23 January 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 Lady in Blue  – Joe Dolan
2 2 7 Fattie Bum-Bum  – Carl Malcolm
3 3 13 Milky Ways  – Colombus
4 4 11 If You Think You Know How to Love Me  – Smokie
5 6 10 It’s Been so Long  – George McCrae
6 5 8 Feelings  – Morris Albert
7 7 6 Somewhere Between  – Tumbleweeds
8 9 5 You and Me – Me and You  – Main Ingredient
9 10 10 I Love How You Love Me  – Jonathan Butler
10 13 9 Bouncy Bouncy Bounce  – Lionel Petersen
11 8 11 Say Forever You’ll be Mine  – Dolly Parton & Porter Wagoner
12 12 5 I’m on Fire  – 5000 Volts
13 11 12 Sailing  – Rod Stewart
14 15 3 Hold Me Close  – David Essex
15 14 9 The Last One to Touch Me  – Barbara Ray
16 19 2 Darlin’  – David Cassidy
17 17 3 I Only Have Eyes for You  – Art Garfunkel
18 20 2 Shoes  – Reparata
19 18 3 This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)  – Natalie Cole
20 New 1 That’s the Way (I Like It)  – KC & The Sunshine Band

‘Lady In Blue’ continued its dominance as the Joe Dolan hit enjoyed a 4th week in pole position. Carl Malcolm’s ‘Fattie Bum-Bum’ was unmoved at 2 as was Colombus’ ‘Milky Ways’ at 3 and Smokie’s ‘If You Think You Know How to Love Me’ at 4. Excluding the week when the whole top 20 was unchanged for the Easter weekend, this was the 22nd time we had seen the top 4 unchanged. We had seen 8 occasions when the top 5 was the same as the previous week and once when the top 6 (the record to date) were all non-movers. Positions 7, 12 and 17 were also unchanged this week and it was the 16th time we had seen 7 or more non-movers in the charts with the 3 times 9 songs had stayed in the same position being the record to date (again excluding when the whole top 20 was unchanged).

David Cassidy picked up his 2nd biggest climber award with a 3 place jump from 20 to 16 with ‘Darlin’. It was joined by Lionel Petersen’s ‘Bouncy Bouncy Bounce’ which moved up from 13 to 10 to become the 21st song to pick up a biggest climber award after having been the faller of the week. Petersen joined Tom Jones in being the only acts so far to manage this with 2 different songs, Jones having done so with ‘I’m Coming Home’ and ‘Till’ while Petersen’s other song to do so was ‘Come Back Liza’.

Colombus’ ‘Milky Ways’ was still the oldest on the top 20, clocking up its 13th week with us.

Buttercup’s ‘Sha La La La’ was the only song to leave the top 20 this week. It had enjoyed a run of 3 weeks in the charts and peaked at 15. They had seen 1 other hit chart, ‘Baby Love Affair’, and between the 2 hits they had accumulated 12 weeks and the peak of 7 that ‘Baby Love Affair’ managed was the best they would manage as the departure of ‘Sha La La la’ heralded the end of their SA chart chareer.

Before this week, the songwriting team of Harry Wayne ‘KC’ Casey and Richard Finch had 41 weeks under their belts for being on our charts, and all of those had come with George McCrae as the artist. This week they finally charted as artist as well as songwriter as they were both members of KC & The Sunshine Band whose ‘That’s The Way (I Like It)’ entered the top 20 at 20. The song topped the US charts twice, firstly on 22 November 1975 and then was knocked off the top spot by Silver Convention’s ‘Fly Robin Fly’ and returned to the top 4 weeks later on 20 December 1975. This was their second US chart topper (the previous being ‘Get Down Tonight’) but their first SA top 20 entry. In the UK it managed to peak at 4, a figure which matched the number of UK hits they had had at that point. It also topped the charts in Canada and Holland. The fact that the song charted in SA is quite interesting given the conservative nature of the SABC at the time and there was some concern that the song was a little risqué given the meaning behind the lyrics, but chart it did. In 1984 Dead Or Alive recorded a cover version of this and took it to 22 in the UK and had a minor hit with it in Australia (#45) and Ireland (#23) as well as getting to 28 on the US Hot Dance Club Play charts

The gap between number of hits by American acts and British acts moved on to a new high of 25 with the former on 428 while the latter were on 403.

Barbara Ray moved into 3rd place on her own on the local weeks count list, her 82 putting her 1 ahead of Billy Forrest and 1 behind The Staccatos in second place. This also moved her up into tied 17th place on the overall list, sitting tied with Chris Andrews. Lionel Petersen made 15th place on the local list his own as his 44 weeks put him 1 ahead of Gene Rockwell who dropped into 16th place.

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16 January 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 5 Lady in Blue  – Joe Dolan
2 4 6 Fattie Bum-Bum  – Carl Malcolm
3 2 12 Milky Ways  – Colombus
4 3 10 If You Think You Know How to Love Me  – Smokie
5 5 7 Feelings  – Morris Albert
6 8 9 It’s Been so Long  – George McCrae
7 10 5 Somewhere Between  – Tumbleweeds
8 11 10 Say Forever You’ll be Mine  – Dolly Parton & Porter Wagoner
9 13 4 You and Me – Me and You  – Main Ingredient
10 6 9 I Love How You Love Me  – Jonathan Butler
11 7 11 Sailing  – Rod Stewart
12 14 4 I’m on Fire  – 5000 Volts
13 9 8 Bouncy Bouncy Bounce  – Lionel Petersen
14 12 8 The Last One to Touch Me  – Barbara Ray
15 17 2 Hold Me Close  – David Essex
16 15 3 Sha La La La  – Buttercup
17 20 2 I Only Have Eyes for You  – Art Garfunkel
18 19 2 This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)  – Natalie Cole
19 New 1 Darlin’  – David Cassidy
20 New 1 Shoes  – Reparata

‘Lady In Blue’ by Joe Dolan enjoyed a 3rd week at 1 and its biggest challenge came from Carl Malcolm’s ‘Fattie Bum-Bum’ which moved up 2 from 4 to 2 while the previous chart topper, Colombus’ ‘Milky Ways’ dropped to 4 from 2.

