts who brought us these 19 songs which meant that none of them had more than 1 hit.

The Americans had the most number of hits in the year for a 4th time as their 48 in 1970 was the highest. They were followed by the British on 46 and the locals on 28. Acts from Jamaica were the highest from the rest of the world with 6 to their name. They were followed by the Dutch (4) and the Canadians (3). Australia, Kenya, Spain and Italy all contributed 1. The 48 by the Americans was the second lowest winning total we had seen to date with 1965’s 36 being the only time the top figure was lower and that was only half a year.

To date we had seen 272 hits from the Americans, 258 from the British, 117 from South Africans, 16 from Canadians and 8 each from Australians and Jamaicans.

The cumulative best hits for ‘rest of the world’ artists was as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 Ma Belle Amie Tee Set 231 Netherlands
2 The French Song Lucille Starr 223 Canada
3 World Of Our Own Seekers 192 Australia
4 Love Is Blue Paul Mauriat Orchestra 186 France
5 Cha-La-La, I Need You Shuffles 167 Netherlands

WHAT DIDN’T CHART

There were 17 songs that topped the US or UK charts (or both) which did not make our charts. This was 1 less than 1969’s record to date of 18, however as 3 of those 18 did eventually chart in 1970, the figure for 1969 of songs UK/US chart toppers that would never make our top 20 was 15 while none of the 17 that did not make it in 1970 would ever make it.

The 17 chart toppers in the US or UK or both that didn’t make our charts were as follows:

Song Artist
Let It Be Beatles
The Long And Winding Road/For You Blue Beatles
Make It With You Bread
(They Long To Be) Close To You Carpenters
Ain’t No Mountain High Enough Diana Ross
War Edwin Starr
Back Home England World Cup Squad
American Woman Guess Who
ABC Jackson 5
I Want You Back Jackson 5
I’ll Be There Jackson 5
The Love You Save Jackson 5
Voodoo Chile Jimi Hendrix
Spirit In The Sky Norman Greenbaum
Everything Is Beautiful Ray Stevens
Thank You (Falettin Me Be Mice Elf Again)/Everybody Is A Star Sly & The Family Stone
The Tears Of A Clown Smokey Robinson & The Miracles

CHARTING IN CONSECUTIVE YEARS

We were down to just 5 acts who had spent at least 1 week in the charts in every year since 1965 and they were Cliff Richard, Herman’s Hermits, The Hollies, The Staccatos and Tom Jones. There were 2 acts who had charted in every year up to 1969 who did not manage to feature in the charts in 1970 and they were Donovan and Manfred Mann.

There had been 5 acts who had seen some chart action in every year from 1966 (the second year of the charts), but not 1 of them would feature in the charts in 1970, in fact only 1 would actually be seen in the top 20 again.

There were 4 acts who had features in every year’s charts from 1967 onwards and they were The Bee Gees, The Box Tops and The Tremeloes.

I WRITE THE SONGS

This year saw the second occasion where the total number of song writers credited on the songs that charted made it into the 200s and 1970 only just managed it as it as there were exactly 200 song writers who brought us the songs of 1970. The record to date was 206 which we saw in 1967.

Terry Dempsey was the one who brought us the most hits this year with 8 songs that he had song writing credits on spending time in the top 20 this year. This equalled the record to date for a calendar year which Barry Mason had set in 1968. Jeff Barry who shared the top spot in 1969 with Barry and Maurice Gibb was second place this year with 6. This was the same total he had when he topped the list in 1969.

Les Reed, who only managed 3 in 1970, still led the way overall with 17 to his name. Barry Mason was in second place with 15 while Geoff Stephens and Barry Gibb shared 3rd place with 13. Dempsey, who had only had 1 hit prior to this year, was sitting tied 10th overall.

Having the most songs chart usually meant that one also topped the most weeks in the chart list as well and this year was no exception as Terry Dempsey’s 8 hits gave him the top total weeks for a song writer in the year as he clocked up 69. This also beat the previous record of 63 for a calendar year which Barry Mason had managed in 1968. Chris Andrews was second in 1970 with 49 weeks to his name as song writer.

Overall Les Reed still led the way for weeks in the chart as he had managed 160. The second and third placed song writers at the end of 1969 swapped places as Barry Mason moved up to second from 3rd, he had 139 weeks to his name while Barry Gibb, who had been second, dropped to 3rd with 125 weeks. Dempsey’s effort in 1970 moved him into 9th place overall.

Chris Andrews’ was the only song writer to see 3 of his compositions go to number 1 and they were the same 3 that he topped the charts with as an artist. The only other song writer to see more than 1 chart topper this year was Terry Demspey who had writing credits on Dave Mills’ ‘Love Is A Beautiful Song’ and Tidal Wave’s ‘Spider Spider’. There were now 6 song writers sitting on 4 number 1s to date and they were Les Reed, Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Chris Andrews and Geoff Stephens.

