20 April 1973

we_believe_breck

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 11 We Believe in Tomorrow  – Freddy Breck
2 2 8 The Love in Your Eyes  – Vicky Leandros
3 5 11 I’m on Fire  – Maria
4 4 19 Woman (Beautiful Woman)  – Don Gibson
5 7 5 Can’t Keep it In  – Cat Stevens
6 3 14 I Don’t Wanna Play House  – Barbara Ray
7 6 10 You’re so Vain  – Carly Simon
8 9 5 The Morning After  – Maureen McGovern
9 10 19 I’d Love You to Want Me  – Lobo
10 16 5 Don’t Expect Me to be Your Friend  – Lobo
11 8 10 Blockbuster!  – Sweet
12 12 7 Daddy’s Home  – Jermaine Jackson
13 11 8 Candlelight  – Richard Jon Smith
14 18 3 It’s You (I Want to Live With)  – Peter Maffay
15 13 5 Killing Me Softly with His Song  – Roberta Flack
16 15 9 There are More Questions Than Answers  – Johnny Nash
17 New 1 Daniel  – Elton John
18 14 16 Home Isn’t Home Anymore  – Alan Garrity
19 19 2 Toy Train  – John Edmond
20 New 1 Harmony  – Neville Whitmill

Freddy Breck’s ‘We Believe In Tomorrow’ joined 3 other songs at the top of the list for weeks at 1 by acts not coming from the US, the UK or South Africa. ‘We Believe In Tomorrow’s 4 weeks at 1 equalled the run by Dutch band Shocking Blue’s ‘Venus’, Greek Vicky Leandros’ ‘Come What May’ and Italian Giorgio’s ‘Looky Looky’. We also had a 3rd week in a row with 2 acts who were not from the UK, the US or SA in the top 2 spots as Vicky Leandros’ ‘The Love In Your Eyes’ was unmoved at 2.

Lobo’s ‘Don’t Expect Me To be Your Friend’ was the climber of the week moving up 6 from 16 to 10 to give him his 3rd time with the award. Also moving up at star rater pace was Peter Maffay’s ‘It’s You (I Want to live With)’ which climbed 4 from 18 to 14 to give him his 4th star rater climb.

‘Home Isn’t Home Anymore’ by Alan Garrity picked up the biggest faller award for a second week running although this was the song’s 3rd time overall with the award. It dropped 4 from 14 to 18 (swapping places with Peter Maffay’s star rater mentioned above). Garrity was now the 10th act to have seen 7 biggest fallers and the only local act to do so (moving 1 ahead of The Staccatos who were sitting on 6).

Lobo’s ‘I’d Love You To Want Me’ and Don Gibson’s ‘Woman (Beautiful Woman)’ moved into their 5th week as the oldest on the charts as both songs enjoyed their 19th week with us.

Kenny’s ‘Heart Of Stone’ lasted just 1 week in the chart and spent that week at number 20. It was the 31st time a song had seen a run of just 1 week at 20 and the 23rd time where this would be the songs only chart action (the other 8 would either re-enter the charts or were re-entries). Kenny would be the 8th of 14 acts who would see their entire SA chart career consist of 1 song spending 1 week at number 20 during the top 20 era, with 1 of the previous acts, Tony Hatch, only managing this as one half of a duet with Jackie Trent. Trent did manage to have other hits.

Rabbitt’s ‘Locomotive Breath’ ran out of steam and left the chart after a total run of 14 weeks made up of an initial 2 week run followed by a 12 week one. During the 12 week stint it reached its peak position of 11. Rabbitt would return to the charts, but only after the line-up had gone through significant changes with only Trevor Rabin remaining from the line-up that recorded ‘Locomotive Breath’ which also included Errol Friedman, Francis Roos, Louis Forer and Cedric Samson. The latter 4 would go and be replaced by the familiar line-up of Trevor Rabin, Duncan Faure, Ronnie Robot and Neil Cloud.

Elton John’s ‘Daniel’ was the first new entry this week. This was his second hit in SA and like his previous hit, ‘Crocodile Rock’ (which had left the charts a few weeks earlier), it was co-written by Elton and Bernie Taupin. The song is about a Vietnam Vet returning home and trying to recover from his experiences there. In the wake of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York, this was included on a list deemed inappropriate to play on radio. The song topped the Canadian charts, made number 2 in the US and New Zealand, 4 in the UK and Ireland as well as going top 10 in Switzerland and Norway.

Neville Whitmill’s ‘Harmony’ became the 187th song by a local artist to chart and the 2nd by Whitmill, following up his 1971 hit ‘Get Me Some Help’. Whitmill had also seen chart action as a member of The Square Set who had 2 SA chart hits in 1967. ‘Harmony’ was written by Artie Kaplan and Nat Simon and the original version recorded by Kaplan was a number 3 hit in Italy. Ray Conniff also had success with the song, taking it to 3 in Holland, 20 in New Zealand and 61 in Australia. With the previous hit by Whitmill leaving the charts 60 weeks previously, this was the 14th biggest gap between hits we had seen so far by a local act.

