9 November 1973

tommy-overstreet-heaven-is-my-womans-love-dot

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Heaven is My Woman’s Love  – Tommy Overstreet
2 2 11 Baby Blue  – George Baker Selection
3 6 6 Funny Face  – Barbara Ray
4 3 14 Clap Your Hands and Stamp Your Feet  – Maria
5 5 6 Do You Love Me  – Geli & Billy
6 4 10 I Wanna Live  – Tommy Oliver
7 8 14 Take Me to the Mardi Gras  – Paul Simon
8 7 8 Smoke on the Water  – Deep Purple
9 11 5 Going Down Jordan  – Rising Sons
10 15 3 The Ballroom Blitz  – Sweet
11 9 13 One & One is One  – Medicine Head
12 12 9 Born to be with You  – Dave Edmunds
13 18 3 My Daddy was a Rock ‘n Roll Man  – Johnny Gibson
14 10 17 Ashes of Love  – Dickey Lee
15 16 4 The Free Electric Band  – Albert Hammond
16 13 5 Delta Dawn  – Helen Reddy
17 17 4 I Can’t Go Home to Mary  – Dave Mills
18 New 1 Universal Feeling  – Four Jacks & a Jill
19 New 1 Come Back Liza  – Lionel Petersen
20 New 1 Waikiki Man  – Jessica Jones

Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ enjoyed a second week at number 1 with the former chart topper, The George Baker Selection’s ‘Baby Blue’ sitting unmoved at 2. This was the 160th week we had seen an American act at the top of the charts and the Americans were now 11 weeks behind the Brits who led the way with their acts having seen 171 weeks so far.

There were 2 songs that shared the climber of the week award and they were The Sweet’s ‘Ballroom Blitz’ and Johnny Gibson’s ‘My Daddy Was A Rock ‘n Roll Man’ which both climbed 5 places to land at 10 and 13 respectively. It was The Sweet’s 10th time with the climber award and they were the 3rd of only 10 acts who would reach double figures for number of climbers. These were also the only 2 star raters this week.

Dickey Lee’s ‘Ashes Of Love’ took the faller of the week award with a 4 place drop for 10 to 14. The song had been a biggest faller 12 weeks previously and this was the second biggest gap between fallers that a song had seen. Only the 15 week gap that Alan Garrity’s ‘I Need Someone’ was bigger. There would only be 2 more songs that would see a bigger gap than ‘Ashes Of Love’ had just seen.

Despite the disappointment of being a biggest faller again, Dickey Lee could take heart from the fact that his song was the oldest on the charts as the previous oldest, Double Vision’s ‘Maori Love Song’ fell off the charts. ‘Ashes Of Love’ was on 17 weeks. After a false start of just 1 week in the charts, ‘Maori Love Song’ re-entered and managed an all time 2nd best weeks run for a re-entry of 20 weeks, bringing its total weeks count to 21. It peaked at 5 during its time in the charts and this was the lowest peak for a song spending 21 or more weeks in the charts. ‘Maori Love Song’ would be Double Vision’s only SA chart hit.

We also said goodbye to the second version of ‘Shamabala’. B.W. Stevenson’s version had fared better than the Three Dog Night one as it lasted 14 weeks and peaked at 8 while the latter only managed 11 weeks and peaked at 13. And while the departure of Three Dog Night’s ‘Shambala’ from the charts brought an end to their chart career, it would not have the same effect for Stevenson. In total ‘Shamabala’ managed 25 weeks between its 2 versions and with was the tied 9th best weeks count for a song charting in more than 1 version.

Also going was Vicky Leandros’ ‘When Bouzoukis Played’. It had been with us for 12 weeks and peaked 7 and was the first of her 3 hits to date not to manage at least 20 weeks in the charts.

All 3 of the new entries were by local acts which brought the local hit count up to a record equalling 10. The only other time this figure had been this high was back in July 1971, 122 weeks previously.

The first of the new entries marked the return of Four Jacks & A Jill. Just 2 weeks previously, we had seen a new record for gaps between hits for local acts as Johnny Gibson saw 275 weeks between his previous hit and his current one. Four Jacks & A Jill went 10 weeks better as it had been 285 weeks since they were last seen in the charts with ‘Mr Nico’. Overall, this was the 3rd biggest gap we had seen so far with Jonathan King’s 292 weeks (this counts his hit under the name Sakkarin as being him) and Perry Como’s 384 weeks being the overall biggest gaps so far. ‘Universal Feeling’ was written by A. Gold And A Goldstein. The band were busy touring the country with Double Vision (who left the charts this week as support) and ‘Universal Feeling’ became their 8th song to chart. They were now in second place for hits count by local acts with Billy Forrest on 9 leading the way.

Lionel Petersen made his first solo chart appearance with ‘Come Back Liza’. He had already featured on the charts doing lead vocals on The Invaders’ January 1971 hit ‘There’s A Light There’s A Way’ (3 weeks, peak of 18) and was a member of The Miracles who charted in 1972 with ‘Sweet City Woman’. ‘Come Back Liza’ was recorded by Harry Belafonte for his ‘Calypso’ album in 1956. The album made it to the top of the US charts, but his version of the song was not released as a single.