Main Ingredients’ ‘You and Me – Me and You’ was the climber of the week. It moved up 4 from 17 to 13 and this was also the only star rater this week.

There were 3 songs that shared the faller of the week award and they were Lionel Petersen’s ‘Bouncy Bouncy Bounce’, Rod Stewart’s ‘Sailing’ and Jonathan Butler’s ‘I Love How You Love Me’ all of which fell 4 places to land at 13, 11 and 10 respectively. It was Rod Stewart’s first time and Jonathan Butler’s second time with the award, but a 6th time for Petersen. Petersen became the 5th local act to see this many fallers and there would only be 2 more who would see at least 6. Alan Garrity on 8 and Barbara Ray on 7 were the only 2 who had seen more than 6 while The Staccatos and Jody Wayne shared 3rd place with Petersen.

Two songs left the charts this week, the first of which was Billie Jo Spears’ ‘Blanket On The Ground’ which had enjoyed a run of 7 weeks and peaked at 15. This equalled the lowest peak for a song spending 7 weeks on the charts with 4 other songs also managing this. The other 4 were Tom Jones’ ‘A Minute Of Your Time’, Robert John’s ‘The Lion Sleeps Tonight (Wimoweh)’, Alan Garrity’s ‘Good-Bye Mama’ and The Troggs’ ‘Little Girl’. ‘Blanket On The Ground’ would be Spears’ only SA chart hit.

We also bid farewell to Showaddywaddy’s ‘Three Steps To Heaven’ which had been with us for 12 weeks and peaked at 6. This was the first of 2 songs by them that would chart in SA. ‘Three Steps To Heaven’ had been the oldest song on last week’s chart and that mantel now fell on Colombus’ ‘Milky Ways’ which sat on 12 weeks.

David Cassidy followed up the success of last year’s ‘Get It Up For Love’ with his 4th hit in SA to date, ‘Darlin’. The song was a Beach Boys track from 1967 which made it to number 19 in the US and 11 in the UK. Cassidy’s version did not do quite as well, not charting in the US and only getting to 16 in the UK. Further comparisons in chart performances between versions was that the Beach Boys made 17 in Holland where Cassidy didn’t chart while Germany and Sweden saw the opposite in that the Beach Boys’ version didn’t chart but Cassidy’s made it to 38 and 17 respectively.

Joining Cassidy as newcomer to the chart was ‘Shoes’ by Reparata. The song was a cover of a 1973 song by Felix Harp. That version was called ‘She Didn’t Forget Her Shoes (Johnny And Louise). Reparata’s version uses the original Felix Harp backing track (remixed) and was simply called ‘Shoes’. The Felix Harp version didn’t really do anything, but Reparata’s made number 43 in the UK and 92 in the US. The song is sometimes attributed to Reparata & The Delrons and featured Mary ‘Reparata’ O’Leary on lead vocals. However, the recording of Shoes, does not include the members of The Delrons. Morrissey and Johnny Marr of The Smiths have said that this song was influential on their work. Reparata had last been seen on our charts 395 weeks previously when their hit ‘Captain Of Your Ship’ was in the top 20. This was the second biggest gap we had seen to date with Gene Rockwell and Cher, who had both seen a gap of 411 weeks between hits, leading the way.

With both the new entries being by American acts we saw the gap between the top 2 nations for number of hits move to a new record high with the US acts on 427 and sitting 24 ahead of the Brits who were on 403.

Brazil continued to climb up the list of weeks by acts from a nation as their 7 moved them into 18th place, pulling 1 ahead of Norway and sitting 2 behind Kenya which was on 9.

Dolly Parton became the 100th act to reach the 30 weeks in the charts mark. She was the 13th woman to manage this.

Another woman who was going places was Barbara Ray whose 81 weeks moved her into tied 18th on the overall weeks count list. She shared the spot with Billy Forrest, Cliff Richard, Manfred Mann and Middle Of The Road and was tied 3rd with Billy Forrest on the local list. Barbara also celebrated passing the 900 points mark. She was the 22nd act and 3rd local one to reach this milestone. She led the way overall for points for female artists.

Lionel Petersen climbed into tied 15th place with Gene Rockwell on the local weeks count list. Both acts were on 43 weeks.

Reparata’s ‘Shoes’ was the 3rd song to chart that had an item of clothing in the title. The previous 2 were Nancy Sinatra’s ‘These Boots Were made For Walking’ (also footwear) and Mungo Jerry’s ‘Long Legged Woman Dressed In Black’. In total we would see 9 songs chart where clothing appears in the title.

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9 January 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 4 Lady in Blue  – Joe Dolan
2 2 11 Milky Ways  – Colombus
3 3 9 If You Think You Know How to Love Me  – Smokie
4 11 5 Fattie Bum-Bum  – Carl Malcolm
5 7 6 Feelings  – Morris Albert
6 5 8 I Love How You Love Me  – Jonathan Butler
7 4 10 Sailing  – Rod Stewart
8 8 8 It’s Been so Long  – George McCrae
9 9 7 Bouncy Bouncy Bounce  – Lionel Petersen
10 12 4 Somewhere Between  – Tumbleweeds
11 6 9 Say Forever You’ll be Mine  – Dolly Parton & Porter Wagoner
12 10 7 The Last One to Touch Me  – Barbara Ray
13 14 3 You and Me – Me and You  – Main Ingredient
14 15 3 I’m on Fire  – 5000 Volts
15 16 2 Sha La La La  – Buttercup
16 13 12 Three Steps to Heaven  – Showaddywaddy
17 New 1 Hold Me Close  – David Essex
18 17 7 Blanket on the Ground  – Billie Jo Spears
19 New 1 This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)  – Natalie Cole
20 New 1 I Only Have Eyes for You  – Art Garfunkel

This week saw the 1st time we had 4 acts that were not from the UK, the US or SA in the top 5. At number 1 for a second week running we had Irishman, Joe Dolan’s ‘Lady In Blue’, Colombus whose ‘Milky Ways’ was at 2 was from France while Jamaican, Carl Malcolm was at 4 and Brazilian, Morris Albert was at 5 with ‘Fattie Bum-Bum’ and ‘Feelings’ respectively. Smokie’s ‘If You Think You Know How to Love Me’ at 3 was the only one from an act from the big 3 nations in the top 5.

