29 September 1967

hollies_desire

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 7 3 That’s My Desire  – Hollies
2 1 8 She’d Rather be with Me  – Turtles
3 2 5 Carrie-Anne  – Hollies
4 5 5 Jackson  – Lee Hazelwood & Nancy Sinatra
5 3 10 Let’s Live for Today  – Grass Roots
6 11 3 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Tom Jones
7 6 8 The Airplane Song  – Royal Guardsmen
8 4 9 There Goes My Everything  – Engelbert Humperdinck
9 17 2 The World We Knew  – Frank Sinatra
10 8 11 I Take it Back  – Sandy Posey
11 13 6 Heroes and Villains  – Beach Boys
12 18 3 Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)  – Frankie Laine
13 20 2 Even the Bad Times are Good  – Tremeloes
14 15 4 Windy  – Association
15 New 1 Ode to Billy Joe  – Bobbie Gentry
16 New 1 Tabatha Twitchit  – Dominos
17 10 13 Silence is Golden  – Square Set
18 12 11 A Whiter Shade of Pale  – Procol Harum
19 14 7 Groovin’  – Young Rascals
20 New 1 Who’s Gonna Stand by Me  – Lucille Starr

The Hollies’ ‘That’s My Desire’ became the 6th song to take just 3 weeks to get to the top of the charts and it probably surprised the nation in doing so as last week it was sitting at number 7. It was just 2 weeks previously that The Turtles had set a new record for the biggest climb to take the top spot when ‘She’d Rather be with Me’ jumped up from 6 to number 1 and it was that song that gave way to the new number 1 and the new holder of the biggest jump to 1 record.

Frank Sinatra picked up his 3rd biggest climber award as his ‘The World We Knew´ moved up 8 places from 17 to 9. Not only was it the biggest climber in the top 20, but it would be the biggest Frank would ever managed (and that includes when he had Nancy to help him out). Not bad for a man who was approaching his 52nd birthday.

The Tremeloes’ ‘Even The Bad Times Are Good’ moved up 7 from 20 to 13 to be the next biggest mover up. This was followed by The Hollies’ ‘That’s My Desire’ (mentioned above) and Frankie Laine’s ‘Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)’ both with 6 place jumps. The final star rater this week was Tom Jones’ ‘I’ll Never Fall In Love Again’ which climbed 5 to 6. For The Hollies it was an 8th star rater while Jones equalled the 10 The Rolling Stones had managed to date and that was the highest any artists had managed so far.

2 weeks ago, The Square Set’s ‘Silence Is Golden’ took the biggest faller honours. This week the song picked up a second such award at it fell 7 places from 10 to 17.

Meanwhile its namesake, the song by The Tremeloes, would never get to be a biggest faller and this despite falling more positions than The Square Set’s versions this week. Confused? Well, what happened this week was that The Tremeleos’ song fell out of the top 20 from number 9 which means it must have dropped at least 12 positions, but for these sort of stats we don’t look at songs leaving the top 20 as we have no way of knowing what position they would have dropped to. This fall from grace equalled Engelbert Humperdinck’s ‘Release Me’s record to date for the highest last week position. ‘Silence Is Golden’ had managed 15 weeks on the chart and spent a record to date 7 of those at number 1. Their follow up hit was a star rater mentioned above.

Also leaving the top 20 was The Beach Boys’ ‘Then I Kissed Her’ which had lasted 12 weeks on the charts and peaked at 2. This broke their run of every second song going to number 1. Their peak record now ran as follows 1-2-1-2-2. It was also their lowest weeks count for a song so far being 1 less than the 13 both ‘Barbara Ann’ and ‘Sloop John B’ managed. With both The Beach Boys and The Tremeloes losing a song from the chart this week, we were left with just The Hollies having 2 in the top 20 at the same time.

Last to go was Petula Clark’s ‘Don’t Sleep in the Subway’ which had been with us for 6 weeks and peaked at 10. This was her lowest peak to date of her 6 hits.

With the departure of ‘Silence Is Golden’ (the Tremeleos’ song that is), the mantle of oldest song fell to ‘Silence Is Golden’, the one by The Square Set, which sat on 13 weeks.

Bobbie Gentry made her SA chart debut with ‘Ode To Billie Joe’ a song that she had written. It would be the only song with ‘ode’ in the title to chart on our Top 20. Like a good number of hits, the song started life slated for a b-side and ‘Ode To Billie Joe’ was also originally over 7 minutes long. However, the record execs saw the potential in it and a cut down version made the a-side of a single which would knock The Beatles’ ‘All You Need Is Love’ from the top spot in the US after the latter had only been there for 1 week. ‘Ode To Billie Joe’ would stay at number 1 there for 4 weeks. In the UK it would make it to number 13 and it would make number 8 in Zimbabwe. In 1976 Warner Brothers released a film based on the song. This sent Bobbie Gentry’s single back into the US charts, but in a weird licensing set up, both the original single released on Capitol records and one released on Warner Records would occupy the charts in the US at the same time. The Capitol version would go to 54 in this second run while the new Warner version would make 65. One wonders where it would have got to had the sales of the 2 different releases of the same song been added together.