Last of the newcomers was Jessica Jones’ 3rd hit, ‘Waikiki Man’. The song was written by Peter Koelewijn who had also written Maria’s ‘Clap Your Hand And Stamp Your Feet’. Like Maria’s hit, ‘Waikiki Man’ was recorded by Dutch singer Bonnie St Clair and her version made it to 4 in Belgium, 5 in Holland, 14 in Austria and 30 in Germany. Jessica did have some international success with her version as it made number 7 on the New Zealand charts.

Positions 3, 4 and 5 were occupied by local acts (Barbara Ray, Maria, and Geli & Billy) giving us the 27th time we had 3 in the top 5.

The weeks count for acts from The Netherlands moved on to 64 and they pulled 1 ahead of acts from France. The Netherlands were 8th overall for weeks and the French 9th.

Barbara Ray became the 30th act to reach 60 weeks in the charts and she was the second woman and 7th local act to do so.

The Sweet’s weeks count moved on to 82 and they moved into tied 14th place on the weeks count list, joining Chris Andrews there. On the local list, Billy Forrest drew level in 4th place with John Edmond on 63 weeks. Maria moved 1 week ahead of Groep Twee but still sat in 16th place while Groep Twee dropped into 17th. The Rising Sons returned to the top 20 of the local weeks count list as their 31 weeks to date put them tied 19th with Peter Lotis and Des Lindberg. The Rising Sons had been missing from the top 20 of the local weeks count list for 47 weeks.

Barbara Ray also celebrated moving past the 700 points mark. She was the 27th act to do this and the first woman. Vicky Leadros had the second highest score for a woman as she was on 691 with Petula Clark being 3rd on 690. Ray’s points total of 715 was the 5th highest to date for a local act.

Youtube playlist:

2 November 1973

tommy-overstreet-heaven-is-my-womans-love-dot

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 3 5 Heaven is My Woman’s Love  – Tommy Overstreet
2 1 10 Baby Blue  – George Baker Selection
3 2 13 Clap Your Hands and Stamp Your Feet  – Maria
4 4 9 I Wanna Live  – Tommy Oliver
5 7 5 Do You Love Me  – Geli & Billy
6 5 5 Funny Face  – Barbara Ray
7 10 7 Smoke on the Water  – Deep Purple
8 6 13 Take Me to the Mardi Gras  – Paul Simon
9 9 12 One & One is One  – Medicine Head
10 8 16 Ashes of Love  – Dickey Lee
11 13 4 Going Down Jordan  – Rising Sons
12 11 8 Born to be with You  – Dave Edmunds
13 15 4 Delta Dawn  – Helen Reddy
14 12 21 Maori Love Song  – Double Vision
15 19 2 The Ballroom Blitz  – Sweet
16 17 3 The Free Electric Band  – Albert Hammond
17 18 3 I Can’t Go Home to Mary  – Dave Mills
18 20 2 My Daddy was a Rock ‘n Roll Man  – Johnny Gibson
19 14 14 Shambala  – B.W. Stevenson
20 16 12 When Bouzoukis Played  – Vicky Leandros

Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ became the 54th chart topper by an American act as the song knocked The George Baker Selection’s ‘Baby Blue’ from the top spot this week. The latter had been at number 1 for 3 weeks. ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ was the first of 3 songs that had the word ‘heaven’ in the title to make number 1. ‘Baby Blue’ dropped to number 2.

The Sweet became the 5th of 12 acts that would eventually see 9 or more biggest climbers as their ‘Ballroom Blitz’ took the honours with a 4 place climb from 19 top 15. This would be their 11th star rater and they were the 17th act to see this many star raters. There were no other star raters this week.

Falling honours went to B.W. Stevenson’s ‘Shambala’ which  dropped 5 from 14 to 19. It was the second time the song had taken the award and as it was Stevenson’s only hit to date, also his second time with the award. Three Dog Night’s version of the song had never experienced anything more than a 2 place drop in any week.

Double Vision’s ‘Maori Love Song’ moved on to 21 weeks in the charts and was enjoying its 3rd as the oldest in the top 20.

This week was the 10th time there were no new entries and no songs leaving the chart. It was the 5th time this had happened in 1973 which was the record to date for number of times in a year.

Rising Sons celebrated 30 weeks in the charts and in that time they had never experienced having a biggest faller. 12 acts so far had managed a run of at least 30 weeks without a biggest faller and Rising Sons were the second local act after John Edmond to do this. There would be 2 more local acts that would manage to spend 30 weeks in the charts without having a biggest faller.

The Netherlands who pulled ahead of Jamaica last week for week in the charts, now drew level with the French with both nations having seen their acts spent 63 weeks in total in the charts. They sat tied 8th on the weeks by a nation list.

We saw a second consecutive week with 3 of the top 5 being by local acts with Geli & Billy’s ‘Do You Love Me’ moving up into the top 5 to replace Barbara Rays’ ‘Funny Face’ which dropped to 6. This was the 26th week where we had at least 3 of the top 5 by local acts.

The George Baker Selection celebrated their 20th week in the charts. They were the 12 act not from SA, the UK or the US to reach this total.