Chris Andrews was the song writer to spend the most weeks at 1 as he managed 9. Terry Dempsey, Ray Dorset and Lalo Schifrin were all second with 5 weeks. Dorset had penned Mungo Jerry’s ‘In The Summertime’ while Schifrin gave us The Mike Curb Congregations’ ‘Burning Bridges’.

There was no change to the top 3 song writers for total weeks spent at number 1 as Barry and Maurice Gibb shared the top spot on 15 weeks with their brother Robin sitting just behind them on 14. Chris Andrews moved up into 4th place with 13.

THANKS

Finally, I would like to thank all those who have helped by noting corrections etc as we have gone through 1970. Special thanks go to Peet van Staaden, Anton van Staaden and Ian McLean for supplying invaluable information and corrections as well as Chris Kimberly, Brian Currin, Stephen Segerman and Tertius Louw for being my go-to guys when I’m stumped.

And so we venture further into the 70s. 1971 up next.

25 December 1970

looky_looky_giorgio

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
2 2 10 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
3 4 7 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
4 6 5 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
5 3 7 Paranoid  – Black Sabbath
6 5 7 Woodstock  – Matthews Southern Comfort
7 8 4 You Can Get it if You Really Want  – Desmond Dekker
8 7 5 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews
9 12 13 Burning Bridges  – Mike Curb Congregation
10 9 13 Cha-La-La, I Need You  – Shuffles
11 15 3 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
12 16 3 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
13 20 2 I Hear You Knockin’  – Dave Edmunds
14 13 11 All the Tears in the World  – Dave Mills
15 10 4 Ruby Tuesday  – Melanie
16 14 9 Black Night  – Deep Purple
17 New 1 San Bernadino  – Christie
18 New 1 See Me, Feel Me  – Who
19 19 2 Sacha  – Eric Smith Movement
20 11 7 Band of Gold  – Freda Payne

Our final chart of 1970 saw Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ hold on to the number 1 spot, giving it 2 weeks at 1 so far. The previous chart topper, Neil Diamond’s ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’, was unmoved at 2 and was the first song to spend 2 weeks at number 2 both before and after reching the top spot.

Dave Edmunds’ ‘I Hear You Knockin’ was the climber of the week as it moved up 7 places from 20 to land at 13. To date 7 was the 3rd most popular number of places to climb to be the biggest climber in the week. We had seen a biggest climber of 6 places 59 times and a 5 place climb be the biggest 50 times while a 7 place climb had taken the biggest climber award 48 times. The average of the biggest climbs to date was 6.7 places.

Also moving up were The Dealians’ ‘Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow’ and The Partridge Family’s ‘I Think I Love You’ which both made star rater climbs of 4 places to land at 11 and 12 respectively. They were the only other star raters this week.

Freda Payne’s ‘Band Of Gold’ took the faller of the week award as it fell 9 places from 11 to 20. This was the 12th song to have a fall of 9 places in a week with a further 7 having a record to date fall of 10 places.

Both of the songs that left the charts this week were by local acts. The first of which was Barbara Ray & the 5th Association’s ‘Like I Do’ which lasted 10 weeks and peaked at 4. This was the first of many Barbara Ray hits to grace our charts.

It appeared that South Africans suffered more from ophidiophobia than they did from arachnophobia as Tidal Wave’s ‘Green Mamba’ fell off the charts after just 4 weeks and a peak of 16. This was 8 weeks less and 15 places lower than the weeks and peak of their only other hit to date, ‘Spider Spider’. For those still wondering, ophidiophobia is a fear of snakes and arachnophobia a fear of spiders. The upside for the South African record buying public was that the next couple of hits by Tidal Wave would be fruity and economic, which are far more friendly topics.

Christie’s second SA chart hit was the first of the new entries this week. Like its predecessor, ‘Yellow River’, ‘San Bernadino’ was written by Jeff Christie. The song managed to get to number 1 in Germany, 7 in the UK and just scraped a Hot 100 placing in the US, spending just 1 week at number 100. According to Wikipedia, it would also make it to number 2 in Vietnam of all places.

The other new entry was The Who’s ‘See Me, Feel Me’, their 4th hit to date. The song was taken from their Rock Opera ‘Tommy’ and would be their 12th US Hot 100 hit which would peak at 12 (a 12 theme going on there). Despite having a UK release it would not chart there. The band performed the song live at the closing ceremony of the 2012 Olympics in London.

With the 2 songs leaving the chart being local and the 2 new entries being by British acts, we had a complete change in the national make up of the chart. Last week saw locals acts having the most hits on the top 20 with the Americans and Brits being tied 2nd. This week the Brits led the way with the Americans second and the locals relegated to 3rd.