The local content of the charts had been waning again with just The Square Set’s ‘Silence Is Golden’ being in the sole local representative on the top 20. This week The Dominos’ ‘Tabatha Twitchit’ arrived to double the local count. The band were a Joburg based group who would feature Una Valli on vocals at some point during its life. ‘Tabatha Twitchit’ was a cover of a Dave Clark Five song which was written by Les Reed and Barry Mason. This gave Reed his 6th hit to date as a song writer and that put him tied with John Lennon and Paul McCartney and the three of them sat behind leaders on the song writers hits count list, Mick Jagger & Keith Richards who were on 8. The Dominos version of the song had as its b-side a cover of The New Vaudeville Band’s big hit which never made our charts, ‘Snoopy vs The Red Baron’, so one could argue that the song did, sort of, make the top 20. For those of you who didn’t know ‘Tabatha Twitchit’ was a cat in the stories by Beatrix Potter.

Our last new entry was ‘Who’s Gonna Stand by Me’, the second hit for Lucille Starr. This would also be the 2nd hit for a solo Canadian artist. I say ‘solo Canadian’ as we had seen Steve Karliski, a Canadian, chart as one half of a duet. This was the 32nd song by a solo female artist to make our charts. This new entry moved Lucille on to 20 weeks on the charts, the 6th highest weeks count for a woman to date. She pulled clear of Connie Francis who was on 19.

The Turtles celebrated 30 weeks in the top 20 this week while The Hollies jumped up 2 places on the weeks count list as their 43 to date put them tied 9th with Tommy Roe. Nancy Sinatra, who was sitting second highest for a woman, moved tied 13th with The Mamas And The Papas as she clocked up her 39th week. On the local front The Square Set moved on to 13 weeks which placed them tied 14th with Dickie Loader.

Youtube playlist:

22 September 1967

rather_be_turtles

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 She’d Rather be with Me  – Turtles
2 3 4 Carrie-Anne  – Hollies
3 2 9 Let’s Live for Today  – Grass Roots
4 4 8 There Goes My Everything  – Engelbert Humperdinck
5 8 4 Jackson  – Lee Hazelwood & Nancy Sinatra
6 7 7 The Airplane Song  – Royal Guardsmen
7 12 2 That’s My Desire  – Hollies
8 6 10 I Take it Back  – Sandy Posey
9 5 15 Silence is Golden  – Tremeloes
10 10 12 Silence is Golden  – Square Set
11 20 2 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Tom Jones
12 9 10 A Whiter Shade of Pale  – Procol Harum
13 16 5 Heroes and Villains  – Beach Boys
14 11 6 Groovin’  – Young Rascals
15 18 3 Windy  – Association
16 15 6 Don’t Sleep in the Subway  – Petula Clark
17 New 1 The World We Knew  – Frank Sinatra
18 19 2 Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)  – Frankie Laine
19 13 12 Then I Kissed Her  – Beach Boys
20 New 1 Even the Bad Times are Good  – Tremeloes

When it came to songs, the one we would rather be with this particular week back in 1967 was The Turtles’ ‘She’d Rather Be With Me’ which was enjoying its 2nd week at the top of our charts. Pressure was coming in the form of The Hollies’ ‘Carrie-Anne’ which moved up 1 position to take second place.

Tom Jones became the 3rd act to pick up 6 biggest climbers as ‘I’ll Never Fall In Love Again’ moved up 9 from 20 to 11. To date this was the biggest climb we had seen by a Tom Jones hit and he shared the lead for most number of biggest climbers with The Seekers and The Beach Boys. The Hollies, who took last week’s biggest climber award with ‘Carrie-Anne’, supplied us with the only other star rater this week in the form of a 5 place climb with ‘That’s My Desire’.

While The Beach Boys shared the lead for the most biggest climbers, this week they supplied us with the biggest faller in the shape of ‘Then I Kissed Her’ which fell 6 places from 13 to 19. This was their 3rd biggest fall to date and this was only half the total of the top score of 6 that The Rolling Stones had.

The Tremeloes’ ‘Silence Is Golden’ continued its run as the oldest on the charts. It sat on 15 weeks. The other ‘Silence Is Golden’, the one by The Square Set, shared the second oldest song award with the biggest faller this week, The Beach Boys’ ‘Then I Kissed Her’.

George Jones’ SA Chart career was over just 3 weeks after it started as his only song to chart on our shores, ‘Walk Through This World with Me’ vacated the charts this week after 3 weeks and a peak of 16.

Joining Jones in leaving the top 20 was Tommy James & The Shondells’ ‘I Think We’re Alone Now’ which managed a far more respectable 10 weeks and peak of 8. However, this fell below the standard set by their previous hit (and only other to date), ‘Hanky Panky’ which had reached number 3 during a 13 week run. The good news for Tommy and the boys was that we would see them on our charts again.