For the last 4 weeks, acts from the UK and the US had been level for number of hits to date, but this week, The Poms pulled 1 ahead of the Yanks with the former accounting for 338 hits to date while the latter had produced 337.

Last week, 2 acts celebrated reaching the 30 weeks in the chart milestone (Lobo and Vicky Leandros). This week it was Peter Maffay’s turn. He was the second German act after Michael Holm to reach this level of weeks.

The Sweet held on to 17th place on the weeks count list as their 77 to date mean that Neil Diamond, whom they had shared the position with last week, dropped to 18th. On the local front it was Barbara Ray who moved up into 8th place where she was tied with The Bats on 45 weeks. John Edmond who had been on 45 last week, shook off The Bats and held position 7 by himself with 46 weeks.

This week we saw the 18th time that an act held adjacent positions in the charts as Lobo’s ‘I’d Love You To Want Me’ was at 9 and his ‘Don’t Expect Me To be Your Friend’ was at 10. So far Donovan, Four Jacks & A Jill and Middle Of The Road were the only acts to have seen this happen twice with Donovan the only one of those 3 doing it twice with the same pair of songs.

Alan Garrity set a new record for consecutive weeks in the charts has he had now featured on 45 top 20s in a row. This moved him past Middle Of The Road, the previous record holders. This record would stand for over 12 years and would only be beaten once the charts were extended from a Top 20 to a Top 30.

This week also saw the lowest count of groups in the charts as The Sweet were the only band in the top 20. The rest of the charts would be made up of solo artists comprising 13 males and 6 females. We would only see 1 other week where the groups were so poorly represented.

Youtube playlist

13 April 1973

we_believe_breck

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 10 We Believe in Tomorrow  – Freddy Breck
2 2 7 The Love in Your Eyes  – Vicky Leandros
3 4 13 I Don’t Wanna Play House  – Barbara Ray
4 3 18 Woman (Beautiful Woman)  – Don Gibson
5 5 10 I’m on Fire  – Maria
6 6 9 You’re so Vain  – Carly Simon
7 10 4 Can’t Keep it In  – Cat Stevens
8 9 9 Blockbuster!  – Sweet
9 14 4 The Morning After  – Maureen McGovern
10 7 18 I’d Love You to Want Me  – Lobo
11 12 7 Candlelight  – Richard Jon Smith
12 11 6 Daddy’s Home  – Jermaine Jackson
13 16 4 Killing Me Softly with His Song  – Roberta Flack
14 8 15 Home Isn’t Home Anymore  – Alan Garrity
15 13 8 There are More Questions Than Answers  – Johnny Nash
16 15 4 Don’t Expect Me to be Your Friend  – Lobo
17 18 14 Locomotive Breath  – Rabbitt
18 17 2 It’s You (I Want to Live With)  – Peter Maffay
19 New 1 Toy Train  – John Edmond
20 New 1 Heart of Stone  – Kenny

It was now 3 weeks in a row at 1 for Freddy Breck’s ‘We Believe In Tomorrow’ and this was a new record for weeks at 1 by a song by a German act, passing the 2 weeks that Peter Maffay’s ‘You’ (the only other German chart topper so far) had managed. Vicky Leandros’ ‘The Love In Your Eyes’ was unmoved at 2 giving us the second week we had seen where the top 2 songs were not by acts from the US, the UK or SA.

Apart from the UK, US and SA, there had been songs by acts from 6 other nations that had topped the charts and the total of 5 weeks that we had seen a German chart topper moved the nation into second place for weeks at 1 by a non-big 3 nation. They went 1 ahead of the Greeks and the Italians who were both on 4 and sat 2 behind the Dutch who were on 7.

Maureen McGovern didn’t seem to be suffering any effects of ‘The Morning After’ as her hit was the climber of the week, moving up 5 from 14 to 9. This was the second week running that it had taken the award. It was the only star rater this week.

Alan Garrity became the 2nd local act to see 6 biggest fallers as ‘Home Isn’t Home Anymore’ took the award this week with a 6 place plunge from 8 to 14. His 6 biggest fallers equalled that of The Staccatos and the 2 acts sat tied top of the list for local acts.

Lobo’s ‘I’d Love You To Want Me’ and Don Gibson’s ‘Woman (Beautiful Woman)’ were still the oldest songs in the top 20 as their weeks count moved on to 18. This was their 4th week as the oupa’s of the chart.

There were 2 leavers this week, the first of which was Hot Chocolate’s ‘You’ll Always be a Friend’ which had enjoyed a run of 10 weeks and peaked at 8. This fell 1 week short of their only other hit to date, ‘I Believe (in Love)’, but peaked 2 places higher than the 10 that their previous hit managed. There was more to come from them.

Also going was Kincade’s ‘Dreams Are Ten A Penny’ which spent 13 weeks in the top 20 and peaked at 4. This would be their only SA chart hit.