The 2 oldest on last week’s  chart, The Shuffles’ ‘Cha-La-La I Need You’ and The Mike Curb Congregation’s ‘Burning Bridges’ continued their respective runs in the top 20 as they both ticked over to 13 weeks with us.

The gap between the total number of hits to date by American acts and those by British acts dropped to 14. This rounded the year off nicely as the last time the gap had been this low was in the first week on 1970 with the gap getting as big as 23 hits during the year. We had now seen a total of 272 hits by Americans and 258 by British acts to date. The locals were in 3rd place with 117.

Chris Andrews sat 15th on the weeks count list, his 75 to date failing to move him up, but as he moved 1 week clear of Creedence Clearwater Revival, he no longer shared the position with them. Andrews still had a fair bit of work to do if he wanted to get back to number 10 on that list which was the highest placing he had had on it so far.

The average weeks the top 20 songs had been in the charts moved back above 6 after having been below this threshold for the past 10 weeks. It sat on 6.1.

There were only 2 acts who featured on the first and last chart of the year and they were Chris Andrews and Dave Mills. Andrews’ ‘Pretty Belinda’ and Mills ‘Theresa’ were the hits they opened the year with. This was the lowest number of acts whom we had seen open and close the year with a hit in the top 20. The previous 5 years (including being on the 1st ever chart in June 1965) had seen either 4 or 5 acts feature in the charts at the start and end of the year.

Youtube playlist:

18 December 1970

looky_looky_giorgio

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 7 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
2 1 9 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
3 4 6 Paranoid  – Black Sabbath
4 5 6 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
5 3 6 Woodstock  – Matthews Southern Comfort
6 7 4 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
7 8 4 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews
8 17 3 You Can Get it if You Really Want  – Desmond Dekker
9 6 12 Cha-La-La, I Need You  – Shuffles
10 13 3 Ruby Tuesday  – Melanie
11 12 6 Band of Gold  – Freda Payne
12 9 12 Burning Bridges  – Mike Curb Congregation
13 10 10 All the Tears in the World  – Dave Mills
14 11 8 Black Night  – Deep Purple
15 18 2 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
16 19 2 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
17 16 4 Green Mamba  – Tidal Wave
18 14 10 Like I Do  – Barbara Ray & 5th Association
19 New 1 Sacha  – Eric Smith Movement
20 New 1 I Hear You Knockin’  – Dave Edmunds

Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ became the first of only 2 songs by an Italian act that would top our charts as it captured the number 1 spot from Neil Diamond’s ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’. The latter, which had enjoyed a run of 4 weeks at 1, fell into second place.

Although Desmond Dekker had been the only Jamaican act to have had more than 1 hit so far and was enjoying his 3rd to date, it was only Boris Gardiner of the Jamaicans who had charted so far who had manged more than 1 biggest climber. This week Desmond righted that imbalance as ‘You Can Get It If You really Want’ took the honours this week and added to the time ‘Israelites’ took the honour, Dekker joined Gardiner on 2 biggest climbers. ‘You Can Get It If You Really Want’ moved up 9 places from 17 to 8 which was the biggest climb a song by a Jamaican act had managed to date, but this record would be broken by the time the charts ended. The next biggest climb in the charts was only 3 places so this made Dekker’s hit the only star rater this week. This was the 8th time we had seen a difference of 6 places between the biggest climber in the week and the next highest. We had also seen 7 occasions where the difference had been greater than 6 places with the record to date being 10 which we had seen twice.

Barbara Ray & The 5th Association’s ‘Like I Do’ collected a second biggest faller award as it dropped 4 places from 14 to 18 this week.

The Shuffles’ ‘Cha-La-La, I Need You’ and The Mike Curb Congregation’s ‘Burning Bridges’ both continued as the oldest on the chart as they moved on to 12 weeks with us.

We said goodbye to Jody Wayne’s ‘A Time for Us (Love Theme From “Romeo & Juliet”)’ and its time with us was 6 weeks during which time it peaked at 12, his tied second lowest weeks count to date and second lowest peak. The good news for Wayne was that we were far from finished with seeing him on our charts.

Dawn’s ‘Candida’ was the only other song to depart the chart this week. It lasted 10 weeks with us and peaked at 3. To date 265 songs of the 703 (37.7%) that had grace our charts had managed to get into double figures for weeks. Like Jody Waye, Dawn would be back.