One of those 4 in the top 5, Carl Malcolm’s ‘Fattie Bum-Bum’, was the climber of the week, moving up 7 from 11 to 4. This was the second time the song had taken the award and the 7th time a Jamaican had managed it. Of the 7 times a Jamaican had been the biggest climber, Desmond Dekker, Boris Gardiner and now Carl Malcolm had all managed it twice while James Lloyd was the only to managed it once. There were no other star raters this week.

Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner respectively picked up their 3rd and 2nd faller of the weeks as their duet, ‘Say Forever You’ll be Mine’ fell 5 from 6 to 11 to take the award this week.

The oldest song on last week’s chart, Typically Tropical’s ‘Barbados’ was 1 of 3 songs that left the chart this week. It had been with us for 14 weeks and spent 4 of those at number 1. This would be their only SA chart entry. The new oldest on the chart was Showaddywaddy’s ‘Three Steps To Heaven’ which was on 12 weeks.

Not too surprisingly, Bobby Angel & Barbara Ray’s ‘The Greatest Christmas Gift’ also left the charts as it was now 3 weeks since Christmas and we probably weren’t feeling as festive as we had been. The song lasted just 2 weeks in the charts and peaked at 19. Both Bobby and Barbra would return to the charts at a later date.

John Denver’s ‘I’m Sorry’ became the 38th song to have an equal weeks and peak figure as it left the chart after peaking at 8 and spending 8 weeks with us. 7,8 and 9 were now the most popular figure for an equal weeks and peak as they had each happened 9 times. Denver would also return to the chart at a later date.

David Essex had been having hits in the UK since 1973 and before ‘Hold Me Close’ reached the charts there, he already had 6 UK hits under his belt, all but 1 made the top 10 and ‘Gonna Make You A Star’ had made number 1. In South Africa, ‘Hold Me Close’ was his first to chart. He was not unknown to local music fans as he had had at least 5 songs make the LM Radio charts by then. ‘Hold Me Close’ knocked Rod Stewart’s ‘Sailing’ off the top spot in the UK and then spent 3 weeks at number 1. It would be Essex’s last number 1 there. The song was produced by Jeff Wayne who rose to fame a couple of years later with his musical adaptation of H.G. Wells’ ‘War of The Worlds’.

Not all the offspring of famous rock/pop stars who try following in their parent’s footsteps succeed. One of those who had a fair career of her own was the daughter of Nat ‘King’ Cole, Natalie Cole, who gave us our second new entry this week with her song ‘This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)’. The song made number 6 on the main US charts and topped the Hot Soul Singles charts there. Natalie went on to win the Grammy Award for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance for this song, ending Aretha Franklin’s 8 year domination of the award. To date Cole has had 18 songs reach the Billboard Hot 100, 8 of which made the top 20. ‘This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)’ made number 32 in the UK where she has managed 12 hits to date. Sadly Natalie died on 31 December 2015.

Art Garfunkel caught up with his ex-partner Paul Simon in terms of number of solo hits as ‘I Only Have Eyes For You’ became Garfunkel’s 2nd to chart in SA. (Simon’s 2 hits to date, ‘Mother And Child Reunion’ and ‘Take Me To The Mardi Gras’ had both topped our charts). The song was written in 1934 for a film called ‘Dames’ and had already gone to number 11 in the US when The Flamingos covered it in 1959. Garfunkel’s version topped the UK charts (knocking our other UK chart topping new entry this week – David Essex’s ‘Hold Me Close’ – off the top spot there) and going to number 18 in the US. The song also topped the Norwegian charts. Art came close to joining those who had seen a gap of 100 weeks between hits, but should have waited another 9 weeks to release his new song if he wanted to manage that.

Jamaica and France pulled ahead of Sweden for weeks in the chart by acts from those nations as they moved on to 82 with the latter still on 81. They now sat tied 9th on the list of weeks by acts from a nation. Brazil moved into tied 19th place on that list, their 6 weeks to date putting them level with Norway.

We saw 3 acts reach milestones in terms of weeks this week. Joe Dolan hit the 20 week mark, George McRae reached 40 weeks and Barbara Ray hit 80. So far 168 acts had reach 20 weeks, 67 had made it to 40 and 22 had managed 80. Ray was the 4th local act (after The Staccatos, Alan Garrity and Billy Forrest) to reach this total. She was also the first woman to do so and now sat 7 weeks clear at the top of the list for weeks in the chart by a woman with Petula Clark on 73 in second place.

Lionel Petersen joined The Rising Sons in tied 16th place on the local weeks count list. Both acts were on 42 weeks.

Silly fact of the week: David Essex was the second act to chart with a surname the same as a UK county, the previous one having been Keith Hampshire.

Youtube playlist:

2 January 1976

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 3 3 Lady in Blue  – Joe Dolan
2 1 10 Milky Ways  – Colombus
3 2 8 If You Think You Know How to Love Me  – Smokie
4 5 9 Sailing  – Rod Stewart
5 4 7 I Love How You Love Me  – Jonathan Butler
6 6 8 Say Forever You’ll be Mine  – Dolly Parton & Porter Wagoner
7 8 5 Feelings  – Morris Albert
8 7 7 It’s Been so Long  – George McCrae
9 10 6 Bouncy Bouncy Bounce  – Lionel Petersen
10 9 6 The Last One to Touch Me  – Barbara Ray
11 13 4 Fattie Bum-Bum  – Carl Malcolm
12 11 3 Somewhere Between  – Tumbleweeds
13 12 11 Three Steps to Heaven  – Showaddywaddy
14 16 2 You and Me – Me and You  – Main Ingredient
15 19 2 I’m on Fire  – 5000 Volts
16 New 1 Sha La La La  – Buttercup
17 15 6 Blanket on the Ground  – Billie Jo Spears
18 18 8 I’m Sorry  – John Denver
19 20 2 The Greatest Christmas Gift  – Bobby Angel & Barbara Ray
20 14 14 Barbados  – Typically Tropical