John Edmond returned to the charts with his 6th hit ‘Toy Train’. This placed him tied 3rd for number of hits by a local act, 1 behind For Jacks & A Jill and Jody Wayne who were on 7 and 2 behind leader, Billy Forrest on 8. ‘Toy Train’ was written by Dewayne Blackwell and was recorded by Lefty Frizzell and David Frizzell (David is Lefty’s younger brother and separate solo recordings by them seem to exist) as well as the Statler Brothers, however none of these US Country acts managed to chart in the US with their versions. Edmonds had now seen chart action (i.e. at least 1 week with 1 hit in the chart) every year now since 1970, that is 4 straight years. So far, only Edmond and The Dealians had seen chart action in every year from 1970 to 1973. In total we would see 5 acts have this 4 year run, with only 1 going back further than 1970. Of the 5 acts that would manage this, 3 would be local.

The second new entry was ‘Heart Of Stone’ by Kenny who were a group and not a person, although they were named after Tony Kenny, an Irishman who had recorded the song (written by Phil Coulter and Bill Martin – their 3rd SA chart hit). It was producer Mickie Most (who had spent some time living in South Africa) who renamed the band Kenny. They had been going under the name Chuff. They recorded ‘Heart of Stone’ and took it to number 11 in the UK. Including Kenny’s song, there have been 7 times where a song called ‘Heart Of Stone’ has charted in the US and UK combined. Of these, only the hits by Bucks Fizz and Cher, were the same song, all the others were completely different songs. The other artists who charted with a song of that title were The Rolling Stones, Taylor Dayne, David A. Stewart and Suzi Quatro. Kenny were an Irish band and this moved the number of hits by Irish acts on to 8. The Irish sat 8th on the list of number of hits by acts from a nation and were unmoved on that list, but it did mean that the French who were on 7, dropped into 9th place. Ireland was now 1 behind 7th placed Jamaica.

This week’s chart featured only 2 songs by acts from the UK and this was the lowest hit count in a top 20 that we had seen from them so far. In fact it halved the previous lowest as they had never been as low as 3 before.

Vicky Leandros and Lobo both celebrated reaching the 30 weeks in the charts milestone. They were the 71st and 72nd acts to manage this. Lobo had the added distinction of managing his 30 weeks without ever seeing a biggest faller in the week. 11 acts so far had managed this with 3 of them going on past the 40 week milestone and 1 of those, The Seekers, led the way with over 50 weeks without a biggest faller.

The Sweet moved into tied 18th place on the weeks count list as their total of 76 equalled that of Neil Diamond. On the local weeks count list, Barbara Ray moved on to 45 weeks and sat tied 8th with The Bats while John Edmond who had shared 7th place with The Bats last week, moved on to 46 weeks so sat 7th on his own.

Alan Garrity equalled the record to date for featuring in consecutive week’s charts as we had seen him in the top 20 for 44 straight weeks now which equalled the record set by Middle Of The Road. Garrity’s run had come with 29 weeks with ‘I Need Someone’ in the top 20, followed by 4 weeks where ‘Home Isn’t Home Anymore’ joined ‘I Need Someone’ and then 11 weeks so far with just ‘Home Isn’t Home Anymore’.

Lobo became the 27th act to see 2 or more in the charts for at least 4 weeks as ‘I’d Love You To Want Me’ and ‘Don’t Expect Me To be Your Friend’ shared space in the top 20. The record to date for multiple hits in the top 20 was 14 weeks which Four Jacks & A Jill managed.

Youtube playlist:

6 April 1973

we_believe_breck

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 9 We Believe in Tomorrow  – Freddy Breck
2 3 6 The Love in Your Eyes  – Vicky Leandros
3 4 17 Woman (Beautiful Woman)  – Don Gibson
4 2 12 I Don’t Wanna Play House  – Barbara Ray
5 6 9 I’m on Fire  – Maria
6 5 8 You’re so Vain  – Carly Simon
7 7 17 I’d Love You to Want Me  – Lobo
8 10 14 Home Isn’t Home Anymore  – Alan Garrity
9 8 8 Blockbuster!  – Sweet
10 16 3 Can’t Keep it In  – Cat Stevens
11 11 5 Daddy’s Home  – Jermaine Jackson
12 12 6 Candlelight  – Richard Jon Smith
13 9 7 There are More Questions Than Answers  – Johnny Nash
14 20 3 The Morning After  – Maureen McGovern
15 17 3 Don’t Expect Me to be Your Friend  – Lobo
16 19 3 Killing Me Softly with His Song  – Roberta Flack
17 New 1 It’s You (I Want to Live With)  – Peter Maffay
18 18 13 Locomotive Breath  – Rabbitt
19 13 13 Dreams are Ten a Penny  – Kincade
20 14 10 You’ll Always be a Friend  – Hot Chocolate

Freddy Breck’s ‘We Believe In Tomorrow’ enjoyed a second week at 1 and with Vicky Leandros’ ‘The Love In Your Eyes’ moving into second place we had the first occasion where the top 2 songs were by acts that did not come from the UK, the US or SA as Breck was German and Leandros Greek.