Despite Jody Wayne leaving the charts, the local hit count was maintained at 6 and that was thanks to the Eric Smith Movement who brought us the first of the 2 new entries. ‘Sacha’ was the 24th instrumental to reach the top 20 and the 4th by a local act to do so. The song was recorded by a 35 piece orchestra on the countries first ever 8 track recording machine (bet you feel that your life has been enriched by that bit of trivia) and was the 3rd song that David Gresham ever produced. Both of Gresham’s previous production efforts had made our charts with Sean Rennie’s ‘’I’ll Walk With You’ going to 13 and Sam Evans’ ‘Ain’t Love A Funny Thing’ making it to 6. Eric Smith composed the music for a number of local films including ‘Die Lewe Sonder Jou’ and ‘Siener In Die Suburbs’, the latter starred Marius Weyers and Sandra Prinsloo. ‘Sacha’ was written by Jerry Lordan, Roger Cook and Roger Greenway giving Lordan his 3 SA chart hit to date and the 2 Rogers their 8th each. ‘Sacha’ appears to have been first recorded by Hank Marvin of The Shadows in 1969.

The other new entry was Dave Edmunds’ version of a song first recorded in 1955. ‘I Hear You Knockin’ was written by Dave Bartholomew and Earl King and was originally recorded by a guy called Smiley Lewis. That same year Fats Domino took a version to number 67 in the US while Gale Storm took the song to its highest US placing to date as she went to number 2 with it. Edmunds’ version manged to get to number 4 in the US. In the UK it was a different story with Edmunds’ cover being the only one to chart there so far. It made it to number 1, enjoying a 6 week run at the top, while keeping none other than Jimi Hendrix’s ‘Voodoo Chile’ from reaching number 1.

With 6 local songs on the chart and acts from The US and The UK only contributing 5 each, this was the 4th time we had seen the locals outdoing the Americans and the Brits. Canada, Italy, Jamaica and the Netherlands brought us 1 each of the other 4 other hits. For the last 3 weeks we had seen 7 different nations represented on the charts and this equalled the record to date, but this week was the first time we had 7 different nations represented in the top 10 of the chart.

On the weeks count list, we saw Chris Andrews move level with Creedence Clearwater Revival on 74 weeks and they sat tied 15th. On the local list Tidal Wave moved into 19th spot alongside Peter Lotis. Both acts were on 16 weeks. This meant that Groep Twee and Emil Dean both dropped off the top 20 of the local weeks count list.

Youtube playlist:

11 December 1970

cracklin_diamond

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
2 2 6 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
3 4 5 Woodstock  – Matthews Southern Comfort
4 6 5 Paranoid  – Black Sabbath
5 9 5 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
6 3 11 Cha-La-La, I Need You  – Shuffles
7 11 3 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
8 12 3 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews
9 5 11 Burning Bridges  – Mike Curb Congregation
10 7 9 All the Tears in the World  – Dave Mills
11 8 7 Black Night  – Deep Purple
12 14 5 Band of Gold  – Freda Payne
13 19 2 Ruby Tuesday  – Melanie
14 10 9 Like I Do  – Barbara Ray & 5th Association
15 13 10 Candida  – Dawn
16 17 3 Green Mamba  – Tidal Wave
17 20 2 You Can Get it if You Really Want  – Desmond Dekker
18 New 1 Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow  – Dealians
19 New 1 I Think I Love You  – Partridge Family
20 15 6 A Time for Us (Love Theme From “Romeo & Juliet”)  – Jody Wayne

Neil Diamond’s ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ enjoyed its 4th week at number 1 while Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ sat at number 2 for a second week running.   It was now the 50th different song to spend at least 2 consecutive weeks at number 2. Of the previous 49, 17 had done so after spending time at number 1. Of the remaining 32, 21 had not managed to get number 1 while 11 had. This meant that almost 2 thirds of the songs that spent 2 or more weeks at number 2 which hadn’t yet made the top spot, would not go on to make the number 1 position, so the odds were stacked against Giorgio’s hit.

Melanie’s ‘Ruby Tuesday’ was the climber of the week, moving up 6 places from 19 to 13 while

R Dean Taylor’s ‘Indiana Wants Me’ made it 3 weeks in a row with a star rater climb as it moved up a further 4 places this week, climbing from 9 to 5.

Last week we noted that if one included Virginia Lee’s duet with Slim Whitman, then Wanda Arletti’s ‘Zanzibar’ would have accounted for the 100th time a local song was a star rater. This week ‘Zanzibar’ was a again a star rater and therefore accounted for the 100th time a local song was a star rater excluding Virginia Lee’s duet so either way you look at it, ‘Zanzibar’ was the 100th.

Jody Wayne’s ‘A Time for Us (Love Theme From “Romeo & Juliet”)’ was the faller of the week, dropping 5 from 15 to 20. This was Wayne’s 3rd time with a biggest faller with 1 of the previous occasions being as one half of a duet with Glenys Lynne.

The 2 oldest songs on last week’s chart, The Shuffles’ ‘Cha-La-La, I Need You’ and The Mike Curb Congregation’s ‘Burning Bridges’, were both still with us and had ticked over to 11 weeks in the top 20.