It had been 22 weeks since we last saw a change in the top 20 of the overall weeks count list and that stalemate was finally broken by The Sweet as their 81 weeks to date moved them up from 18th into tied 15th place alongside Cliff Richard, Manfred Mann and Middle Of The Road. Of the 3 that The Sweet shared a place with, only Cliff Richard had not finished his SA chart career.

On the local list we saw Billy Forrest move level with Alan Garrity on 62 weeks and they sat tied 5th. Maria moved into tied 16th place with Groep Twee with 34 weeks to her name.

Paul Simon became the 47th act to reach the 500 points in the charts mark as his total ticked over to

  1. He was the 16th male artist to reach this total.

Youtube playlist:

26 October 1973

george-baker-selection-baby-blue

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 9 Baby Blue  – George Baker Selection
2 2 12 Clap Your Hands and Stamp Your Feet  – Maria
3 4 4 Heaven is My Woman’s Love  – Tommy Overstreet
4 5 8 I Wanna Live  – Tommy Oliver
5 6 4 Funny Face  – Barbara Ray
6 3 12 Take Me to the Mardi Gras  – Paul Simon
7 10 4 Do You Love Me  – Geli & Billy
8 7 15 Ashes of Love  – Dickey Lee
9 8 11 One & One is One  – Medicine Head
10 9 6 Smoke on the Water  – Deep Purple
11 11 7 Born to be with You  – Dave Edmunds
12 13 20 Maori Love Song  – Double Vision
13 15 3 Going Down Jordan  – Rising Sons
14 12 13 Shambala  – B.W. Stevenson
15 17 3 Delta Dawn  – Helen Reddy
16 16 11 When Bouzoukis Played  – Vicky Leandros
17 20 2 The Free Electric Band  – Albert Hammond
18 18 2 I Can’t Go Home to Mary  – Dave Mills
19 New 1 The Ballroom Blitz  – Sweet
20 New 1 My Daddy was a Rock ‘n Roll Man  – Johnny Gibson

‘Baby Blue’ hung on to the top spot to make it 3 weeks in a row there. This brought up the 10th week where a song by an act from The Netherlands had been the nation’s favourite. Maria’s ‘Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet’ was unmoved at 2 and had been sitting there since ‘Baby Blue’ dethroned it from the number 1 position.

It took only a 3 place jump to be climber of the week and 2 songs managed this. The first of these was the local duo of Geli & Billy which climbed from 10 to 7. Billy Forrest (the Billy in the duet) had now seen 7 biggest climbers and he moved into the outright lead for this for local acts, going 1 ahead of Barbara Ray whom he shared the lead with until this week. Only 4 local acts would see 7 or more biggest climbers while 35 acts overall would do so. Albert Hammond had picked up 3 biggest climbers with songs that he had written, but this week saw him picking up the award for the first time as an artist. ‘The Free Electric Band’ moved up 3 from 20 to 17 to share the award with Geli & Billy. There were no star rater climbs this week.

Paul Simon picked up his second biggest faller award as a solo artist with a 3 place drop from 3 to 6 by ‘Take Me To The Mardi Gras’. Simon had managed to go 49 weeks alongside his partner Art Garfunkel without seeing a single biggest faller, but now he had 2 as a solo artist.

Double Vision’s ‘Maori Love Song’ joined the 20 week club as it total ticked over to 20 although this was done in an initial run of 1 week and now a further 19. It was the song’s second week as the oldest in the top 20.

‘She (Didn’t Remember My Name)’ by Osmosis was the first of 2 songs to leave the charts. It had only been with us for 3 weeks all of which were spent at number 19. This would be the only song that would ever make our charts to have such a run and was the 1st of 4 songs that would have a run of 3 weeks in the charts all of which were spent in the same position. Spending the 3 weeks at 19 would be the highest charting of the 4 songs with 1 spending 3 weeks at 20 while 2 would spend 3 weeks at 28 once the charts were extended to a top 30. ‘She (Didn’t Remember My Name)’ would be Osmosis’ only SA chart hit.

We also bid farewell to the ‘Long Train Runnin’ that The Doobie Brothers were driving. It spent 8 weeks on the charts and peaked at 11. They would return to our charts at a later date.

The Sweet clocked up a 7th hit as ‘The Ballroom Blitz’ entered the charts at 19. They were the 29th act to reach this many hits. This was an 8th hit for the songwriting team of Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn. The song topped the charts in Australia, Canada, Germany and Ireland, made number 2 in Holland, Norway and the UK, 3 in Sweden and Switzerland, 5 in the US and Austria and 10 in Finland. In 1992 Tia Carrere performed a blistering cover of the song in the film ‘Wayne’s World’

The second new entry was ‘My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man’ by British born local lad Johnny Gibson. He was last seen on the charts with his hit ‘Silver And Blue’ 275 weeks previously. This was a new record for gaps between hits by a local act, beating Peter Lotis’ record of 258 weeks between hits. Gibson’s 275 week gap was the 4th biggest overall we had seen to date from any act with Perry Como’s 384 week gap being the biggest to date. Gibson penned ‘My Daddy Was A Rock ‘N Roll Man’ along with Roy Sathige. Depending on which comment you read on the Youtube video for this song, Gibson either passed away a few years back, or is alive and well and living in Northern Ireland (maybe he’s hanging out with Elvis?). His sister Marie would have a hit on the Springbok charts in 1976.