We welcomed Frank Sinatra back on to our charts again as his new one ‘The World We Knew’ debuted at 17 this week. His previous 2 hits, ‘Strangers In The Night’ and ‘Somethin’ Stupid’, his duet with his daughter Nancy, had both topped our charts, so there was big pressure on the new one. However, the signs were not good as not only had both his previous hits topped our charts, they had also topped those in the US and UK while ‘The World We Knew’ faltered at 30 in the US and 33 in the UK. Perhaps one thing going for it through was that it was based on a Bert Kaempfert tune and he had always been a popular artist in SA. ‘The World We Knew’ did top the Billboard Easy Listening charts for 5 weeks, so there was hope for it yet.

The Tremeloes became the 22nd act to have 2 or more songs in the charts at the same time as their new hit, ‘Even the Bad Times are Good’ joined ‘Silence Is Golden’ in the top 20. This meant that we had 3 acts with 2 in the charts this week (the other 2 being The Beach Boys and The Hollies). We had seen 3 with 2 on 5 previous occasions and twice we had seen 4, but this was the first time we had had 3 or more acts with 2 songs in the charts for 109 weeks, the previous time being 13 August 1965 when we saw Herman’s Hermits, Tom Jones and The Rolling Stones have 2 in the chart. Of those 3, only Tom Jones had any representation on this week’s chart. ‘Even the Bad Times are Good’ would be The Tremeloes’ 11th UK hit where it went number 4. In the US it went to 36 and would top the charts in Rhodesia.

The Hollies celebrated their 40th week on the charts while Sandy Posey was enjoying her 30th. The Hollies moved into tied 11th place with Jim Reeves on the weeks count list while Sandy Posey sat 22nd overall and was the 4th highest placed woman.

We saw the 2 ‘Silence Is Golden’s sitting next to each other on the charts again with The Tremeloes at 9 and The Square Set at 10. As mentioned previously, this was only 1 of 2 pairings we would see where songs with the same title, but different songs sat next to each other on the charts.

Youtube playlist:

15 September 1967

rather_be_turtles

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 6 6 She’d Rather be with Me  – Turtles
2 1 8 Let’s Live for Today  – Grass Roots
3 8 3 Carrie-Anne  – Hollies
4 2 7 There Goes My Everything  – Engelbert Humperdinck
5 3 14 Silence is Golden  – Tremeloes
6 7 9 I Take it Back  – Sandy Posey
7 9 6 The Airplane Song  – Royal Guardsmen
8 12 3 Jackson  – Lee Hazelwood & Nancy Sinatra
9 4 9 A Whiter Shade of Pale  – Procol Harum
10 5 11 Silence is Golden  – Square Set
11 10 5 Groovin’  – Young Rascals
12 New 1 That’s My Desire  – Hollies
13 11 11 Then I Kissed Her  – Beach Boys
14 14 10 I Think We’re Alone Now  – Tommy James & The Shondells
15 13 5 Don’t Sleep in the Subway  – Petula Clark
16 15 4 Heroes and Villains  – Beach Boys
17 19 3 Walk Through This World with Me  – George Jones
18 17 2 Windy  – Association
19 New 1 Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)  – Frankie Laine
20 New 1 I’ll Never Fall in Love Again  – Tom Jones

The Grass Roots time at number 1 lasted 2 weeks. The new number 1 this week was The Turtles’ ‘She’d Rather Be With Me’ which not only made the biggest jump this week, but it was also the biggest jump to date to claim the top spot. The previous best was when The Troggs’ ‘With A Girl Like You’ climbed 4 places from 5 to 1. There would be 4 more songs that would make a 5 place jump to number 1 and 13 would manage it from a higher position.

The Turtles were not the only ones racing up the charts as The Hollies’ ‘Carrie-Anne’ climbed 5 from 8 to 3 to join ‘She’d Rather Be With Me’ in the biggest climb this week. Lee Hazlewood & Nancy Sinatra’s ‘Jackson’ climbed 4 to be a star rater but not the biggest climber for a second week running (always the bridesmaid, never the bride).

2 songs took the biggest faller award and they were Procol Harum’s ‘A Whiter Shade Of Pale’ and The Square Set’s ‘Silence Is Golden’ which both fell 5, landing up at 9 and 10 respectively.

The other ‘Silence Is Golden’, the one by The Tremeloes, was still the oldest on the charts. It moved on to 14 weeks with us.

Brook Benton’s ‘Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)’ deserted us after just 2 weeks, both of which had been spent at number 20. This was the 5th song to have a chart career of 2 weeks both spent at 20. This would be the sum total of Benton’s SA chart career.

The sun went down on Peter Lotis’ ‘Walking In The Sunshine’ as the song left the charts after 8 weeks and a peak of 10. Lotis fans could take heart from the fact that we would see Peter on the charts again.

Last to go was Jim Reeves’ ‘The Storm’ which lasted 6 weeks with us and peaked at 11. This was his second worst performer of his 5 hits to date, both in terms of peaks and weeks. Jim was, however, not finished with his SA chart career.