The climber of the week award was shared between Cat Steven’s ‘Can’t Keep it In’ and Maureen McGovern’s ‘The Morning After’ which both climbed 6 to land at 10 and 14 respectively. McGovern’s hit was the 15th to be a biggest climber after having suffered a biggest fall which it did last week. These 2 were the only star raters this week.

There were also 2 songs which shared the faller of the week award and they were Kincade’s ‘Dreams Are Ten A Penny’ and Hot Chocolate’s ‘You’ll Always Be A Friend’ which fell 6 to 19 and 20 respectively.

Lobo’s ‘I’d Love You To Want Me’ and Don Gibson’s ‘Woman (Beautiful Woman)’ were still hanging in the top 20 and enjoyed their 3rd week as the oldest in the charts with both songs having spent 17 weeks in the top 20.

Elton John’s ‘Crocodile Rock’ was the only leaver this week. It had seen a respectable run for a first hit of 11 weeks in the charts and peaked at 6. There was far bigger and better (performing that is) hits to come from Reginald Dwight as his mum would call him.

Peter Maffay returned to the charts with his second hit, ‘It’s You (I Want To Live With)’.  This was the 14th song by a German act to chart in SA. The Germans still sat 5th on the list of hits by a nation, they were 4 behind 4th placed Canada who had seen 18 so far. We had now seen 45 weeks where a nation outside the big 3 (UK, US and SA) had 2 in the charts as the chart topper this week was also by a German act. 3 of the previous 45 occasions had seen 2 non-big 3 nations having 2 in the chart in the same week.  So far 7 nations had managed 2 in the charts in the same week, but none had managed 3. The Canadians led the way for weeks with 2 as they had seen 15 with The Netherlands on 12 being second. Germany sat 4th with 7, 1 behind 3rd placed Jamaica who were on 8.

Maffay was the second German to see a second hit make the charts with Michael Holm on 4 leading the way. The gap of 61 weeks between Maffay’s 2 hits was the biggest we had seen between hits by a German act. As far as I can tell ‘It’s You (I Want To Live With)’ was only released as an English language song, which was quite unusual for the time where normally the English versions would be translations of songs originally written in German. If you have any information on a German version of this, please let me know. The song does include an instrumental interlude of Beethoven’s ‘Moonlight Sonata’.

Alan Garrity saw his weeks count hit the 60 milestone. He was the 4th local act to manage this, but he was still 8 weeks off 3rd placed Four Jacks & A Jill who were on 68.

The Sweet moved into tied 19th place on the overall weeks count list, joining Middle Of the Road there. Both acts were on 75 weeks. The UK accounted for 12 of the top 20 of the overall weeks count while the Americans with 7 and 1 local act (The Staccatos) made up the rest.

In terms of points, 2 local acts saw themselves going past milestones with Alan Garrity moving past 800 to 808 and Barbara Ray went past 500 to get to 506. Ray was the 41st act to get to 500 while Garrity sat 23rd overall. In terms of local acts, there were now 7 with a points tally of 500 or more.

Youtube playlist:

30 March 1973

we_believe_breck

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 8 We Believe in Tomorrow  – Freddy Breck
2 1 11 I Don’t Wanna Play House  – Barbara Ray
3 4 5 The Love in Your Eyes  – Vicky Leandros
4 3 16 Woman (Beautiful Woman)  – Don Gibson
5 5 7 You’re so Vain  – Carly Simon
6 7 8 I’m on Fire  – Maria
7 6 16 I’d Love You to Want Me  – Lobo
8 10 7 Blockbuster!  – Sweet
9 9 6 There are More Questions Than Answers  – Johnny Nash
10 8 13 Home Isn’t Home Anymore  – Alan Garrity
11 12 4 Daddy’s Home  – Jermaine Jackson
12 15 5 Candlelight  – Richard Jon Smith
13 11 12 Dreams are Ten a Penny  – Kincade
14 13 9 You’ll Always be a Friend  – Hot Chocolate
15 14 11 Crocodile Rock  – Elton John
16 17 2 Can’t Keep it In  – Cat Stevens
17 19 2 Don’t Expect Me to be Your Friend  – Lobo
18 16 12 Locomotive Breath  – Rabbitt
19 20 2 Killing Me Softly with His Song  – Roberta Flack
20 18 2 The Morning After  – Maureen McGovern

Before this week we had seen 7 songs top the chart where the artist was not from the US, the UK or South Africa. This week was the turn for number 8 as German Freddy Breck took pole position with ‘We Believe in Tomorrow’.  It was the second by a German act to make number 1 (the previous being Peter Maffay’s ‘You’) and Germany joined The Netherlands for most number 1s by a ‘rest of the world’ act. Last week’s number 1, Barbara Ray’s ‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ dropped to 2 after a run of 6 weeks there.