With Maria, Tommy Oliver and Barbara Ray all being in the top 5, we saw the 25th time local acts had 3 in the top 5. The best we had ever seen (and included in the 25 time to date) was a week back in November 1972 when we had 4 of the top 5 as local acts. It was also the 45th week where we had more local acts in the charts than from any other nation with 7 of the top 20 being by SA acts, 5 by Brits, 4 by Americans, and Australia, Greece, The Netherlands and New Zealand contribution 1 hit each.

The Netherlands pulled 1 ahead of the Jamaicans for weeks in the charts with acts from the former having clocked up 62 compared to the 61 acts from the latter had managed. The Netherlands were 9th on the overall list of weeks by a nation while Jamaica dropped into 10th place.

While Double Vision became the 128th act to spend 20 weeks on the charts, The Sweet were enjoying their 80th and they sat 18th on the overall weeks count list.

On the local weeks count list we saw Maria move up into tied 17th place alongside Murray Campbell with both acts having spent 33 weeks with us.

This week also saw the 6th time we had acts with the first name Tommy sitting in adjacent places on the charts as Tommy Overstreet was at 3 and Tommy Oliver was at 4. We had seen 3 times when Tommy Roe and Tommy James & The Shondells had sat next to each other, once when Tommy Roe had 2 of his hits in adjacent positions and last week we had seen the Overstreet/Dell combination as well.  This would, however, be the last time the Tommy’s teamed up in such a manner.

Youtube playlist:

19 October 1973

george-baker-selection-baby-blue

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 Baby Blue  – George Baker Selection
2 2 11 Clap Your Hands and Stamp Your Feet  – Maria
3 4 11 Take Me to the Mardi Gras  – Paul Simon
4 6 3 Heaven is My Woman’s Love  – Tommy Overstreet
5 3 7 I Wanna Live  – Tommy Oliver
6 9 3 Funny Face  – Barbara Ray
7 5 14 Ashes of Love  – Dickey Lee
8 7 10 One & One is One  – Medicine Head
9 11 5 Smoke on the Water  – Deep Purple
10 14 3 Do You Love Me  – Geli & Billy
11 12 6 Born to be with You  – Dave Edmunds
12 8 12 Shambala  – B.W. Stevenson
13 10 19 Maori Love Song  – Double Vision
14 16 8 Long Train Runnin’  – Doobie Brothers
15 18 2 Going Down Jordan  – Rising Sons
16 13 10 When Bouzoukis Played  – Vicky Leandros
17 20 2 Delta Dawn  – Helen Reddy
18 New 1 I Can’t Go Home to Mary  – Dave Mills
19 19 3 She (Didn’t Remember My Name)  – Osmosis
20 New 1 The Free Electric Band  – Albert Hammond

The George Baker Selection’s ‘Baby Blue’ enjoyed a second week at the top of the charts while the previous 2 chart toppers, Maria’s ‘Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet’ and Paul Simon’s ‘Take Me To The Mardi Gras’ were at 2 and 3 respectively.

Geli & Billy’s ‘Do You Love Me’ had been a star rater last week with a 6 place climb, but had been beaten by Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ for the climber of the week award. This week, ‘Do You Love Me’ was a star rater climber again, moving up 4 places from 14 to 10, but this week its climb was good enough to take the climber of the week award.

B.W. Stevenson’s ‘Shambala’ was the faller of the week as it dropped 4 from 8 to 12. Apart from 1 week during the previous 11, Stevenson’s version had always been placed higher than the Three Dog Night version and this week, it was the only version left of the charts as Three Dog Nights version ended its run in the top 20. The latter version had spent 11 weeks in the charts and peaked at 13. This brought to an end their SA chart career after 3 hits, 29 weeks and a best peak of 1 which ‘Joy To The World’ managed for 3 weeks.

Also leaving the chart was a former chart topper, ‘Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree’. It managed 20 weeks in the top 20 and spent 4 of those at number 1. As with Three Dog Night, Dawn had now seen the last of their SA chart action. They managed 4 hits, spent 56 weeks in the charts and as ‘Knock Three Times’ also made number 1 for 6 weeks, they had a total weeks at 1 of 10. So far 11 acts had spent 10 or more weeks at 1. The departure of ‘Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree’ meant that we had a new oldest song in the charts and that was Double Vision’s ‘Maori Love Song’ which sat on 19 weeks.

Dave Mills just missed out on joining the 100 weeks between hits club as his new one, ‘I Can’t Go Home To Mary’ entered the charts 99 weeks after his previous hit, ‘Mexico’, departed. Already his new one had a better peak than his previous hit as that had only spent 1 week in the charts and spent that week at 20. This was Mills’ 7 hit to date and he joined Jody Wayne and Four Jacks & A Jill in tied second place for hits by a local act, sitting 2 behind leader Billy Forrest. ‘I Can’t Go Home To Mary’ was written by Terry Dempsey and this was his 23rd hit as a song writer. This put him 5 ahead of Les Reed who had the second highest number of hits as a song writer.