This week we saw the 9th song to debut at position 12 or higher on the charts. The previous one (which entered at 12) was The Hollies’ ‘Carrie-Anne’. This week The Hollies became the first act to manage 2 debuts at 12 or higher as ‘That’s My Desire’ arrived at 12 this week, a mere 2 weeks after ‘Carrie-Anne’ joined the top 20. ‘That’s My Desire’ was a song from 1931 which has been covered many times. The only chart success it had on the US Hot 100 was in1962 when Yvonne Baker & The Sensations took it to number 69 there. A version by Sammy Kaye did make it to number 2 there in 1946 in the days before the Hot 100. It has not charted in the UK. Apart from in SA, The Hollies version seems only to have charted in Rhodesia where it topped the charts. The Hollies now had 2 in the chart and were the 6th act to manage this with more than 1 pairing of hits.

While Brook Benton’s ‘Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)’ was leaving the charts, Frankie Laine’s was entering. This was the 11th song to chart in more than 1 version. Frankie Laine had taken his version to number 63 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US, 15 places higher than Brook Benton had managed. Frankie Laine’s hit ‘I Believe’ holds the all-time record in the UK for the longest run at the top of the charts as it managed 18 weeks there. He managed this with the run being broken twice for 1 week each time. Those who think it is Bryan Adam’s ‘(Everything I Do) I Do It For You’ that holds this record would be right if you were talking for consecutive weeks at 1 as that song managed 16 weeks in a row which is the second highest total so far. For more info on ‘Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)’ see the entry for 1 September 1967.

The final new entry was from Tom Jones and it was ‘I’ll Never Fall in Love Again’. The song was originally recorded by Lonnie Donegan who wrote it with Jimmy Currie, but it did not chart for Donegan. Jones took his version to number 2 in the UK and 6 in the US. This should not be confused with the Bobbie Gentry or Johnnie Ray tracks of the same name (which are both different songs).

For Tom Jones and The Hollies these new entries were their 7th hits which put them tied at the top of the hits count list alongside The Rolling Stones.

The Beach Boys moved closer to the Rolling Stones at the top of the weeks count list. They were on 76 and chasing 82. The Hollies moved tied 12th with The Mamas And The Papas, they were on 39 weeks. On the local front, The Square Set moved into 16th place with 11 weeks to their name.

Youtube playlist:

8 September 1967

grass_live

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 7 Let’s Live for Today  – Grass Roots
2 2 6 There Goes My Everything  – Engelbert Humperdinck
3 4 13 Silence is Golden  – Tremeloes
4 3 8 A Whiter Shade of Pale  – Procol Harum
5 6 10 Silence is Golden  – Square Set
6 8 5 She’d Rather be with Me  – Turtles
7 5 8 I Take it Back  – Sandy Posey
8 12 2 Carrie-Anne  – Hollies
9 7 5 The Airplane Song  – Royal Guardsmen
10 10 4 Groovin’  – Young Rascals
11 9 10 Then I Kissed Her  – Beach Boys
12 18 2 Jackson  – Lee Hazelwood & Nancy Sinatra
13 11 4 Don’t Sleep in the Subway  – Petula Clark
14 13 9 I Think We’re Alone Now  – Tommy James & The Shondells
15 15 3 Heroes and Villains  – Beach Boys
16 17 6 The Storm  – Jim Reeves
17 New 1 Windy  – Association
18 19 8 Walking in the Sunshine  – Peter Lotis
19 16 2 Walk Through This World with Me  – George Jones
20 20 2 Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)  – Brook Benton

The Grass Roots were beginning to take, erm, root at the number 1 spot as their hit, ‘Let’s Live for Today’ enjoyed a second week at the top of the charts. It kept Engelbert Humperdinck’s ‘There Goes My Everything’ at bay with the latter spending a second week at 2.

The climber of the week was ‘Jackson’, the duet between Lee Hazlewood and Nancy Sinatra. For Sinatra this was her 5th time with the biggest climber and this put her level with Herman’s Hermits, Manfred Mann and Tom Jones for number of times with this award. Only The Seekers and The Beach Boys who were both on 6 times, had managed more. The observant amongst you will realise that Sinatra now led the way for woman artists.

The Hollies picked up their 5th star rater as ‘Carrie-Anne’ moved up 4 places from 8 to 12.

It only took a 3 place drop this week to be the biggest faller and surprisingly only 1 song manage this and that was George Jones’ ‘Walk Through This World With Me’ which was one of our new entries last week.

Our recent record breaking number 1, The Tremeloes’ ‘Silence Is Golden’ remained the oldest on the charts as it entered its 13th week with us. Interestingly, the second oldest was the other ‘Silence Is Golden’, the one by local band The Square Set. It was on 10 weeks and shared second oldest honours with The Beach Boys’ ‘Then I Kissed Her’.

Herb Alpert’s ‘Casino Royale’ was the only song to leave the top 20 this week. It had been with us for 4 weeks and peaked at number.  This was not as good a showing as the previous Bond theme to chart, Tom Jones’ ‘Thunderball’, the latter making it to 007.

The Associations blew into the charts with their hit ‘Windy’. This was their first outing in our top 20. The song would spend 4 weeks at the top of the US Hot 100 and, contrary to what is says in the Wikipedia article on the song (unless this has been corrected since I wrote this), it actually knocked The Young Rascals’ ‘Groovin’ off the top spot there and not Aretha Franklin’s ‘Respect’. It would be replaced at the top of the Hot 100 by The Doors’ ‘Light My Fire’ (Wikipedia got that one right). The drums on this record were by Hal Blaine who also happened to have played them on The Beach Boys’ ‘Heroes And Villains’, our number 15 song this week. ‘Windy’ has been used in a number of TV shows including ‘Malcolm In The Middle’, ‘Life On Mars’ and ‘Breaking Bad’. It is also famously the piece of music that The Sex Pistols danced to as the credits of the BBC ‘Today’ show ran after their infamous Bill Grundy interview.