A new year brought a new number 1 in the shape of Joe Dolan’s ‘Lady In Blue’ which moved up from 3 to 1 to become the first chart topper by and Irish act and the 4th time we had seen a new number 1 on the first chart of a new year. It had taken just 3 weeks to get to the top spot and was the 15th song to manage this (16th if you include ‘Forget Domani’ which got to number 1 on the 3rd chart ever published). We had seen 2 songs get to number 1 in 2 weeks, the all time record. ‘Lady In Blue’ was the first by an act from the non big 3 nations to reach the top spot in 3 week. The previous chart topper, Colombus’ ‘Milky Ways’ had managed 5 weeks at 1 and this was the 3rd time we had seen an act not from the UK, the US or SA take over the top spot from another act not from those 3 nations.

5000 Volts’ ‘I’m On Fire’ took the climber of the week award with a 4 place jump from 19 to 15. This would also be the only star rater climb this week.

Typically Tropical’s ‘Barbados’ was the biggest faller for the second week running. It followed up last week’s 5 place drop with a further 6 place drop from 14 to 20. It was, however, the oldest song on the chart, having clocked up 14 weeks so far.

Glen Campbell’s ‘Rhinestone Cowboy’, which had been the oldest on last week’s chart, was the only song to leave the top 20 this week. It had seen a run of 14 weeks and this had taken it to a peak of 2. This ended the SA chart career of Campbell after having 2 solo hits and 1 as part of a duet with Bobbie Gentry. His weeks total was 28 and the number 2 peak of ‘Rhinestone Cowboy’ was the best he managed.

The new entry this week was local band Buttercup with their second hit ‘Sha La La La’ which followed up the success of ‘Baby Love Affair’. Like their previous hit, it was also written by Ken Levine and Ernie Schroder, but it also included Ernie’s brother Robert in the writing credits this time. Robert had produced ‘Baby Love Affair’. Ken Levine has said that he thinks the voice used for the spoken parts of the song was that of LM Radio DJ John Novick. This was the 18th song to chart that contained no letters from the phrase ‘Top twenty’.

This week saw the 8th and final time that the number of hits by acts from the UK, the US and SA would have same no of hits in the charts as all 3 nations had 5 songs by their representatives in the top 20. Of the 8 times, 6 were when each nation had 6 and this was the second time when each nation had 5.

France and Jamaica, which both had acts represented on the charts, saw their weeks counts tick over to 81 and they sat tied with Sweden in 9th place for weeks by acts from a nation. We also saw Morris Albert help the weeks count for Brazilian acts move on to 5 and they pulled 1 ahead of Israel and moved into 20th place on their own. Israel were bottom of the list in21st place on 4 weeks.

Jonathan Butler became the 45th local act to celebrate reaching the 20 weeks in the chart mark. Further up the local weeks count list we saw Barbara Ray pull 1 ahead of Four Jacks & A Jill. Ray was on 79 and sat in 4th place while Four Jacks & A Jill on 78 weeks fell into 5th place.

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1975 THE FACTS AND FIGURES

We’ve now finished with the 1975 charts and all that’s left is for us to wrap up the year by letting you know who the shakers and movers were back then.

There were 128 songs that spent at least 1 week in the charts during the year and this was the highest number we had seen since the 135 we saw in 1971. The most we saw in the intervening years was 117 in 1972. 1969 still held the record for the most hits as we saw 153 that year and 1975 was the 7th highest of the 10 full years we had had so far. The 111 acts that brought us these songs was the 3rd highest in value we had seen so far although 1970 and 1971 shared the highest number of 114 and the 112 that 1969 gave us were above it so it was the 4th best year overall. The figure of 111 counts the acts who charted as duets separately, however, if we count a duet as a single act, then this figure would be 108. The hits per artist ratio equalled the lowest we had seen to date of 1.15 which we had also seen in 1974. Taking this to one more decimal place, then 1974 was the lowest on 1.150 with 1975 coming in at 1.153. The table below sets out the figures for these stats by years:

Year No Of Hits No Of acts Hits/Act
1965 79 55 1.44
1966 136 97 1.40
1967 146 98 1.49
1968 142 97 1.46
1969 153 112 1.37
1970 141 114 1.24
1971 135 114 1.18
1972 117 97 1.21
1973 103 87 1.18
1974 115 100 1.15
1975 128 111 1.15

The local acts brought us 26 of the 128 songs and this was the lowest we had seen from them since the 14 that 1969 brought us. 1971’s 41 was still the record to date. There were 21 acts needed to bring us the 28 hits.

TOP HITS

Based on a points system of 20 points for a number 1 position, 19 for number 2 etc down to 1 for position 20, the following are the top 40 chart performers for the year (Note: this does not reflect sales):

Pos Song Artist Points
1 You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet Bachman-Turner Overdrive 299
2 Love Hurts Nazareth 292
3 She’s a Woman Neil Herbert 266
4 As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty 264
5 You Ask Me To Bobby Angel 227
6 Fox on the Run Sweet 215
7 Stand by Me John Lennon 207
8 Don’t You Know Della Reese 206
9 Barbados Typically Tropical 204
10 I Can Help Billy Swan 202
11 S.O.S. ABBA 201
12 I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do ABBA 200
13 Paloma Blanca George Baker Selection 197
=14 Please Mr. Postman Carpenters 194
=14 Lady Styx 194
16 Longfellow Serenade Neil Diamond 188
17 You’re the First, the Last, My Everything Barry White 187
18 Please Stay Jonathan Butler 183
=19 Love will Keep Us Together Captain & Tennille 180
=19 Rhinestone Cowboy Glen Campbell 180
21 I Don’t Love You, But I Think I Like You Gilbert O’ Sullivan 175
22 You Lay so Easy on My Mind Andy Williams 169
23 The Look in Your Eyes Johnny Nash 158
24 Ms Grace Tymes 154
25 Shame, Shame, Shame Shirley & Company 153
=26 Mandy Barry Manilow 151
=26 Milky Ways Colombus 151
28 You Make Me Feel Brand New Stylistics 146
29 Help Me My Love After All 141
30 If Telly Savalas 140
31 Misty Ray Stevens 138
32 Hey You Bachman-Turner Overdrive 136
33 Hurt so Good Susan Cadogan 132
34 Junior’s Farm Paul McCartney 127
35 Before the Next Teardrop Falls Bobby Angel 123
36 Bye Bye Baby Bay City Rollers 121
37 Sailing Rod Stewart 118
38 Kung Fu Fighting Carl Douglas 116
39 When Will I See You Again Three Degrees 115
40 In the Summernight Teach In 111