What wasn’t still with us were The Tremeloes’ ‘Me And My Life’ and Bobby Bloom’s ‘Montego Bay’. The former had enjoyed a run of 6 weeks in the charts and peaked at 5 during that time. This was their lowest weeks count and tied lowest peak. To date only 2 other songs spending 6 weeks in the charts had managed to get as high as 5 while 1, Len Barry’s ‘1-2-3’ got to number 4. There would only be 1 further song that would manage a peak of 5 or higher in a 6 week run, but that song was sitting at number 1 on the last ever chart. The Tremeloes’ chart career had now come to an end with us having seen 6 hits from them and every alternate one was a chart topper. Their 3 number 1s clocked up a total of 10 weeks at the top spot which was the tied 4th highest total to date. Their first number 1, ‘Silence Is Golden’ still sat tied at the top of the list for most weeks at 1 as it had been the nation’s favourite song for 7 weeks. Overall The Tremeloes accumulated 71 weeks in the charts and currently sat tied 17th on the weeks count list. When the charts ended in 1989 they would have slipped to position 72.

Bobby Bloom’s ‘Montego Bay’ managed 8 weeks in the chart and peaked at 5. This would be Bloom’s only hit as an artist, but he still had a few more to come as a song writer.

Local act The Dealians came along with their first hit, ‘Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow’ which had the distinction of being the 700th hit to grace our top 20. The song was a cover of a Monkees’ album track which had been written by Neil Diamond and it was Diamond’s 7th SA chart hit as a song writer. The Dealians were formed by Mike Fuller (who went on to manage Clout, Hotline and Little Sister) and took their name from the Deal’s Hotel in East London where they used to perform.

We had previously seen 2 hits by The Cowsills on our charts, but this week we saw a new entry from a fictitious group from a TV show which was loosely based on the Cowsills. ‘I Think I Love You’ by The Partridge Family topped the charts in the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Holland and Belgium. It also made number 18 in the UK and 9 in what was then Rhodesia. Of the cast members from the TV show, only Shirley Jones and David Cassidy actually performed on the record. Cassidy would go on to have a number of solo hits in SA.

There was no movement within the top 20 of the overall weeks count list this week, but on the local one we saw Dave Mills move 1 week ahead of The Bats to make 3rd place his own with the latter falling to 4. Mills was on 45 weeks. Jody Wayne drew level 5th with Gene Rockwell, both acts sitting on 39 weeks while Tidal Wave crept into tied 20th position, their 15 weeks putting them level with Emil Dean and Groep Twee.

The ‘Love Theme From Romeo & Juliet’ clocked up a total of 14 weeks from the 2 versions it had charted in (Jody Wayne and Henry Mancini) and was now tied 15th for weeks in the chart by a song charting in more than 1 version. It shared 15th place with ‘Everybody Knows’ which had charted for The Dave Clark Five and Engelbert Humperdinck.

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4 December 1970

cracklin_diamond

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
2 4 5 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
3 2 10 Cha-La-La, I Need You  – Shuffles
4 7 4 Woodstock  – Matthews Southern Comfort
5 3 10 Burning Bridges  – Mike Curb Congregation
6 8 4 Paranoid  – Black Sabbath
7 5 8 All the Tears in the World  – Dave Mills
8 6 6 Black Night  – Deep Purple
9 14 4 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
10 10 8 Like I Do  – Barbara Ray & 5th Association
11 18 2 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
12 20 2 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews
13 11 9 Candida  – Dawn
14 15 4 Band of Gold  – Freda Payne
15 12 5 A Time for Us (Love Theme From “Romeo & Juliet”)  – Jody Wayne
16 9 8 Montego Bay  – Bobby Bloom
17 19 2 Green Mamba  – Tidal Wave
18 13 6 Me and My Life  – Tremeloes
19 New 1 Ruby Tuesday  – Melanie
20 New 1 You Can Get it if You Really Want  – Desmond Dekker

‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ moved into its 3rd week at number 1 and this was now half the time he had previously spent at number 1 as a song writer on The Monkees ‘I’m A Believer’. Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ moved up 2 into second place to apply some pressure on Diamond.

Chris Andrews took his 7th biggest climber award this week as ‘Yo Yo’ moved up 8 places from 20 to 12. This was the biggest climb that Andrews would ever see and it was the 3rd time he had managed it as ‘Yesterday Man’ and ‘Brown Eyes’ had also previous had an 8 place climb. Only 1 of his 6 hits to date had not been a biggest climber (‘To Whom It Concerns’) and the previous 4 that had been biggest climbers had gone on to reach number 1 so things were boding well for ‘Yo Yo’.