On the weeks count front, Engelbert Humperdinck clocked up his 20th. To put this in perspective of how the weeks had an accumulated so far, this placed him tied 35th overall.

Higher up the list, The Beach Boys pulled clear of Tom Jones to be 2nd on their own. They were now just 8 behind The Rolling Stones who led the way, but The Beach Boys were picking up 2 each week at the moment (having 2 hits in the charts). They also became the 7th act to have 2 or more hits in the charts for 6 weeks. Of the 6 other acts to have managed this, 5 had already accumulated more weeks. It was only The Mamas And The Papas that were still on 6.

The Hollies moved on to 37 weeks which meant that they drew level with Gene Rockwell at number 13 on the overall list. On the local front, The Square Set, as mentioned above, were enjoying their 10th week on the charts and this placed them tied 16th with John E Sharpe & The Squires.

For lovers of weird trivia, this was the 10th time we had seen the title of the top and bottom song on the chart start with the same letter as we had ‘Let’s Live For Today’ at 1 and ‘Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)’ at 20. As neither song had moved this week, this was therefore the second week running that we had had this phenomena. We had only seen this occur in consecutive weeks once before and that was when ‘I Was Kaiser Bill’s Batman’ was at number one. The first of the 2 weeks had The Thomas Groups’ ‘I’ve Got No More To Say’ at 20 and then the following week, while the number 1 song was unchanged, Cliff Richard & The Shadows’ ‘In The Country’ occupied the bottom position. For extreme trivia lovers, ‘L’ was now the most popular letter for this to occur with, having 3 times to its name. ‘S’ and ‘I’ had managed 2 each. And on that note, I’d better stop. Okay, just one more. There was one occasion when the first letter of both the song title and artist name were the same for the top and bottom song and that was when Sandy Posey’s ‘Single Girl’ was at 1 and the Staccatos’ ‘Spicks And Specks’ was at 20. All these stats exclude ‘The’, ‘A’ and ‘(‘ from the start of a song title.

P.S. I won’t comment on the fact that ‘Windy’ sat next to ‘The Storm’ on the charts and these 2 were just above ‘Walking In The Sunshine’. These weather forecasters can never get it right.

Youtube playlist:

1 September 1967

grass_live

 

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 6 Let’s Live for Today  – Grass Roots
2 5 5 There Goes My Everything  – Engelbert Humperdinck
3 1 7 A Whiter Shade of Pale  – Procol Harum
4 3 12 Silence is Golden  – Tremeloes
5 6 7 I Take it Back  – Sandy Posey
6 4 9 Silence is Golden  – Square Set
7 9 4 The Airplane Song  – Royal Guardsmen
8 11 4 She’d Rather be with Me  – Turtles
9 7 9 Then I Kissed Her  – Beach Boys
10 14 3 Groovin’  – Young Rascals
11 10 3 Don’t Sleep in the Subway  – Petula Clark
12 New 1 Carrie-Anne  – Hollies
13 8 8 I Think We’re Alone Now  – Tommy James & The Shondells
14 13 4 Casino Royale  – Herb Alpert
15 20 2 Heroes and Villains  – Beach Boys
16 New 1 Walk Through This World with Me  – George Jones
17 17 5 The Storm  – Jim Reeves
18 New 1 Jackson  – Lee Hazelwood & Nancy Sinatra
19 16 7 Walking in the Sunshine  – Peter Lotis
20 New 1 Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)  – Brook Benton

Procol Harum’s time at the top with ‘A Whiter Shade Of Pale’ was limited to 1 week by The Grass Roots’ ‘Let’s Live For Today’ which dislodged the former from the number 1 spot this week. ‘A Whiter Shade Of Pale’ fell to number 3. Just over a quarter of the songs vacating the top spot so far had fallen to number 3 (26.7% to be more accurate). The biggest majority (62.2%) had fallen to number 2 with 8.9% falling to 4 and 1 song (making up the remaining 2.2%) falling to 5. Engelbert Humperdinck’s ‘There Goes My Everything’ moved into 2nd place.

The Beach Boys drew level with The Seekers at the top of the list of number of times with the biggest climber as ‘Heroes And Villans’ moved up 5 this week to give The Beach Boys their 6th such award. The Young Rascals’ ‘Groovin’ moved up 4 to 10 to be a star rater for a second week running. This was the only other climb of 4 or more places this week.

Tommy James & The Shondells picked up their 2nd biggest faller award as the 5 place plunge to 13 this week by ‘I Think We’re Alone Now’ was the largest downward movement a song experienced this week.