You can compare this to the list published in Top 40 magazine in 1989 which can be found here:

Top 40 Magazine 1975 List

Bachman-Turner Overdrive’s ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’ was the 3rd song by an act not from the US, the UK or SA to be the top song of the year and it was the first such song to not be by a German act. The previous 2 non big 3 songs which had topped the list for the year were Peter Maffay’s ‘You’ in 1971 and Freddy Breck’s ‘We Believe in Tomorrow’ in 1973. Both of these acts were German. So far we had seen 4 songs of the year be by local acts, 3 by American acts and 1 by British acts with the aforementioned Germans and Canadian act making up the balance. The 299 points that ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’ was the 6th highest we had seen for a winning song and the 17th best in a calendar year overall.

The cumulative points to date gave the following top 10 which was unchanged from the end of 1974:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 I Need Someone Alan Garrity 464
2 I Can See Clearly Now Johnny Nash 448
3 Cry to Me Staccatos 447
4 You Peter Maffay 399
5 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday Jessica Jones 391
5 We Believe in Tomorrow Freddy Breck 376
7 Woman (Beautiful Woman) Don Gibson 373
=8 Sylvia’s Mother Dr. Hook 363
=8 Beautiful Sunday Daniel Boone 363
10 Nice to be with You Gallery 359

The top songs pointswise on the local front for 1975 were as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 She’s a Woman Neil Herbert 266
2 You Ask Me To Bobby Angel 227
3 Please Stay Jonathan Butler 183
4 Before the Next Teardrop Falls Bobby Angel 123
5 Private Number Lionel Petersen 109

The previous 2 years had seen the first and second local woman have the top hit for the year. 1975 saw the 6th time the top local song was by a male artist. We had seen 3 years where a group had taken the honours.

Cumulatively from the start of the charts in 1965, the top 5 local songs were:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 I Need Someone Alan Garrity 464
2 Cry to Me Staccatos 447
3 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday Jessica Jones 391
4 Mammy Blue Charisma 347
5 I Don’t Wanna Play House Barbara Ray 336

NUMBER OF HITS

We had seen local acts top the list for number of hits to spend time in the charts in a calendar year (Alan Garrity in 1973 and Lionel Petersen and Billy Forrest in 1974) but they had all shared the top spot with other, international acts. This year Bobby Angel saw more hits spend time in the charts than any other act, taking top spot all by himself with 4 of his hits spending time in the top 20 during 1975. ‘You Asked Me To’ entered the charts on 17 January followed by ‘Before the Next Teardrop Falls’ which was a new entry in June. Then in November his hit ‘Don Junior’ came along and in December we saw ‘The Greatest Christmas Gift’, his duet with Barbara Ray managed to sneak onto the final chart of the year. The best in a year was still 5 hits which 5 acts (Engelbert Humperdinck, The Bee Gees, Archies, Percy Sledge, Neil Diamond & Middle of the Road) had managed. The Bee Gees being the only ones on that list which had managed 5 in a year twice. Abba, George McCrae and Gloria Gaynor all managed 3 hits in 1975.

Bobby Angel obviously was the top local act for number of hits since he was the top act overall. No local act managed 3 hits, but Lionel Petersen, Jonathan Butler and Barbara Ray all managed 2. Bobby Angel joined Four Jacks & A Jill and Dave Mills for most hits in a calendar year by a local act with Four Jacks & A Jill managing it in 1968 and Dave Mills doing so in 1971.

The top 3 acts for total hits to date was unchanged from what it was at the end of 1974 with Tom Jones leading the way with 17, Cliff Richard in second place with 15 and The Hollies in 3rd place with 14.

Billy Forrest still led the way for local acts with 11 (unchanged from the end of 1974), Jody Wayne was still in second place and he saw his total move up from 9 to 10 during the year. Barbara Ray joined Four Jacks & A Jill in tied 3rd place with 8.

WEEKS ON THE CHARTS

Abba and Bobby Angel shared the top spot for number of weeks spent on the chart in the year with both acts managing 32. They were followed by Bachman-Turner Overdrive on 28 and Gloria Gaynor on 23. This was the lowest number of week we had ever seen for the top act(s) of the year. The previous lowest had been 37 which we saw in 1967 and which Petula Clark, Engelbert Humperdinck and Tom Jones all managed. Abba had become the first non big 3 act to top this list when they did so in 1974 so were now also the only non big 3 act to top this list twice. Middle Of The Road’s 59 in 1972 was still the best we had seen in a year so far. Bobby Angel was obviously the top local act for 1975.

The top 3 overall on a cumulative basis was unchanged from the end of 1974 with Tom Jones on 194 leading the way, The Hollies on 136 in second place and The Bee Gees in 3rd place on 125.

The highest place local act was Alan Garrity who sat tied 14th overall. Sitting on 84 weeks, he overtook The Staccatos who led the way for locals at the end of 1974. The Staccatos were the second highest local act on 83 and Billy Forrest was 3rd on 81.

NUMBER 1’s

After 3 years of not seeing any act have more than 1 number 1, Abba finally broke the drought and managed 2 in 1975, spending 4 weeks at the top of the charts with ‘S.O.S.’ and 2 weeks with ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’. There were 15 songs that spent time at number 1 during the year and this was the same number that managed it the previous year (1974) as well as in 1972. There had only been 3 years with less and those were 1965 (14 during 6 months), 1971 (14) and 1973 (13 – the lowest to date). 1969 still held the record when we saw 21 different songs manage to spend at least a week at 1.