The second new entry was by an artist who had already had 4 hits as a songwriter, but was making his debut as an artist. Albert Hammond had had a hand in writing Leapy Lee’s ‘Little Arrows’, Joe Dolan’s ‘Make Me An Island’ and ‘’You And The Looking Glass’ as well as The Pipkins ‘Gimme Dat Ding’. ‘Make Me An Island’ had reached number 2 which was the best to date for a Hammond composition. He was the 14th person so far who would chart first as a song writer and then make it as a solo artist. Also credited for writing ‘The Free Electric Band’ was Mike Hazelwood who, with Hammond, had co-written all but Leapy Lee’s hit of the ones mentioned above. ‘The Free Electric Band’ made number 19 in the UK and 48 in the US as well as getting to 1 in Norway, 2 in Austria, 3 in Holland, 4 in Germany and Switzerland, 5 in Belgium and 28 in Australia. Hammond received an OBE in 2000 and was inducted into the Songwriters Hall Of Fame in 2008.

Acts from The Netherlands caught up with those form Jamaica for weeks in the chart as the 2 nations has seen their artists spend a total of 61 weeks each in the top 20. They sat tied 9th for weeks in the charts by a nation.

Two local acts celebrated reaching weeks in the chart milestones. Billy Forrest hit the 60 mark while Dave Mills reached 70. Forrest was in 6th place on the local list and just 2 behind 5th places Alan Garrity while Mills sat 2nd, 13 weeks off the pace that The Staccatos had set. Also on the local weeks count list we saw Maria pull 1 ahead of Des Lindberg and Peter Lotis with Maria owning 18th place on her own while Lindberg and Lotis dropped to tied 19th.

Despite losing Three Dog Night’s version, ‘Shambala’ still moved up the list for weeks by a song charting in more than 1 version as B.W. Stevenson’s version took the song’s total to 23 weeks. It was now tied 11th on the aforementioned list, joining ‘Ramblin’ Boy’ (Des Lindberg and We Three) and ‘The Letter’ (Trini Lopez and The Box Tops) in that position.

We saw the average weeks that the top 20 songs had been with us drop to the lowest it had been in 30 weeks as it fell from 7.5 last week to 6.95.

Youtube playlist:

12 October 1973

george-baker-selection-baby-blue

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 7 Baby Blue  – George Baker Selection
2 1 10 Clap Your Hands and Stamp Your Feet  – Maria
3 6 6 I Wanna Live  – Tommy Oliver
4 3 10 Take Me to the Mardi Gras  – Paul Simon
5 5 13 Ashes of Love  – Dickey Lee
6 17 2 Heaven is My Woman’s Love  – Tommy Overstreet
7 4 9 One & One is One  – Medicine Head
8 8 11 Shambala  – B.W. Stevenson
9 18 2 Funny Face  – Barbara Ray
10 9 18 Maori Love Song  – Double Vision
11 12 4 Smoke on the Water  – Deep Purple
12 10 5 Born to be with You  – Dave Edmunds
13 7 9 When Bouzoukis Played  – Vicky Leandros
14 20 2 Do You Love Me  – Geli & Billy
15 13 20 Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree  – Dawn & Tony Orlando
16 11 7 Long Train Runnin’  – Doobie Brothers
17 15 11 Shambala  – Three Dog Night
18 New 1 Going Down Jordan  – Rising Sons
19 19 2 She (Didn’t Remember My Name)  – Osmosis
20 New 1 Delta Dawn  – Helen Reddy

The George Baker Selection’s ‘Baby Blue’ took over the top spot from Maria’s ‘Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet’ after the latter had seen 2 runs of 2 weeks each at number 1. ‘Baby Blue’ was the 9th song by an act that was not from the US, the UK or SA to make number 1 and this put The Netherlands in the lead for number 1s by a non-big 3 nation as this was the 3rd by a Dutch act to make the top spot (previous ones were Shocking Blue’s ‘Venus’ and Tee Set’s ‘Ma Belle Amie’). Germany had seen 2 chart toppers while Australia, France, Italy and Greece had 1 apiece. This was also the 8th week we had seen with a chart topper from The Netherlands and this moved the Dutch 1 ahead of the Germans for weeks at 1 and they were the leading non-big 3 nation in this category too.

Tommy Overstreet’s ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’ gave us the 21st occasion that we had a climb of 11 or more places in a week as it jumped from 17 to 6. This was the climber of the week. Also moving up at star rater pace was Barbara Ray’s ‘Funny Face’ which moved up 9 from 18 to 9 and Geli & Billy’s ‘Do You Love Me’ which moved up 6 from 20 to 14. Ray’s 9 place climb was the 10th of at least this magnitude that we had seen so far from a local act and Ray would be the only local act to manage this twice as she had previously seen ‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ climb 9 in a week.

Falling honours went to Vicky Leandros’ ‘When Bouzoukis Played’ which dropped 6 from 7 to 13. This was her 4th time with the award.