Just missing out on the biggest climber award was Wanda Arletti’s ‘Zanzibar’ which moved up 7 places from 18 to 11. This was the 5th time we had seen a climb of 7 or more places by a local female artist with 3 of those being greater than 7 places. It also marked the 100th local star rater if one includes ‘Tennessee Yodel Polka’, Virginia Lee’s duet with Slim Whitman.

R Dean Taylor’s ‘Indiana Want Me’ was the only other song to make a star rater climb this week, moving up 5 from 14 to 9. This was the second time the song had climbed 4 or more places and this meant that we had had 3 Canadian hits in a row to be a star raters twice.

Bobby Bloom’s ‘Montego Bay’ took the biggest tumble this week as it fell 7 places from 9 to 16 while The Mike Curb Congregation’s ‘Burning Bridges’ and The Shuffles’ ‘Cha-La-La I Need You’ continued on as the oldest in the charts, both songs being on 10 weeks.

The Rising Sons’ ‘Stand Up For The Lady’ was the first of 2 songs to depart the chart. It lasted 5 weeks in the top 20 and peaked at 13. They would see further SA Chart action.

Also going was Petula Clark’s ‘Melody Man’ which lasted just 3 weeks in the charts and peaked at 16. This was the second lowest weeks and peak of her 10 hits to date. So far she had only seen 1 of her hits reach double figures for weeks and of the 25 acts who would eventually have 10 or more hits, no other one would see this low a number of their first 10 hits not reach double figures. The next lowest would be 3 and so far Cliff Richard had achieved this. The leader to date for the highest number of their first 10 hits reaching double figures for weeks was Tom Jones who had seen 7 of the 10 manage this. There would be acts who would see more.

Despite losing Petula Clark from the top 20, the hits by solo females count remained at 3 as Melanie’s cover of The Rolling Stones’ ‘Ruby Tuesday’ was the first of our new entries. This gave Mick Jagger & Keith Richards their 10th hit as song writers and they sat tied 7th overall for number of hits as song writers. The Stones version of the song would top the charts in the US, but in the UK they had to wait for a live version in 1991 to make the charts there and even then it only managed to get to number 59. Melanie (full name Melanie Anne Safka-Schekeryk) would see her cover go to 52 in the US and number 9 in the UK.

Desmond Dekker returned to the charts just over a year after he was last seen in the top 20. Unlike his previous 2 hits hit, his new one, ‘You Can Get It If You Really Want’, did not feature The Aces as his backing band. This was the 8th song by a Jamaican artist to chart and a 3rd hit for Dekker. He was the only Jamaican so far to have seen more than 1 hit chart. ‘You Can Get It If You Really Want’ would give Dekker his second highest peaking song in the UK as it went to number 2 there, only beaten by the chart topping exploits of ‘Israelites’. It would also make it to number 2 in what was then Rhodesia.

Chris Andrews moved on to 72 weeks and made 16th place on the weeks count list his own, knocking Petula Clark, whom he shared the spot with last week, down into 17th place. Petula was joined in 17th place by The Tremeloes who had 71 weeks now. On the local list Dave Mills moved into tied 3rd spot with The Bats with 45 weeks to his name.

The ‘Love Theme from Romeo & Juliet’ which had charted as an instrumental hit for Henry Mancini and was now enjoying a run as ‘A Time For Love (Love Theme From Romero & Juliet)’ by Jody Wayne had now clocked up a total of 13 weeks between the 2 versions and this placed it tied 13th for total weeks by a song charting in more than 1 version. It shared 13th place with ‘I’ll Step Aside’ (Tony Wells & Ronnie Wilson) and ‘Green Tambourine’ (Lemon Pipers and Sun Dragon).

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27 November 1970

cracklin_diamond

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
2 3 9 Cha-La-La, I Need You  – Shuffles
3 2 9 Burning Bridges  – Mike Curb Congregation
4 9 4 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
5 6 7 All the Tears in the World  – Dave Mills
6 10 5 Black Night  – Deep Purple
7 12 3 Woodstock  – Matthews Southern Comfort
8 11 3 Paranoid  – Black Sabbath
9 5 7 Montego Bay  – Bobby Bloom
10 4 7 Like I Do  – Barbara Ray & 5th Association
11 7 8 Candida  – Dawn
12 13 4 A Time for Us (Love Theme From “Romeo & Juliet”)  – Jody Wayne
13 8 5 Me and My Life  – Tremeloes
14 19 3 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
15 17 3 Band of Gold  – Freda Payne
16 18 3 Melody Man  – Petula Clark
17 14 5 Stand Up for the Lady  – Rising Sons
18 New 1 Zanzibar  – Wanda Arletti
19 New 1 Green Mamba  – Tidal Wave
20 New 1 Yo Yo  – Chris Andrews

Neil Diamond’s ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’ enjoyed a second week at number 1, with The Shuffles’ ‘Cha-La-La I Need You’ creeping into 2nd place to apply some pressure on Diamond. We had already seen 2 Dutch acts top the charts (Shocking Blue and Tee Set), so The Shuffles were in a good position.

Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ followed up last week’s biggest climber with another biggest climber as the song moved up a further 5 places from 9 to 4 to take the award this week. Joining ‘Looky Looky’ in a 5 place climb were Matthew’s Southern Comfort’s ‘Woodstock’ and R Dean Taylor’s ‘Indiana Wants Me’ which moved up to 7 and 14 respectively. It was the 7th time a Canadian act had been the biggest climber and a 2nd time for R Dean Taylor who had scored a biggest climb with his previous hit, ‘Gotta See Jane’. Deep Purple’s ‘Black Night’ made a second star rater climb from 10 to 6 and was the only other song to move up 4 or more places in the week.

The faller of the week was Barbara Ray & The 5th Association’s ‘Like I Do’ which dropped 6 places from 4 to 10. This was the 60th time a local song had taken the biggest fall if one includes the time that Virginia Lee’s duet with American Slim Whiteman was the biggest faller.

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Lookin’ Out My Back Door’ was the first of 3 songs to leave the charts this week. It had been with us for 9 weeks and just missed out on topping the charts, peaking as it did at number 2.

Also going was Michael Holm’s ‘Mademoiselle Ninette’ which was the oldest on last week’s chart. It spent 13 weeks in the top 20 and, like ‘Lookin’ Out My back Door’ also peaked at 2. The new oldest on the chart were The Mike Curb Congregation’s ‘Burning Bridges’ and The Shuffles’ ‘Cha-La-La I Need You’ which were both on 9 weeks. We had now seen 15 songs in total become the oldest on just 9 weeks, the lowest week count to date for an oldest song (this excludes songs on the first ever chart).

Last of the leavers was Chris Andrews’ ‘Brown Eyes’ which spent 12 weeks on the charts and managed to go that 1 place better than the 2 other songs leaving the charts this week as it spent 2 weeks at number 1. This was the 3rd time we had seen 2 number 2’s and a chart topper leave the chart in the same week and this was the lowest average peak (1.67) where 3 or more songs left the chart in the week.

Creedence and Michael Holm would both return to the charts at a later date, but Chris Andrews was already back as his new hit, ‘Yo Yo’ was one of the 3 new entries. Andrews was the 10th act now to have a song leave and another enter the chart in the same week with Cliff Richard being the only act to manage this twice. ‘Yo Yo’ was Andrews’ 6th hit to make the top 20 and, like the previous 5, had been written by himself. In total Andrews had now charted 9 times as a song writer, the other 3 where he wasn’t the artist were all hits for Sandie Shaw. ‘Yo Yo’ would give him a number 4 hit in Austria and would top the charts in what was then Rhodesia.

Wanda Arletti’s ‘Zanzibar’ was her first SA chart hit. It was written by British musician Gordon Haskell and appeared on his album called ‘Sail In My Boat’. Haskell had already seen one of compositions top our charts and that was when Quentin E. Klopjager (aka Billy Forrest) took a cover of Haskell’s ‘Lazy Life’ to number 1 back in 1968. There was a further South African connection with Haskell as he played in a British band called Fleur de Lys which featured out very own Sharon Tandy. Wanda (sometimes spelt Vanda) Arletti was born Wanda Arletowicz in Hackney, England of Polish parents. She sang for the Staccatos and married the group’s guitarist Richard Crouse. ‘Zanzibar’ was the second of 4 songs to start with ‘Z’ that would make our charts, the previous one being Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mich & Titch’s ‘Zabadak’.

The other new entry was a second SA chart hit for Tidal Wave, ‘Green Mamba’. Like their previous hit, ‘Spider Spider’ it was written by Terry Dempsey and he equalled Chris Andrews 9 hits to date as a song writer. Tidal Wave featured Mike Pilot on guitar. Pilot would go on to form the band Stingray with Dennis East.

The local hit count moved up to 6 with 2 of the new entries being by South African acts (Wanda Arletti is considered local as she moved to SA and made her music there). This hit count was just 1 less than the record to date 7 we had seen in the top 20 in a week. It also meant that the local acts equalled those from the UK for the most by a nation in the top 20. Apart from the 6 each from local acts and British acts, we had 5 by Americans and 1 each from a Canadian, an Italian and a Dutch act.

Last week saw Chris Andrews and Petula Clark reach the 70 weeks in the chart mark and this week it was The Tremeloes’ turn to reach that total. Andrews and Clark were unmoved at number 16 on the weeks count list while The Tremeloes joined Donovan in tied 18th place. On the local list, Jody Wayne moved 1 week ahead of Virginia Lee to have 6th place all to himself while Lee dropped into 7th place.