There were 5 songs that spent 5 weeks at 1 during 1975 and this was the most any song managed. Those 5 songs were Bachman-Turner Overdrive’s ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’, Nazareth’s ‘Love Hurts’, Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty’s ‘As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone’, The Sweet’s ‘Fox on the Run’ and Colombus’ ‘Milky Ways’. It should be noted that ‘Milky Ways was at number 1 for the last week of the year so was the only one likely to manage further weeks at 1.

Bobby Angel’s ‘You Ask Me To’ and Neil Herbert’s ‘She’s A Woman’ were the only local songs to top the charts in the year with the former managing 2 weeks and the latter just 1. 1968 was still the best year for local chart toppers as we had seen 5 that year.

Tom Jones on 6, The Hollies on 5 and Chris Andrews on 4 still led the overall list for number 1 and this had not changed since the end of 1974. Four Jacks & A Jill remained the only local act so far to manage more than 1 chart topper as they had managed 2.

During 1975 we noted that The Sweet took over the lead for total weeks at 1 as their 19 took them past the 18 Tom Jones had managed. Jones had led the way since 20 January 1967 when he overtook The Beach Boys. He held the lead for 446 weeks and he was now in second place with The Bee Gees on 14 weeks in 3rd place. In terms of weeks at 1 by a song, we had already seen the all time record of 13 which Johnny Nash’s ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ had managed and the second highest of 12 weeks which Charisma’s ‘Mammy Blue’ managed.

LET’S HEAR IT FOR THE GIRLS

We saw 16 hits from female artists chart this year with a further 5 where a woman was part of a collaboration, giving them a total of 21 which was the tied 3rd highest they had managed. Without the help of the collaborative hits, it would be only their 5th best year to date. 1967’s 23 or 27 including collaborative hits was still the best we had seen. There were 13 acts that brought us these 16 hits (17 that brought us the 21 including collaborations).

Gloria Gaynor saw 3 hits spend time in the charts in the year and this was the best any woman managed. Olivia Newton-John and Barbara Ray managed 2 while the rest only managed 1 each. Petula Clark still held the record which was 4 in a calendar year and that was in 1967.

Cumulatively, Petula Clark still led the way with 11 hits to date despite us not seeing her on the charts since 1971. Barbara Ray on 8 was second overall and the top local woman. Nancy Sinatra, who also hadn’t been seen in the charts since 1971, was 3rd with 7. Virginia Lee on 6 was 4th overall and the second highest ranking local woman.

Gloria Gaynor won the weeks in the chart by a woman in 1975 award spending a total of 23 with us. She was followed by Loretta Lynn on 16 and Della Reese on 14. Cornelia managed 10 and was the top local woman with Sonja Herholdt on 8 and Margaret Singana with 7 in second and third places.

Petula Clark had led the way for total weeks to date at the end of 1974, but during 1975 she was overtaken by Barbara Ray who now led the way with 77. Clark was 2nd with 73 while Vicky Leandros was unmoved in 3rd place with 62. Ray was obviously the leading lady for locals with Lauren Copley in 2nd place on 54 and Maria on 49 coming 3rd. The order of the 3 local ladies had not changed since the end of 1974, the only thing that did change was Barbara Ray’s weeks count.

1975 was only the second year, after 1970 where there were no chart toppers by solo female artists but, like 1970, we did see a woman get to number 1 as part of a duet and that was Loretta Lynn who topped the charts for 5 week with her duet with Conway Twitty, ‘As Soon As I Hang Up The Phone’. So far Olivia Newton-John was the only woman to manage 2 solo number 1’s while Nancy Sinatra had managed 1 solo and 1 as part of a duet with her dad, Frank.

Hilary’s 8 weeks at 1 was still the most that a woman had managed with Barbara Ray having 6 to her name and Loretta Lynn joined Sandy Posey and Nancy Sinatra in 3rd place with 5.

The top 5 hits by woman in 1975 based on the points system were:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone Loretta Lynn & Conway Twitty 264
2 Don’t You Know Della Reese 206
3 Hurt so Good Susan Cadogan 132
4 (I Believe) There’s Nothing Stronger Than Our Love Paul Anka & Odia Coates 107
5 Another Love To Come Cornelia 98

On a cumulative basis, the top 5 read:

Pos Song Artist Points
1 Sunday, Monday, Tuesday Jessica Jones 391
2 I Don’t Wanna Play House Barbara Ray 336
3 Come What May (aka Aprés Toi) Vicky Leandros 321
4 It’s too Late Now Lauren Copley 303
5 Clap Your Hands and Stamp Your Feet Maria 302

NATIONALITIES

Aside from artists from the UK and US (who tend to dominate most charts worldwide), and local acts the following are the top hits from other nationalities:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet Bachman-Turner Overdrive 299 Canada
2 S.O.S. ABBA 201 Sweden
3 I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do ABBA 200 Sweden
4 Paloma Blanca George Baker Selection 197 Netherlands
5 I Don’t Love You, But I Think I Like You Gilbert O’ Sullivan 175 Ireland

With Bachman-Turner Overdrive’s ‘You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet’ taking the top honours overall for 1975, it was obviously the top song for acts that were not from the US, the UK or SA. This was the 3rd time that a Canadian act had topped this list and Canada moved ahead of Germany and Australia who had both topped the list twice. It was also the first time since Aussie band, The Seekers, had topped this list in 1965 and 1966 that we had the same nation take the honours 2 years running as it had been Canadian Terry Jacks’ ‘Seasons In The Sun’ that was top of the list in 1974.

We saw 24 songs by acts from the non big 3 nations spend time in the charts in 1975 which was by far their best effort to date as it smashed the previous high of 19 which we saw in 1970. Abba had seen 3 songs spend time in the charts last year and they managed this again in 1975 with ‘Hasta Mañana’ (which had been a new entry in 1974), ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’ and ‘S.O.S.’ all clocking up the weeks in 1975. Three hits was still the best that ‘Rest of the World’ acts had managed in a year with The Seekers managing it in 1965, 1966 and 1967, Lucille Starr doing so in 1967 and 1968 and now Abba in 1974 and 1975. On the overall hits count list, The Seekers still led the way with 7. Lucille Starr, The George Baker Selection and Abba all sat tied 2nd on 5.