We lost 4 songs from the top 20 this week, the first of which was The New Vaudeville Band’s ‘Finchley Central’ which had only managed 4 weeks with us and a peak of 14, their worst chart performance to date.  This ended the band’s SA Chart career and their statistics read 3 hits, 32 weeks with a best performance of 3 weeks at 1 by ‘Winchester Cathedral’. Their peak on the weeks count list was number 20 which was where they currently sat.

The oldest song on last week’s charts, Sandie Shaw’s ‘Puppet On A String’, was another of the 4 to go this week. It had spent 15 weeks with us, 1 of which was at number 1. This was the 4th highest weeks count for a song by a solo female artist. The new oldest song on the chart was The Tremeloes’ ‘Silence Is Golden’ which sat on 12 weeks.

Petula Clark’s version of ‘A Groovy Kind Of Love’ also left the top 20 this week. It had been with us for 9 weeks and peaked at 5, beating The Mindbenders’ version of the song which managed 6 weeks and a peak of 10. In total the song spent 15 weeks on the charts between the 2 versions, the 5th highest to date for a song charting in more than 1 version. The departure of Petula from the charts left us with just 2 solo female artists in the top 20, one of which was Petula’s other hit, Don’t Sleep In The Subway’, the other being Sandy Posey’s ‘I Take It Back’.

The final song to go was The New Christy Minstrels’ ‘Yamao Toko No Uta’ which managed a peak of 3 during the 11 weeks it spent with us. This would be their only SA Chart hit. In the US they would have 6 Hot 100 hits.

The Hollies joined the 7 other artists sitting on 6 hits, 1 below leaders, The Rolling Stones who sat on 7 hits. Their new one was ‘Carrie-Anne’ which arrived in the charts at number 12. This would be the band’s best debut position, which was 4 places higher than their previous best to date, and it would be equalled but never beaten. According to Graham Nash, he wrote the song for Marianne Faithfull, but he was too shy to use her real name. Allan Clarke and Tony Hicks were also credited with writing the song. It would get to number 3 in the UK and would be the last of a run of 5 top 5 hits in a row they would have there. They would have 3 further top 5 hits, but the run was broken with their following hit, ‘If I Needed Someone’ only making it to 20.

Country singer George Jones made his SA Chart debut this week with ‘Walk Through This World with Me’. The song would give Jones his 4th US Country Singles chart topper where it stayed for 2 weeks. Jones was widely revered in country music circles and would marry fellow country singer Tammy Wynette (his 3rd of 4 marriages). Despite battling with alcoholism, Jones lived to the ripe old age of 81, dying on 26 April 2013.

The 3rd new entry this week was the 10th by a duet to chart. Lee Hazlewood had teamed up with Nancy Sinatra before to give us ‘Sand’ and with their new hit, ‘Jackson’, they became the first pairing to have 2 hits on our charts. Nancy also topped the list for most hits as part of a duet as she had also had one with her dad, Frank, giving her a total of 3, 1 more than Virginia Lee who had had 1 with Slim Whitman and 1 with Murray Campbell. ‘Jackson’ would give the duo a number 14 hit on the US Hot 100 and would be Sinatra’s 5th SA hit to date, putting her 1 behind Petula Clark who led the way for woman in terms of number of hits. Johnny Cash & June Carter also recorded a version of ‘Jackson’ which would go to number 2 on the US Country Singles charts. The latter version would get renewed interest after its inclusion in the 2011 film ‘The Help’.

Our final new entry was ‘Laura (What’s He Got That I Ain’t Got)’ by Brook Benton. The song started life as a US Country Singles chart topper by Leon Ashley who co-wrote it with Margie Singleton. 2 versions of it made the US Hot 100 charts, one of which was Benton’s version which got to number 78 and it has made 3 further appearances on the Country Singles charts with Claude King (#50), Marty Robbins (#60) and Kenny Rogers (#19) all charting with their respective covers. Benton was born Benjamin Franklin Peay on 19 September 1931 and died from pneumonia on 9 April 1988 at the age of 56.

Jim Reeves reached the 40 weeks in the chart milestone which moved him into 11th spot on the weeks count list. The Beach Boys drew level with Tom Jones in second place on that list, both acts having 72 to their name. They were still 10 behind The Rolling Stones who we had not seen on the charts for 16 weeks, their second longest hit drought to date. Nancy Sinatra was in 15th place with 35 weeks to her name. She pulled 1 clear of Virginia Lee to be in second place on her own for a woman. Petula Clark who was on 46 led the way in that respect.

Youtube playlist:

25 August 1967

procol_whiter

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 6 A Whiter Shade of Pale  – Procol Harum
2 5 5 Let’s Live for Today  – Grass Roots
3 1 11 Silence is Golden  – Tremeloes
4 3 8 Silence is Golden  – Square Set
5 6 4 There Goes My Everything  – Engelbert Humperdinck
6 4 6 I Take it Back  – Sandy Posey
7 7 8 Then I Kissed Her  – Beach Boys
8 8 7 I Think We’re Alone Now  – Tommy James & The Shondells
9 11 3 The Airplane Song  – Royal Guardsmen
10 15 2 Don’t Sleep in the Subway  – Petula Clark
11 19 3 She’d Rather be with Me  – Turtles
12 10 11 Yamao Toko No Uta  – New Christy Minstrels
13 17 3 Casino Royale  – Herb Alpert
14 18 2 Groovin’  – Young Rascals
15 9 9 A Groovy Kind of Love  – Petula Clark
16 16 6 Walking in the Sunshine  – Peter Lotis
17 12 4 The Storm  – Jim Reeves
18 13 15 Puppet on a String  – Sandie Shaw
19 14 4 Finchley Central  – New Vaudeville Band
20 New 1 Heroes and Villains  – Beach Boys