Richard Jon Smith’s ‘Candlelight’ became the 5th song that was the biggest climber in a week after having re-entered the charts and it took a climb of just 3 places from 15 to 12 for it to take the award. As the climber of the week was only 3 places, there were no star raters this week.

While it took a 3 place climb to be the climber of the week, song that dropped just 2 places this week found themselves being the biggest fallers. There were 4 songs which managed this and they were Alan Garrity’s ‘Home Isn’t Home Anymore’, Kincade’s ‘Dreams Are Ten A Penny’, Rabbitt’s ‘Locomotive Breath’ and Maureen McGovern’s ‘The Morning After’ which fell to 10, 13, 18 and 20 respectively. With Richard Jon Smith taking the climber award and Rabbitt and Alan Garrity being among the fallers, this was the 23rd time we had seen local acts take climber and faller in the same week.

Lobo’s ‘I’d Love You to Want Me’ and Don Gibson’s ‘Woman (Beautiful Woman)’ both moved on to 16 weeks in the chart and enjoyed their 2nd week as the oldest on the charts.

This week was the 6th time we saw no movement on or off the charts with 1 of the previous 5 being when the charts were frozen over what was the Easter weekend.

Hot Chocolate clocked up their 20th week in the chart and were the 111th act to manage this. Johnny Nash saw his total weeks move on to 34, but this week celebrated his 30th consecutive week with at least 1 song in the top 20. The 4 weeks difference between his total weeks count and his consecutive weeks count were the 4 when ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ and ‘There Are More Questions Than Answers’ in the charts in the same week. Nash was the 11th act to manage a run of 30 consecutive weeks in the charts.

Petula Clark dropped out of the top 20 overall weeks count list as The Sweet, whom she had shared 20th place with last week, moved 1 ahead of her with 74 weeks compared to Clark’s ‘73. Clark had been in the top 20 of that list for 346 weeks and reached a highest position of 3.

Apart from knocking Petula Clark off the top 20 of the weeks count list, The Sweet also saw their points total move past the 800 milestone as they ticked over to 805. This was the 22nd highest total so far.

Johnny Nash also reached a points milestone as he became the 40th act to reach the 500 point mark as his total was now exactly 500.

Peter Callender celebrated 100 weeks in the charts as a song writer and it was Alan Garrity’s ‘Home Isn’t Home Anymore’ that helped him to this total. He was the 15th song writer to reach a century of weeks in the chart.

Youtube playlist:

23 March 1973

house_ray

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 10 I Don’t Wanna Play House  – Barbara Ray
2 2 7 We Believe in Tomorrow  – Freddy Breck
3 3 15 Woman (Beautiful Woman)  – Don Gibson
4 5 4 The Love in Your Eyes  – Vicky Leandros
5 4 6 You’re so Vain  – Carly Simon
6 6 15 I’d Love You to Want Me  – Lobo
7 11 7 I’m on Fire  – Maria
8 9 12 Home Isn’t Home Anymore  – Alan Garrity
9 8 5 There are More Questions Than Answers  – Johnny Nash
10 7 6 Blockbuster!  – Sweet
11 10 11 Dreams are Ten a Penny  – Kincade
12 13 3 Daddy’s Home  – Jermaine Jackson
13 16 8 You’ll Always be a Friend  – Hot Chocolate
14 12 10 Crocodile Rock  – Elton John
15 15 4 Candlelight  – Richard Jon Smith
16 14 11 Locomotive Breath  – Rabbitt
17 New 1 Can’t Keep it In  – Cat Stevens
18 New 1 The Morning After  – Maureen McGovern
19 New 1 Don’t Expect Me to be Your Friend  – Lobo
20 New 1 Killing Me Softly with His Song  – Roberta Flack

It was now 6 weeks at 1 for Barbara Ray’s ‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ and this put it tied 3rd for weeks at 1 for a local song, joining Murray Campbell’s ‘Goodbye My Love’. Where Ray’s run at the top was consecutive though, Campbell’s was not. Only Hilary’s ‘Sunglasses’ (8 weeks) and Charisma’s ‘Mammy Blue’ (12 weeks) were ahead of them. Freddy Breck’s ‘We Believe In Tomorrow’ spent a second week at 2.

It was back in the November of 1967 that we last saw a run of 4 weeks where we had a solo female artist take climber of the week. Maria’s ‘I’m On Fire’ took the award this week with a climb of 4 from 11 to 7 to extend the current run of women climbers to a record equalling 4 weeks. ‘I’m On Fire’ was the only star rater.

The Sweet became the 4th act to reach double figures for fallers of the week as ‘Blockbuster!’ dropped 3 from 7 to 10 to give them their 10th such award. This was the 3rd time they had seen a 3 place drop give them the faller award and they had picked up 1 with a 2 place drop. The average places dropped of their 10 fallers of the week was 4.7. All 3 of the others who had seen 10 biggest fallers were averaging over 5, with Creedence Clearwater Revival having the highest average of 5.6, The Bee Gees second highest on 5.4 and Tom Jones in 3rd place with 5.2.