On the points front, we saw Dave Mills go past the 600 points mark and The Tremloes had reached the 900 points milestone. The Tremleoes were sitting 15th overall for points while Dave Mills was 25th overall and 3rd for a local act.

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20 November 1970

cracklin_diamond

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 5 Cracklin’ Rosie  – Neil Diamond
2 1 8 Burning Bridges  – Mike Curb Congregation
3 4 8 Cha-La-La, I Need You  – Shuffles
4 6 6 Like I Do  – Barbara Ray & 5th Association
5 7 6 Montego Bay  – Bobby Bloom
6 8 6 All the Tears in the World  – Dave Mills
7 3 7 Candida  – Dawn
8 5 4 Me and My Life  – Tremeloes
9 15 3 Looky Looky  – Giorgio
10 12 4 Black Night  – Deep Purple
11 16 2 Paranoid  – Black Sabbath
12 17 2 Woodstock  – Matthews Southern Comfort
13 14 3 A Time for Us (Love Theme From “Romeo & Juliet”)  – Jody Wayne
14 13 4 Stand Up for the Lady  – Rising Sons
15 10 12 Brown Eyes  – Chris Andrews
16 9 13 Mademoiselle Ninette  – Michael Holm
17 18 2 Band of Gold  – Freda Payne
18 19 2 Melody Man  – Petula Clark
19 20 2 Indiana Wants Me  – R. Dean Taylor
20 11 9 Lookin’ Out My Back Door  – Creedence Clearwater Revival

After 5 weeks at the top of our charts, The Mike Curb Congregation’s ‘Burning Bridges’ was finally ousted from the number 1 slot and the new chart topper was Neil Diamond’s ‘Cracklin’ Rosie’. Diamond was no stranger to our number 1 slot as he had already seen his composition, ‘I’m A Believer’ by The Monkees spend 6 weeks there, but this was his first time at the top as an artist. ‘Burning Bridges’ dropped to number 2. Of the 118 occasions a song had fallen from the number 1 spot, there were 71 times when it fell to number 2. This represented just over 60%.

Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’ took the climber of the week award as it moved up 6 places from 15 to 9. This was the first of only 12 occasions that the biggest climber would be by an Italian act.

There were 2 other songs that made a star rater climb and they were Black Sabbath’s ‘Paranoid’ and Matthew’s Southern Comfort’s ‘Woodstock’ with the former moving up 5 from 16 to 11 and the latter also moving up 5, going from 17 to 12. Of the artists on the 3 star raters this week, only Giorgio was not seeing this for the first time as he had clocked up his first star rater last week.

Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Lookin’ Out My Back Door’ became the 31st song to be the biggest faller 2 weeks running as it dropped a further 9 places from 11 to 20 this week. Of the other 30 times a song had managed this, only The Cowsills’ ‘Indian Lake’ had gone on to make it 3 weeks running with a biggest faller. To date only 18 songs had seen a fall of 9 or more places in a week, half of these had now been by American acts with the Brits seeing 8 and Gene Rockwell’s ‘Love’ being the solitary local song so far to do this.

Michael Holm’s ‘Mademoiselle Ninette’ enjoyed a second week as the oldest on the charts. It had been with us for 13 weeks now.

This week was the 5th time we saw no movement on or off the charts. Interestingly we had now seen these ‘no movement’ charts occur after a week where we had seen 1, 2, 3, 4 and now 5 (but not in that order) new entries in the week prior to the ‘no movement’ week.

There were 2 acts which reached the 70 weeks in the chart milestone this week and they were Chris Andrews and Petula Clark. They both moved into tied 16th place on the weeks count list, joining Donovan on that total. The Tremeloes moved 1 week ahead of Four Jacks & A Jill, thus securing 19th place on the weeks count list for themselves and relegating the local act into 20th spot. Jody Wayne moved tied 6th on the local list, his 36 weeks to date putting him on level pegging with Virginia Lee.

As there was no movement on or off the charts this week, it has given me a chance to look at some of more obscure stats so here goes. This week saw the 5th lowest number of ‘unique’ words in the titles of the songs in the charts to date. Only 16 of the words that appeared in the song titles this week had not been seen in any other song so far. Those words were, in alphabetical order: ‘bridges’, ‘burning’, ‘Candida’, ‘Cha-la-la’, ‘Cracklin’, ‘door’, ‘gold’, ‘Indiana’, ‘lookin’ (there had been no ‘looking’ either yet), ‘Mademoiselle’, ‘Montego’, ‘Ninette’, ‘Paranoid’, ‘Rosie’, ‘wants’ and ‘Woodstock’. Of these, the 5 underlined ones would not be seen in any other song title that would chart during the entire duration of the charts. The lowest ‘unique’ word count to date was 12 which occurred on 12 January 1968 while 21 July 1967 saw a record to date 34 unique words. Okay, I’ll shut up now.

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