There were more songs by acts from the US than from another nation to chart this year as they managed 48. British acts managed 30 while local acts managed 26. This was the 6th time the Americans had come out on top of this list with the Brits managing it 3 time and the locals twice. Canada and The Netherlands shared top spot for the rest of the world with both nations supplying us with 5 hits. Canada had now topped this list 5 times, sharing the top spot twice. Australia had been top 3 times while Germany had managed it twice.

There were 12 different nations represented across the 128 hits we saw spend time in the charts this year. This was tied second highest, beaten only by the 13 we saw in 1971. We had seen 12 in 1972 and 1973.

In terms of total hit count, the Americans were on top with 423 followed by the Brits on 402. Local acts had managed 260. The top for the rest of the world was Canada with 25 then Germany on 16 and The Netherlands on 15.

The cumulative best hits for ‘rest of the world’ artists was as follows:

Pos Song Artist Points Nationality
1 You Peter Maffay 399 Germany
2 We Believe in Tomorrow Freddy Breck 376 Germany
3 Come What May (aka Aprés Toi) Vicky Leandros 321 Greece
4 You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet Bachman-Turner Overdrive 299 Canada
5 Butterfly Danyel Gerard 276 France

WHAT DIDN’T CHART

In 1975 we certainly shunned the US and UK chart toppers in a big way as there were 41 song that topped the chart in either of both of those countries in 1975 that did not make our top 20. Of those 41, there were 3 that would eventually chart in SA. This smashed the previous record of 32 UK/US chart toppers not making our charts in the same year, 29 of which would never make our charts. 1974 was the previous record holder.

The 41 chart toppers in the US or UK or both that didn’t make our charts in 1975 were as follows:

(Hey Won’t You Play) Another Somebody Done Somebody Wrong Song B.J. Thomas
Bad Blood Neil Sedaka
Before The Next Teardrop Falls Freddy Fender
Best Of My Love Eagles
Black Water Doobie Brothers
Divorce Billy Connolly
Fallng In Love Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynold
Fame David Bowie
Fire Ohio Players
Fly, Robin, Fly Silver Convention
Get Down Tonight KC & The Sunshine Band
Give A Little Love Bay City Rollers
Have You Ever Been Mellow Olivia Newton-John
He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You) Tony Orlando & Dawn
Hold Me Close* David Essex
I Can’t Give You Anything (But Mylove) Stylistics
I Only Have Eyes For You* Art Garfunkel
Island Girl Elton John
January Pilot
Jive Talkin’ Bee Gees
Lady Marmalade Labelle
Laughter In The Rain Neil Sedaka
Let’s Do It Again Staple Singers
Listen To What The Man Said Paul McCartney & Wings
Lonely This Christmas Mud
Lovin’ You Minnie Ripperton
Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds Elton John
My Eyes Adored You Frankie Valli
Oh Boy Mud
One Of These Nights Eagles
Philadelphia Freedom Elton John
Pick Up The Pieces Average White Band
Shining Star Earth, Wind & Fire
Sister Gold Hair America
Space Oddity David Bowie
Stand By Your Man Tammy Wynette
Tears On My Pillow Johnny Nash
Thank God I’m A Country Boy John Denver
That’S The Way (I Like It)* KC & The Sunshine Band
Whispering Grass Windsor Davies And Don Estelle
You’re No Good Linda Ronstadt
* Would chart in SA in later years

I WRITE THE SONGS

There were 180 song writers whose names appeared on the songs that spent time in the charts this year. This was the 5th highest total we had seen to date. 1967 still led the way with 206 writers needed to bring us the songs that year. The most any one song writer accounted for was 3 hits and there were 8 that managed this. They were Bjorn Ulvaeus, Stig Anderson and Benny Andersson who brought us the Abba hits, Harry Wayne ‘KC’ Casey and Richard Finch (both of KC & The Sunshine band) who wrote George McCrae’s hits, Brian Holland (2 versions of ‘Please Mr Postman and Gloria Gaynor’s ‘Reach Out, I’ll be There’), Conway Twitty (the English and Afrikaans versions of ‘As Soon As I Hang Up The Phone’ and his own ‘Touch The Hand’) and Hans Bouwens who brought us all the George Baker Selection hits. The best a song writer had managed in a calendar year was 9 which Terry Dempsey who managed this in 1971.

Dempsey also led the way overall with 24 hits to his credit. Les Reed on 18 was second and Roger Greenaway and Jeff Barry were tied 3rd on 17.

The 3 guys who brought us the Abba hits, Bjorn Ulvaeus, Stig Anderson and Benny Andersson, saw their compositions spend more time in the charts than any other song writer this year as they managed 32 weeks. Randy Bachman on 28 was second with Brian Holland and Hans Bouwens on 25 with the 3rd highest weeks count. The 32 weeks that the 3 Swedes managed was the lowest total to take top honours in a year, beating the previous lowest of 44 which we saw in 1974 (this excludes the 29 we saw in the half year of charts in 1965).

Terry Dempsey was still way out in the lead for total weeks as he had 253 to his name. Les Reed on 168 was second with Barry Gibb on 151 taking 3rd place. This top 3 was unchanged from what it was at the end of 1974.

Benny, Stig and Bjorn were the only song writers to see more than 1 of their compositions top the charts. They had song writing credits on both of Abba’s number 1’s in 1975, ‘I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do’ and ‘S.O.S.’ and the 6 weeks in total that those 2 songs spent at the top of the charts was also the most weeks that a song writer managed. Neil Diamond led the way overall for weeks at 1 with 16 to his name. He was followed by Barry and Maurice Gibb on 15 and Robin Gibb, Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn on 14. In terms of number of number 1’s Chris Andrews, Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, Robin Gibb, Les Reed, Neil Diamond and Geoff Stephens had all seen 4 of their compositions hit the number 1 spot so far and this was the record to date.