The leavers this week were Gilbert O’Sullivan’s ‘Clair’, The Dealians’ ‘Two Of Us’, Johnny Nash’s ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ and Lettab Mbulu’s ‘I Need Your Love’.

‘Clair spent 15 weeks in the charts and peaked at 6. There was more to come from O’Sullivan.

‘Two Of Us’ had managed 2 runs in the charts, initially only lasting 1 week then coming back for a 2 week run during which time it peaked at 17. There was still another hit in the Dealians’ tank.

‘I Can See Clearly Now’ would climb no higher than 3rd on the weeks count by a song list as its 28th week last week was its last. It could, however, boast the all-time record for weeks at 1 as it spent 13 weeks at the top of our charts. In total only 9 songs would reach double figures for time spent at the top of the charts and we had seen 3 of these so far (the other 2 being Charisma’s ‘Mammy Blue’ and Daniel Boone’s ‘Beautiful Sunday’). ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ spent 6 weeks as the oldest on the charts and Nash’s run of 4 weeks with 2 in the charts came to an end. The new oldest on the chart was shared between Lobo’s ‘I’d Love You To Want Me’ and Don Gibson’s ‘Woman (Beautiful Woman)’ which were both on 15 weeks. It had been half a year (26 weeks) since we last saw an oldest in the charts sitting on less than 20 weeks.

‘I Need Your Love’ by Letta Mbulu enjoyed a run of 17 weeks and peaked at 3. This was the tied 8th highest weeks to date for a song by a local woman and it would ultimately end up being tied 11th (ignoring positions 21 to 30 once the charts were extended). Mbulu would return to the top 20 at a later date.

On the new entry front, we saw Cat Stevens return to the charts with his 4th hit to date. ‘Can’t Keep It In’ was written by Stevens and managed to get to number 13 in the UK. It didn’t chart in the US but did make 36 in Germany and 5 in Norway. It was taken from the ‘Catch Bull At Four’ album on which our very own Jeremy Taylor helped compose and played Spanish guitar on the song ‘O Caritas’.

‘The Morning After’, the second new entry, was made famous by appearing in the film ‘The Poseidon Adventure’. The version in the film was not sung by Maureen McGovern. It was supposedly performed by Carol Lynley who played the character Nonnie, but was in fact sung by Renee Armand. McGovern was called in later to record the version that was released as a single and her version topped the US charts. The version in the film was only given a commercial release in 2010 when the complete score was put out by La La Land Records. The song went on to win the Best Original Song at the Oscars and was the 4th song that won that award to chart in SA (previous winners that charted were ‘Born Free’, ‘The Windmills Of Your Mind’ and ‘Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head’ ).

Lobo became the 44th act to have more than 1 song in the charts simultaneously as ‘Don’t Expect Me To Be Your Friend’ joined ‘I’d Love You To Want Me’ in the top 20. By this time, Lobo’s UK chart career was finished as he failed to chart there with ‘Don’t Expect Me To be Your Friend’ which was now his 3rd SA hit. His UK career would consist of only the first 2 hits he had in SA (‘Me And You And A Dog Named Boo’ and ‘I’d Love You To Want Me’). In the US, he was still charting and ‘Don’t Expect Me To Be Your Friend’ made it to number 8 there. He would have 5 further top 100 hits in the US. As with his previous 2 hits, Lobo (real name Kent LaVoie) wrote it.

The last new entry was Roberta Flack’s ‘Killing Me Softly With His Song’ which was her 2nd SA hit. The song was written by Charlie Fox and Norman Gimbel and was originally performed by Lori Lieberman. It describes the feelings Lori had when hearing Don McLean’s song ‘Empty Chairs’. Flack’s version topped the US and Canadian charts, made number 6 in the UK, 3 in Holland, 4 in Norway, 10 in Ireland, 19 in Austria, 30 in Germany and 32 in Switzerland and went on to claim the Grammy for song of the year. It was the 4th ‘song of the year’ to chart in SA, the previous one being Flack’s previous hit, ‘The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face’. The Fugees covered ‘Killing Me Softly’ in 1996 and took it to the top of the charts in at least 15 different countries (including the UK) and would just miss out in the US where it peaked at 2. We now had 6 solo woman in the charts, a record to date equalling number and was something we had not seen since November 1967, 279 weeks previously

Of the 4 new entries 1 was by an act from the UK (Cat Stevens) while the other 3 were all American. This meant that the Americans drew level again with the Brits for total number of hits with both nations supplying us with 337 to date. It had been 12 weeks since the 2 nations were last level and the UK acts had led the way for the intervening period. It was also the 4th, 3rd, 2nd and 1st hit respectively for Cat Stevens, Lobo, Roberta Flack and Maureen McGovern.