Dawn’s ‘Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree’ was the oldest on the chart for a second week. It had been with us for 20 weeks and was the 29th song to reach this milestone.

We said goodbye to 2 songs, the first of which was Perry Como’s ‘And I Love You So’ which had weeks and peak figures exactly matching his only other hit to date, ‘Stand Beside Me’, both of which had spent 16 weeks in the charts and peaked at 2. ‘And I Love You So’ just pipped ‘Stand Beside Me’ for points as it managed 194 to the latter’s 186.

We called time on The Dealians as their ‘Time’ also dropped off the top 20 and it would be their last SA chart hit. It had seen a run of 15 weeks and a peak of 5. The Dealians had seen a total of 5 songs make the charts, enjoyed 50 weeks in the top 20  with their first hit, ‘Look Out Here Comes Tomorrow’ being their most successful, peaking at 1 for 3 weeks back in the January of 1971.

The first of the new entries was The Rising Sons with their 4th hit to date, ‘Going Down Jordan’. The song was a cover of a 1961 song by Harry Belafonte which appeared on his ‘Jump Up Calypso’ album. The song by Belafonte did not chart in either the UK or US. In 1971 The Les Humphries Singers’ also covered the song. Their version did not chart in the US either, but made number 3 in Germany and Switzerland and 9 in Holland. The Rising Sons were the 5th act to chart who had spent at least 1 week in the chart every year since 1970 with the Bee Gees being the only 1 of those 5 whose run went further back as they had seen chart action every year going back to 1967.

New to the charts (both the song and the artist) was Helen Reddy’s ‘Delta Down’. This was the 12th song by an Australian to hit our charts (note: I have classified Helen as Australian as most chart books do despite Wikipedia calling her an Australian-American) and the 1st by an Aussie woman. ‘Delta Dawn’ was first recorded in 1971 by Alex Harvey (not the one from The Sensational Alex Harvey Band) who wrote it with Larry Collins, but its first success was when Tanya Tucker took it to number 6 on the Billboard Country Charts and 72 on the main Billboard Hot 100 in 1972. But when Helen Reddy laid her hands (or should one say vocal chords) on it, she took it to the top of the US charts, dislodging Marvin Gaye’s ‘Let’s Get It On’ from the top spot there.

Dave Edmunds and Deep Purple both celebrated reaching the 20 weeks in the chart mark and if you count Tony Orlando’s chart career from when he was given a separate credit as the artists on ‘Tie A Yellow Ribbon’ (previous releases had been just as Dawn, although he was involved in those), then he was also celebrating reaching 20 weeks. This brought the total of artists who had reached this many weeks to 127.

The George Baker Selection set a new high for weeks by acts from The Netherlands as their total moved on to 17 putting them 1 ahead of Tee Set and The Shuffles.

Maria joined Peter Lotis and Des Lindberg in tied 18th place on the local weeks count list with 31 weeks to her name while Dickie Loader dropped off the top 20 of that list.

Youtube playlist:

5 October 1973

maria-clap-your-hands-and-stamp-your-feet-epidemic

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 9 Clap Your Hands and Stamp Your Feet  – Maria
2 2 6 Baby Blue  – George Baker Selection
3 3 9 Take Me to the Mardi Gras  – Paul Simon
4 5 8 One & One is One  – Medicine Head
5 4 12 Ashes of Love  – Dickey Lee
6 10 5 I Wanna Live  – Tommy Oliver
7 7 8 When Bouzoukis Played  – Vicky Leandros
8 8 10 Shambala  – B.W. Stevenson
9 6 17 Maori Love Song  – Double Vision
10 18 4 Born to be with You  – Dave Edmunds
11 12 6 Long Train Runnin’  – Doobie Brothers
12 19 3 Smoke on the Water  – Deep Purple
13 9 19 Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree  – Dawn & Tony Orlando
14 11 15 Time  – Dealians
15 13 10 Shambala  – Three Dog Night
16 14 16 And I Love You So  – Perry Como
17 New 1 Heaven is My Woman’s Love  – Tommy Overstreet
18 New 1 Funny Face  – Barbara Ray
19 New 1 She (Didn’t Remember My Name)  – Osmosis
20 New 1 Do You Love Me  – Geli & Billy

Having regained the top spot last week, Maria’s ‘Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet’ held on to it this week while The George Baker Selection’s ‘Baby Blue’ spent a second week at 2. Maria’s hit had now spent a total of 4 weeks at 1 and it clocked up the 80th week at 1 for a local act.

Dave Edmunds’ ‘Born To Be With You’ was the climber of the week as it moved up 8 from 18 to 10. Edmunds’ previous hit, ‘I Hear You Knockin’ also managed a biggest climber during its chart run, and that was with a 7 place climb.

Apart from Edmund’s 8 place climb we also saw Tommy Oliver’s ‘I Wanna Live’ make a star rater climb of 4 from 10 to 6 and Deep Purple’s ‘Smoke On the Water’ also making a star rater climb. It moved up 7 from 19 to 12.