THANKS

Finally, I would like to thank all those who have helped along the way through through 1973. Special thanks go to Peet van Staaden, Anton ‘Eagle-Eye’ van Staden and Ian McLean for supplying invaluable information and corrections as well as Chris Kimberly, Brian Currin, Stephen Segerman and Tertius Louw for being my go-to guys when I’m stumped.

26 December 1975

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 9 Milky Ways  – Colombus
2 2 7 If You Think You Know How to Love Me  – Smokie
3 7 2 Lady in Blue  – Joe Dolan
4 5 6 I Love How You Love Me  – Jonathan Butler
5 3 8 Sailing  – Rod Stewart
6 4 7 Say Forever You’ll be Mine  – Dolly Parton & Porter Wagoner
7 6 6 It’s Been so Long  – George McCrae
8 8 4 Feelings  – Morris Albert
9 12 5 The Last One to Touch Me  – Barbara Ray
10 11 5 Bouncy Bouncy Bounce  – Lionel Petersen
11 16 2 Somewhere Between  – Tumbleweeds
12 10 10 Three Steps to Heaven  – Showaddywaddy
13 15 3 Fattie Bum-Bum  – Carl Malcolm
14 9 13 Barbados  – Typically Tropical
15 19 5 Blanket on the Ground  – Billie Jo Spears
16 New 1 You and Me – Me and You  – Main Ingredient
17 13 14 Rhinestone Cowboy  – Glen Campbell
18 14 7 I’m Sorry  – John Denver
19 New 1 I’m on Fire  – 5000 Volts
20 New 1 The Greatest Christmas Gift  – Bobby Angel & Barbara Ray

We ended the year with Colombus’ ‘Milky Ways’ enjoying a 5th week at number 1 (the 38th song to manage 5 weeks at the top of the charts). This was the 8th week that a French act had topped the charts. Canada on 14 and The Netherlands on 17 were the only 2 non big 3 nations above them and they sat tied on 8 with Sweden. It was also the 5th time we had seen the song that was at number 1 at the start of December still being there at the end of the month. Smokie’s ‘If You Think You Know How to Love Me’ was unmoved at 2.

Climber of the week went to The Tumbleweeds’ ‘Somewhere Between’ which jumped up 5 from 16 to 11. This was the 15th time we had seen a biggest climber by a Dutch act.

Joe Dolan’s ‘Lady In Blue’ and Billie Jo Spears’ ‘Blanket On The Ground’ were both star raters, moving up 4 from 7 to 3 and 19 to 15 respectively. Dolan was the 9th non big 3 nation act to reach 5 star raters.

An ex-chart topper, Typically Tropical’s ‘Barbados’ was the faller of the week, dropping 5 from 9 to 14 while Glen Campbell’s ‘Rhinestone Cowboy’ enjoyed a 3rd week as the oldest on the charts as it clocked up 14 weeks with us.

There were 3 songs that left the charts this week. The first of these was 10cc’s ‘I’m Not In Love’ which lasted 5 weeks and peaked at 17. This would be their only SA chart hit, but we would see 10cc member Graham Gouldman’s name on another charting song where he would be credited as the song writer.

Paul Anka & Odia Coates’ ‘(I Believe) There’s Nothing Stronger Than Our Love’ lasted 9 weeks in the charts and peaked at 9. This would be Coates’ only SA chart hit and the last for Anka who had seen 1 other song chart (‘Goodnight My Love, Pleasant Dreams’). Anka had managed a total of 12 weeks in the chart and the song just leaving would give him his best peak.

Last to go was Conway Twitty’s ‘Touch The Hand’ which managed just 2 weeks and peaked at 17, a far cry from the chart topping and 16 weeks of his only other hit to date, the duet with Loretta Lynn, ‘As Soon As I Hang Up The Phone’

The first of the new entries was ‘You And Me – Me And You’ by The Main Ingredient, an American soul band. They managed 11 US Hot 100 hits, the highest placed of which was their 1972 hit ‘Everybody Plays The Fool’ which got to number 3, however, ‘You And Me – Me And You’ was not amongst the 11 songs that charted in the US. The song did appear on their 1975 album ‘Rolling Down A Mountainside’ the title track of which made 92 in the US.

‘I’m On Fire’ by 5000 Volts was our second new entry this week and should not be confused with the 1973 hit by local lass, Maria as they only had a title in common. The 5000 Volts song was written by Tony Eyers (Maria’s was by Ben Findon) and it climbed to number 4 in the UK as well as topping the charts in Germany, Belgium and Sweden. In the US it made number 26. The band featured Tina Charles on vocals. She would have a couple of solo hits on our charts later on.

Last of the new entries was a local duet comprising Bobby Angel and Barbara Ray with a seasonal song called ‘The Greatest Christmas Gift’. The song was written by Dallas Frazier and Earl Montgomery and recorded by George Jones and Tammy Wynette as a duet, but I have been unable to ascertain when this version was recorded. For Bobby Angel it was his 4th appearance on our charts while Barbara was enjoying her 8th top 20 outing which placed her tied 3rd on the list of number of hits by a local artist behind Jody Wayne on 10 and Billy Forrest on 11. She was still 3 behind the leading lady for hit count, Petula Clark, who was on 11. Barbara Ray also became the 9th woman and 3rd local woman to have 2 hits in the charts in the same week. The other 2 local women to manage this were Hilary and Jessica Jones.

Lionel Petersen celebrated his 40th week in the charts and was the 66th act overall and the 17th local act to reach this landmark. He sat unmoved  at 17 on the local weeks count list, 2 behind 16th placed The Rising Sons.

This was the last chart of the year and the 7th time we had not seen the Grammy Song of the year on our charts. The award for 1975 went to Judy Collins ‘Send In The Clowns’.

George McCrae was the only act to feature on the first and last charts of the year. He started the year with ‘Rock Your Baby’ sitting at number 16 and ended it with ‘It’s Been so Long’ at number 7. So far we had only seen 2 years (1971 and 1972) where there were no acts to feature on the first and last chart of the year.

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