The Sweet’s weeks count moved on to 73 which just helped them into the top 20 of the overall weeks count list as they shared position 20 with Petula Clark. On the local list, Alan Garrity made 4th place his own as he went 1 week ahead of Billy Forrest, causing the latter to drop to 5th. Similarly Barbara Ray made 9th place her own with 42 weeks while Jody Wayne on 41 dropped into 10th spot.

The combined total of weeks in the charts of the 4 songs that left the top 20 was 63. This severely knocked the average number of weeks the top 20 songs this week had been with us as this dropped from 9.05 last week to 6.9 this week, a drop of 2.15 which was the second biggest decrease in this figure we had seen to date. It was the first time the average had dropped below 7 in 34 weeks.

Youtube playlist:

16 March 1973

house_ray

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 9 I Don’t Wanna Play House  – Barbara Ray
2 3 6 We Believe in Tomorrow  – Freddy Breck
3 2 14 Woman (Beautiful Woman)  – Don Gibson
4 4 5 You’re so Vain  – Carly Simon
5 12 3 The Love in Your Eyes  – Vicky Leandros
6 5 14 I’d Love You to Want Me  – Lobo
7 10 5 Blockbuster!  – Sweet
8 11 4 There are More Questions Than Answers  – Johnny Nash
9 8 11 Home Isn’t Home Anymore  – Alan Garrity
10 6 10 Dreams are Ten a Penny  – Kincade
11 20 6 I’m on Fire  – Maria
12 7 9 Crocodile Rock  – Elton John
13 16 2 Daddy’s Home  – Jermaine Jackson
14 13 10 Locomotive Breath  – Rabbitt
15 RE 3 Candlelight  – Richard Jon Smith
16 14 7 You’ll Always be a Friend  – Hot Chocolate
17 9 17 I Need Your Love  – Letta Mbulu
18 15 28 I Can See Clearly Now  – Johnny Nash
19 17 3 Two of Us  – Dealians
20 18 15 Clair  – Gilbert O’ Sullivan

Barbara Ray’s ‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ became the 5th local song to spend 5 or more weeks at 1 as it held on to the top spot this week. It also brought the total of weeks at 1 by local solo female artists up to the 20 week milestone. Don Gibson’s ‘Woman (Beautiful Woman)’ seemed to be losing in its bid to eventually make the top spot as it dropped to 3 while Freddy Breck’s ‘We Believe In Tomorrow’ climbed up 1 place into second spot.

For a 3rd week running we saw a song by a solo female artist take the biggest climber award as Maria’s ‘I’m On Fire’ jumped up 9 places to take the award. This was the 3rd time we had seen a woman as biggest climber 3 weeks in a row and this was 1 week less than the record run to date of 4. By the time the charts finished in 1989 we would have seen 5 occasions when a song by a local woman jumped up 9 or more places and Maria’s effort this week was the 4th such time with Hilary’s 10 place jump with ‘Sunglasses’ back in 1968 being the all time record. Overall this was the 7th time a local song had made a jump of at least this size and the 9th time a song by any solo female had managed it.

The only other star rater was also by a solo woman and that was Vicky Leandros’ ‘The Love In Your Eyes’ which moved up 7 from 12 to 5.

Faller of the week was Letta Mbulu’s ‘I Need Your Love’ which fell 8 from 9 to 17. This was the 22nd time we had seen a local climber and faller in the same week and only the second time the local climber and faller had both been solo female artists. The previous time this happened, Letta Mbulu’s ‘I Need Someone’ was the climber while it was Denise Freeman’s ‘A Shoulder To Cry On’ that was the faller. The 8 places that ‘I Need Your Love’ fell was the biggest drop to date that we had seen by a song by a local female artist. There would only be 2 more occasions where a local woman would see a fall of this magnitude and only 1 of those would be greater than 8 places.

Sitting on 28 weeks in the charts, Johnny Nash’s ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ had seen the 3rd best run in the charts to date by a song, sitting behind Alan Garrity’s ‘I Need Someone’ which managed 33 and The Staccatos’ ‘Cry To Me’ which managed 38. It was the 6th week that ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ had been the oldest in the charts.

Michael Jackson’s ‘Ben’ was the only song to depart the chart this week. It had lasted 12 weeks and peaked at 14. This would be the lowest peak for a song spending 12 weeks in the charts in the top 20 era. Jackson would of course go on to have bigger and better hits on our charts.

There were no new entries this week, but there was a re-entry and that was Richard Jon Smith’s ‘Candlelight’ which returned to the charts after just 1 week’s absence. This was the 42nd time a song had re-entered the charts with 4 of the previous occasions being where a song re-entered the charts for a second time. In terms of local songs, this was the 8th to be a re-entry.

With 7 local songs in the charts, this was the 40th week where the locals had more hits in the top 20 than any other nation with the Americans having 6, the Brits 4 while Germany, Greece and Ireland supplied 1 hit each.