The Tremeloes’ ‘Silence Is Golden’s record breaking run at the top of the charts finally ended. After monopolising the number 1 position for 7 week it was dislodged by Procol Harum’s ‘A Whiter Shade of Pale’ which climbed up from 2 to 1. So far 56.8% of songs getting to number 1 had done so from the number 2 slot (25.0% had done it from 3, 15.9% from 4 and 2.3% from 5). Over time, the jump from 2 to 1 would eventually amount to 64.8% of the moves to the top spot.

‘Silence Is Golden’ fell to 3 where it sat next to ‘Silence Is Golden’ at 4. The former being The Tremeloes’ song and the latter The Square Set’s. This would be the first of only 2 pairings where we would see songs with the same title, but different songs, sitting next to each other on the charts. We had already seen 2 versions of ‘Elusive Butterfly’ and ‘Lara’s Theme’ sit in adjacent spots, but those were different versions of the same song. We would see 6 more cases of the same song sitting next to itself.

‘She’d Rather be with Me’ by The Turtles was our climber of the week as it moved up 8 places from 19 to 11. This was their 4th time with the biggest climber and 8 places would be the biggest jump the band would ever experience.

Petula Clark’s ‘Don’t Sleep In The Subway’ moved up 5 from 15 to 10 while Herb Alpert’s ‘Casino Royale’ and The Young Rascal’s ‘Groovin’ both climbed 4 to get to 13 and 14 respectively. These were the other star raters of the week.

But while Petula was racing up the charts with one song, her other one, ‘A Groovy Kind Of Love’ was falling. It dropped 6 places to take the biggest faller in the week award.

Sandie Shaw’s ‘Puppet On A String’ moved on to 15 weeks in the top 20 and was enjoying its 4th as the oldest on the charts.

There was just 1 song that left the charts this week and that was the duet by Nicole Croisille and Pierre Barouh, ‘A Man and a Woman’, which had been with us for 3 weeks and peaked at 17. This would be the only song that either of the artists involved would have chart in SA. The departure of the song by this French act left us with just 3 nations represented in our top 20, The UK, The US and SA. The last time we had seen our top 20 consisting of hits from just those 3 nations was on 2 September 1966, just under a year previously.

The Beach Boys became the 8th act to clock up 6 hits on the charts as ‘Heroes And Villians’ arrived at number 20. Only The Rolling Stones on 7 had managed to go one better. When it was recorded, the song was intended for an album called ‘Smile’ which would be the band’s follow up to ‘Pet Sounds’ which is widely regarded as the band’s best album. However, the pressure of producing something to follow up the ground breaking ‘Pet Sounds’ took its toll on the band and Brian Wilson in particular and ‘Smile’ was never released. ‘Heroes And Villians’ eventually made it on to the somewhat hastily produced ‘Smiley Smile’. In 2011 ‘The Smile Sessions’ was released which aimed to collect together the tracks which would have made the ‘Smile’ album had it been released in 1967. As ‘Then I Kissed Her’ was still in the charts, The Beach Boys became the 5th act to have 2 or more in the charts at the same time with 2 different pairings. They had last had 2 in the charts when ‘Barbara Ann’ and ‘Sloop John B’ co-habited the top 20. ‘Heroes And Villians’ was the 105th song by a US artist to chart and the Yanks were catching up to the Poms as they were now just 4 behind the latter’s 109.

The Beach Boys’ new one moved them on to 70 weeks in total on the chart, but this was not enough to move them up the weeks count list as the one above them, Tom Jones, was on 72. The Beach Boys were therefore still sitting at number 3 with Tom Jones at 2 and The Rolling Stones (on 82 weeks) at 1. Tommy James & The Shondells celebrated 20 weeks in the top 20. Petula Clark was still in 8th place on the list with 45 to her name, but she had moved ahead of Tommy Roe whom she shared the position with last week. On the local front, The Square Set also remained unmoved (at 19), but shook off those it shared the spot with last week. They were on 8 weeks.