Dawn picked up their 4th biggest faller award as ‘Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree’ fell 4 from 9 to 13. Of Dawn’s 4 hits so far, only ‘Candida’ made it through its chart career without a biggest fall while ‘Knock Three Times’ was the only one to see this award twice. The good news for Dawn was that their song was the oldest on the charts. It was on 19 weeks and replaced Shirley Bassey’s ‘Never, Never, Never’ as the oldest as the latter fell off the top 20 this week. Bassey hit had managed 22 weeks in the charts, 4 of which were spent at the number 1 spot. This would be Bassey’s only SA chart hit.

The other 3 songs to go were all by local acts and this was the 7th time we had lost 3 local songs in a single week. The first of the local leavers was Peter Lotis’ ‘Sunday Girl’ which lasted 15 weeks in the charts and peaked at 7. This was his best performing of his 3 hits to date.

Lauren Copley’s ‘Kentucky Blues’ had been the song which knocked the abovementioned ‘Never, Never, Never’ by Shirley Bassey off the top spot, but it left the charts in the same week. ‘Kentucky Blues’ lasted 19 weeks in the top 20 and like, ‘Never, Never, Never’ also spent 4 weeks at 1.

Last to go was Richard Jon Smith’s ‘That’s Why I Love You’ which had spent 17 weeks in the charts and peaked at 2. This was a far better performance that his only other hit to date, ‘Candlelight’ which peaked at 11 during a 9 week run.

Having recently turned 36 (he was born on 10 September 1936) Tommy Overstreet was the first of our new entrants this week with his first SA hit, ‘Heaven Is My Woman’s Love’. He had taken the song to number 3 on the Billboard Country Music charts and 102 on the main Billboard charts. Billy Forrest would record an Afrikaans version of the song in 1974.

Barbara Ray’s 5th hit was ‘Funny Face’ which entered the charts at 18 this week. It was a cover of the song written and recorded by US country singer Donna Fargo. Fargo’s version made it to the top of the Billboard Country charts and reached 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. Ray was the 11th local act to reach 5 hits in the charts and she was now just 1 behind Virginia Lee who held the record to date for local women. Assuming the highest new entry entered the charts first, the second highest second etc, then ‘Funny Face’ qualifies as the 200th local song to make the charts.

Osmosis struck gold with ‘She (Couldn’t Remember My Name)’ as it made it to number 2 on the Australian charts. This week they were a new entry on our charts. The song was an English version of an Italian song called ‘Vado Via’ which was recorded by Drupi and reached number 3 in France, 17 in the UK and 88 in the US. Abba’s Frida recorded a Swedish version called ‘Aldrig Mej’ and Tony Christie reached number 29 in New Zealand with an English version entitled ‘Words’. There are some questions over exactly where Osmosis came from, but no information about the band itself. The single notes that it was recorded in South Africa and it is arranged by a guy called Werner Krupski whose name may not sound South African, but he worked with a number of SA acts, including Maria (this week’s chart topping artist), Mimi Coertse and Gert Potgieter. He also has arranger credits on John & Philipa Copper’s ‘The Copperville Times’ and Eddie Calvert’s ‘A Rambler On Safari’ which the international star recorded in South Africa. Given the note about where the song was recorded and the fact that the arranger was South African based, I have treated Osmosis as local.

The last new entry was Geli & Bill (Angelika Illman and Billy Forrest) with ‘Do You Love Me’. This was Billy’s 9th appearance on the chart, but his first as part of a duet with Geli. The song was written by Kurt Hertha (who had also had a hand in Freddy Breck’s ‘We Believe In Tomorrow’) and Sharif Dean, the latter recording a version of ‘Do You Love Me’. An American singer called Ken Bee also recorded a version.

Despite 3 of the leavers being local the 3 new local hits kept the tally for South Africa acts in the charts at 6. The Americans provided 8, the Brits 3, while Greece, The Netherlands and New Zealand brought us the other 3.

The Dealians became the 42nd act and 9th local one to reach the 50 weeks in the chart mark while Maria and Paul Simon celebrated reaching 30 weeks. The George Baker Selection saw their weeks count move on to 16 and they joined The Shuffles and Tee Set at the top of the list for weeks on the chart by an act from The Netherlands.

Barbara Ray and Lauren Copley had shared the top spot for weeks by a local woman, but with Copley leaving the top 20 and Ray having a new hit, Ray moved onto 55 weeks and now had position 7 on the local weeks count list to herself while Copley dropped to 8th. Maria’s 30 weeks put her tied 20th with Dickie Loader on the that same list.

Last week we saw Shirley Bassey’s ‘Never, Never, Never’ reach the 300 points mark and this week it was ‘Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree’s  turn as it moved on to 301 points.

Both versions of ‘Shamabala’ had been on the charts for 10 weeks each, bringing the song’s total weeks on to 20. So far 15 of the 32 songs that had charted with more than 1 version had reached a combined total of 20 weeks.

The average number of weeks that the top 20 songs had been with us dropped from 10.7 last week to 8.05 this week and this would be the all-time record biggest fall in this figure, a drop of 2.65.

With Maria at number 1 and Geli & Billy at 20, this was the 20th time we had seen a local act at the top and bottom places of the chart.

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28 September 1973

maria-clap-your-hands-and-stamp-your-feet-epidemic

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 8 Clap Your Hands and Stamp Your Feet  – Maria
2 3 5 Baby Blue  – George Baker Selection
3 1 8 Take Me to the Mardi Gras  – Paul Simon
4 5 11 Ashes of Love  – Dickey Lee
5 4 7 One & One is One  – Medicine Head
6 8 16 Maori Love Song  – Double Vision
7 9 7 When Bouzoukis Played  – Vicky Leandros
8 10 9 Shambala  – B.W. Stevenson
9 7 18 Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree  – Dawn & Tony Orlando
10 15 4 I Wanna Live  – Tommy Oliver
11 12 14 Time  – Dealians
12 17 5 Long Train Runnin’  – Doobie Brothers
13 13 9 Shambala  – Three Dog Night
14 11 15 And I Love You So  – Perry Como
15 6 17 That’s Why I Love You  – Richard Jon Smith
16 14 19 Kentucky Blues  – Lauren Copley
17 18 15 Sunday Girl  – Peter Lotis
18 19 3 Born to be with You  – Dave Edmunds
19 20 2 Smoke on the Water  – Deep Purple
20 16 22 Never Never Never  – Shirley Bassey

Maria’s ‘Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet’ became the 15th song to regain the top spot after having dropped off it. Of those 15 there were 3 which regained the number 1 spot twice. Maria’s hit dislodged Paul Simon’s ‘Take Me To The Mardi Gras’ after the latter had been at 1 for 2 weeks. ‘Clap Your Hands And Stamp Your Feet’ had spent 2 weeks at 1 in its first run there so its total weeks at 1 now moved on to 3.

There were 2 songs that climb 5 places and this was the biggest climb this week.               Tommy Oliver’s ‘I Wanna Live’ moved up from 15 to 10 and The Doobie Brother’s ‘Long Train Runnin’, which had spent 4 weeks not doing much between positions 17, 18 and 19, suddenly had a popularity spurt and jumped 5 from 17 to 12. It was ‘I Wanna Live’s second week running with the biggest climber award. These 2 were the only star raters this week.

This week saw the 26th time we had a local act in the biggest climber and biggest faller lists as Richard Jon Smith headed in the opposite direction to Tommy Oliver. Smith’s ‘That’s Why I Love You’ fell 9 places from 6 to 15. This was the 3rd biggest drop in a week that we had seen by a local act with only Gene Rockwell’s 10 place drop with ‘Love’ and Barbara Ray’s ’11 place plummet with ‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ having seen bigger falls. In total we would see 9 local songs experience a fall of 9 or more places in a week.

Shirley Bassey’s ‘Never, Never, Never’ was still the oldest on the charts. It had been with us for 22 weeks and spent 7 of those as the oldest.

This week saw the 16th occasion when there was no movement on or off the charts. Included in the figure of 16 was a week where the charts were frozen over the Easter weekend.

There were 5 songs on the chart that had peaked at number 1 (including this week’s chart topper). We had seen weeks with 6 and on 2 occasions we had been graced with 7 chart toppers on the top 20. In total we had seen 62 weeks where 5 or more songs in the chart had managed to get to number 1. This week there was only 1 song in the top 20 that hadn’t yet reached number 1 but would do so in future weeks. This was not so uncommon as we had seen 47 weeks where there were no future chart toppers in the top 20 and a further 189 where there was just 1.

Vicky Leandros celebrated reaching the 50 weeks in the charts and was the 41st act and 7th woman to manage this. As she had been the only Greek act to chart so far, the nation’s week count total also moved on to 50 and was the 8th nation to reach this total. Greece moved ahead of Italy for weeks as the latter were on 49.

Lauren Copley moved level with Barbara Ray for weeks in the charts. The 2 of them sat on 54 weeks and were the leading local ladies. They were tied 7th highest on the local weeks count list. The Dealians shook off The Peanut Butter Conspiracy as their total moved on to 49. They still sat 9th on the local weeks count list while The Peanut Butter Conspiracy fell to 10th. The final bit of movement on the local weeks count top 20 was Peter Lotis joining Des Lindberg in 18th place with a 31 week total.

On the points front we saw Shirley Bassey’s ‘Never, Never, Never’ reach the 300 point mark and this was the 20th song to achieve this.

Double Vision’s ‘Maori Love Song’ was enjoying its 16th week in the charts overall and its 15th since re-entering the charts. This equalled the second best run by a song returning to the charts as both Springwater’s ‘I Will Return’ and The Rising Sons’ ‘How Do You Do’ had managed 15 weeks in the top 20 after returning to the charts. The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ held the all time record of 26 weeks.

‘Shambala’ had now accumulated a total of 18 weeks between the 2 charting versions. It moved into tied 18th place for weeks by songs charting in more than 1 version, sharing the spot with ‘Tchaikovsky One’ (Second City Sound and Omega Limited) and ‘I’m A Believer’ (The Monkees and Neil Diamond).

The average number of weeks that the top 20 songs had been with us was 10.7 and this was the 11th time that we had seen this average above 10 with the record to date being 11.5. We would not see this average go above 10 again in the top 20 era.

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