Alan Garrity reached the 40 consecutive weeks in the charts milestone and was only the second act to manage this with Middle Of The Road being the previous ones to do so. They went on to spend 44 consecutive weeks in the charts. Overall Garrity’s week count moved on to 57 which put him tied 4th on the local weeks count list, sharing the spot with Billy Forrest.

Barbara Ray joined Jody Wayne on 41 weeks and they sat 9th for local weeks count. The Dealians moved on to 35 weeks and shared 14th place on that list with Lauren Copley.

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9 March 1973

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Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 I Don’t Wanna Play House  – Barbara Ray
2 2 13 Woman (Beautiful Woman)  – Don Gibson
3 4 5 We Believe in Tomorrow  – Freddy Breck
4 6 4 You’re so Vain  – Carly Simon
5 3 13 I’d Love You to Want Me  – Lobo
6 5 9 Dreams are Ten a Penny  – Kincade
7 9 8 Crocodile Rock  – Elton John
8 7 10 Home Isn’t Home Anymore  – Alan Garrity
9 10 16 I Need Your Love  – Letta Mbulu
10 11 4 Blockbuster!  – Sweet
11 18 3 There are More Questions Than Answers  – Johnny Nash
12 20 2 The Love in Your Eyes  – Vicky Leandros
13 12 9 Locomotive Breath  – Rabbitt
14 8 6 You’ll Always be a Friend  – Hot Chocolate
15 13 27 I Can See Clearly Now  – Johnny Nash
16 New 1 Daddy’s Home  – Jermaine Jackson
17 RE 2 Two of Us  – Dealians
18 15 14 Clair  – Gilbert O’ Sullivan
19 14 12 Ben  – Michael Jackson
20 17 5 I’m on Fire  – Maria

‘I Don’t Wanna Play House’ by Barbara Ray clocked up another week at 1, bringing the song’s total weeks at 1 to 4. This brought the total weeks at 1 by songs by local artists up to 70. Don Gibson’s ‘Woman (Beautiful Woman)’ spent a frustrating 5th (non-consecutive) week at number 2.

Vicky Leandros picked up her second biggest climber award as ‘The Love in Your Eyes’ climbed 8 from 20 to 12. This was the 17th time a song by a solo female artist had climbed at least 8 places in a week with 8 of the previous occasions seeing a climb of more than 8 places, 3 of which were by local women.

Johnny Nash saw his 4th star rater climb as ‘There Are More Questions Than Answers’ moved up 7 from 18 to 11. It was the 60th time a song had climbed 7 or more places and not been the climber of the week.

Hot Chocolate’s ‘You’ll Always Be A Friend’  took the faller of the week award with a 6 place drop from 8 to 14. This was their 3rd time with the award.

‘I Can See Clearly Now’ by Johnny Nash was still the oldest in the charts and had been so for 5 weeks. It was sitting on 27 weeks which was the tied 3rd highest total to date for a song and shared 3rd place with Peter Maffay’s ‘You’ and Gallery’s ‘Nice To be With You’.

Richard Jon Smith’s first run in our charts did not last long as ‘Candlelight’ fell out the top 20 after just 2 weeks and a peak of 19. This would not be the end of the road for Mr Knockout as he would see further chart action.

Also leaving the top 20 was Rick Nelson’s ‘Garden party’ which lasted 16 weeks and peaked at 6. This ended his SA chart career with 2 hits to his name, a total of 36 weeks and 2 weeks at 1 with ‘I Need You’ which was the song at number 1 on the very first chart. Of the acts who featured on that first top 20 back in June of 1965, there would only be 5 left who would still be seen on the charts.

New to the charts was Jermaine Jackson (who will probably be best known for being Michael’s brother), with a cover of a US number 2 hit from 1961. ‘Daddy’s Home’ was written by James Sheppard and William Miller and it was the version by Shep & The Limeliters (of which Sheppard was a member) that took the song to those heights in the US. Jackson’s version made it to a respectable 9th position on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US. In 1981 Cliff Richard’s version went to number 2 in the UK. The arrival of Jermaine onto the chart meant that we had hits by siblings on the top 20 in the same week as Michael Jackson was at 19 with ‘Ben’. We had seen Robin Gibb chart at the same time as The Bee Gees (when Robin had briefly left the group), but had never seen siblings with solo hits in the same week. We would only see this happen once more.

The other song to come into the charts was the 41st time we saw a re-entry (5 of these occasions were a song re-entering for a second time) and was ‘Two Of Us’ by The Dealians. This was the 7th local song to be a re-entry.

Barbara Ray celebrated having spent 40 weeks in the charts in total while Johnny Nash was enjoying his 30th. Ray’s 40 left her in 10th place on the local weeks count list while Gene Rockwell, whom she shared the spot with last week, dropped into 11th place. The Dealians climbed into tied 15th place with Groep Twee on 34 weeks.

A last obscure stat was that with Maria’s ‘I’m On Fire’ at 20 and Barbara Ray at 1, this was the first of only 2 occasions where a local solo female artist was at number 1 and number 20 in the same week.

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