Youtube playlist:

18 August 1967

silence_tremeloes

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 10 Silence is Golden  – Tremeloes
2 2 5 A Whiter Shade of Pale  – Procol Harum
3 3 7 Silence is Golden  – Square Set
4 4 5 I Take it Back  – Sandy Posey
5 6 4 Let’s Live for Today  – Grass Roots
6 9 3 There Goes My Everything  – Engelbert Humperdinck
7 5 7 Then I Kissed Her  – Beach Boys
8 14 6 I Think We’re Alone Now  – Tommy James & The Shondells
9 8 8 A Groovy Kind of Love  – Petula Clark
10 7 10 Yamao Toko No Uta  – New Christy Minstrels
11 16 2 The Airplane Song  – Royal Guardsmen
12 11 3 The Storm  – Jim Reeves
13 12 14 Puppet on a String  – Sandie Shaw
14 15 3 Finchley Central  – New Vaudeville Band
15 New 1 Don’t Sleep in the Subway  – Petula Clark
16 10 5 Walking in the Sunshine  – Peter Lotis
17 18 2 Casino Royale  – Herb Alpert
18 New 1 Groovin’  – Young Rascals
19 19 2 She’d Rather be with Me  – Turtles
20 17 3 A Man and a Woman  – Nicole Croisille and Pierre Barouh

They did it! We had had 114 weeks of charts so far and 5 songs (including The Tremeloes’ ‘Silence Is Golden’) had made it to 6 weeks at 1, but this week, The Tremeloes took ‘Silence Is Golden’ into a 7th week at 1 and set a new record to date. They had seen off the pressure that Procol Harum’s ‘A Whiter Shade Of Pale’ was putting on them last week, but the latter was still sitting at 2, so 8 weeks for The Tremeloes was in question.

Tommy James & The Shondells’ ‘I Think We’re Alone Now’ was the biggest climber this week with a 6 place climb from 14 to 8. This was the song’s second time as biggest climber having managed it 4 weeks previously. It was also the 4th time a song that was enjoying its 6th week on the chart was the biggest climber. To date we had seen 2 songs manage this in their 7th week and 1 in its 9th week.

‘The Airplane Song’ was the other high flyer this week as it made a star rater climb of 5 places from 16 to 11.

The faller of the week was Peter Lotis’ ‘Walking In The Sunshine’ which was the 26th time a local song had taken this award. It dropped 6 from 10 to 16.

Sandie Shaw’s ‘Puppet On A String’ was the oldest for a 3rd week in a row. This was on 14 weeks in total.

2 songs left the charts this week, the first of which was The Happenings’ ‘I Got Rhythm’ which had been with us for just 2 weeks. It managed to get to 17 during its short run. This would be the group’s only SA Chart hit.

The other song to go was The Bee Gees’ version of ‘New York Mining Disaster 1941’. It had spent 7 weeks on the charts and peaked at 2. This was a far better performance than the cover version by The Staccatos which only managed 3 weeks and a peak of 18. In total the song spent 10 weeks in the charts for the 2 versions and this was the second lowest total for a song charting in more than 1 version. Only ‘Games That Lovers Play’, which had managed 5 weeks in total between the 2 versions by Eddie Fisher and Connie Francis, had a lower weeks count.

Petula Clark clocked up her 6th hit this week as ‘Don’t Sleep in the Subway’ entered the top 20 at 15. 5 other acts had reached the 6 week mark with only The Rolling Stones having had more as they had managed 7. Petula now led the way for female artists with Virginia Lee on 5 being second. ‘Don’t Sleep in the Subway’ was the 10th song by a solo UK woman and the 30th overall for a solo woman. This song was a 5th hit for songwriter Tony Hatch, 4 of which had been where Petula was the artist. Jackie Trent shared the song writing credits, but it was only her second hit in the song writer capacity. ‘Don’t Sleep in the Subway’ would top the charts in Australia and would go to 12 in the UK and 5 in the US. Petula became the 2nd woman to have 2 in the charts at the same time as ‘A Groovy Kind Of Love’ was still in the top 20. The only other woman to manage this so far was Connie Francis. Overall Petula was the 21st artist to have 2 or more in the chart at the same time.

The second new entry was ‘Groovin’’ by The Young Rascals. In total we would have 3 songs chart with ‘groove’ in the title, 3 with ‘groovy’. The Young Rascals’ hit was one of only 2 that would have ‘groovin’’ in the title, the other one was yet to come. ‘Groovin’’ would top the US charts for a total of 4 weeks in a run split into 2 sets of 2 weeks with Aretha Franklin’s ‘Respect’ spending 2 week at 1 in between those 2 runs. In the UK it made it to number 8. The song, which was written by Young Rascal band members Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati, has reached the UK and US charts a number of times via cover versions. In the UK Pato Baton went to 14 with it while War managed to get to 43 while in the US Booker T & The MGs took an instrumental version to 21, The Newbeats went to 82 and UB40 took a reggae version to 90.

Petula Clark’s 2 in the charts moved her into tied 8th place on the weeks count list as she had 43 to her name, a total she shared with Tommy Roe. Jim Reeves pulled 1 clear of Gene Rockwell to be in 12th spot on his own while Rockwell fell to 13th. Reeves was on 38 weeks now. The Square Set’s ‘Silence Is Golden’ was enjoying its 7th week on the chart and was their only hit to date. This meant that the band entered the top 20 of the local weeks count list, sharing 19th place with Tony Wells and The Boet van Wyk Orkes.

The most popular letter for an act’s name to begin with this week was ‘P’ as 5 of the songs in the top 20 had artists with names starting with that letter (Procol Harum, Petula Clark x 2, Peter Lotis and Pierre Barouh, the last named being one side of a duet). ‘N’, ‘S’ and ‘T’ had 3 each.

Youtube playlist: