6 May 1966

distant_drums_reeves

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 4 Distant Drums  - Jim Reeves
2 3 6 Barbara Ann  - Beach Boys
3 11 3 Die Gezoem van die Bye  - Des Lindberg
4 2 10 The Ballad of the Green Berets  - Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler
5 4 9 19th Nervous Breakdown  - Rolling Stones
6 5 9 To Whom it Concerns  - Chris Andrews
7 8 6 A Well Respected Man  - Kinks
8 6 10 These Boots are Made for Walking  - Nancy Sinatra
9 7 4 Flowers on the Wall  - Statler Brothers
10 9 12 The Sounds of Silence  - Simon & Garfunkel
11 12 3 Lies and Kisses  - Cliff Richard
12 17 3 Elusive Butterfly  - Judy Page
13 10 8 For You Babe  - June Muscat
14 New 1 Darling it’s Wonderful  - Virginia Lee
15 19 2 Elusive Butterfly  - Bob Lind
16 18 2 Don’t Push Me  - Hedgehoppers Anonymous
17 13 8 My Love  - Petula Clark
18 15 6 A Must to Avoid  - Herman’s Hermits
19 14 10 Yes Mr. Peters  - Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman
20 20 2 (You’re My) Soul and Inspiration  - Righteous Brothers

Jim Reeves’ ‘Distant Drums’ enjoyed a second week at the top of the charts and it looked like it had shaken off the challenge from The Rolling Stones’ ‘19th Nervous Breakdown’ which dropped from 2 to 5. The new contender for the top spot was either The Beach Boys’ ‘Barbara Ann’ (they had already topped the charts with their previous hit, ‘California Girls’) or Des Lindberg’s ‘Die Gezoem van die Bye’ which was our biggest climber for a second week running, following up last week’s 7 place jump with an 8 place climb this week. This would equal the second biggest climb in a week to date which 8 other songs had managed of which 2 had been by local artists (Murray Campbell’s ‘Goodbye My Love’ and Four Jacks & A Jills’ ‘Jimmy Come Lately’).

The 2 versions of ‘Elusive Butterfly’ by Judy Page and Bob Lind, would both be star raters this week with Page’s version moving up 5 to 12 and Lind’s climbing 4 to 15.

‘Yes Mr Peters’ by Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman was the biggest faller as it dropped a further 5 places from 14 to 19 to follow up its 4 place fall two weeks previously.

Group 66’s hit, ‘One By One’ left the top 20 this week. It had enjoyed 6 weeks on our charts and peaked at 11 during that time.  The band would soon be back in the top 20.

Virginia Lee became the first woman to chart with 3 hits as ‘Darling It’s Wonderful’ entered the top 20 at 14, the highest debut position to date for a song by a local woman. Her 2 previous hits had both been as part of a duet. The gap between this new entry and Virginia’s previous chart appearance was 24 weeks, making it the biggest to date for a local act, beating the 23 weeks that Emil Dean had had between his 2 hits, but falling a good few weeks short of the overall record to date of 36 weeks which Petula Clark experienced. This was, however, the second biggest gap to date for a female artist with the 3rd biggest being the comparatively small break from the charts of 9 weeks that Virginia had suffered between her first 2 hits. ‘Darling It’s Wonderful’ was originally recorded by The Lovers, a duo consisting of Allen Bunn, the song’s writer, and his wife Anna Sanford. It would make it to number 48 on the Billboard charts in the US in 1957. Bunn would pass away in August 1977.

Herman’s Hermits joined Gene Rockwell in 5th place on the list of weeks on the charts by an artist as they moved on to 31 weeks. Chris Andrews pulled 1 clear of Elvis to occupy 10th spot on his own with 24 weeks to his name while Virginia Lee moved into tied 15th place on 17 weeks, sharing that spot with The Bats, Manfred Mann, Rick Nelson and The Staccatos. Along with the 2 other local acts on 17 weeks (The Bats and The Staccatos in case you didn’t know) Virginia was tied 3rd highest for SA acts. June Muscat moved into 10th place on her own on the local acts list with her 8 weeks.

Youtube playlist:

29 April 1966

distant_drums_reeves

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 3 3 Distant Drums  - Jim Reeves
2 1 9 The Ballad of the Green Berets  - Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler
3 5 5 Barbara Ann  - Beach Boys
4 2 8 19th Nervous Breakdown  - Rolling Stones
5 4 8 To Whom it Concerns  - Chris Andrews
6 6 9 These Boots are Made for Walking  - Nancy Sinatra
7 12 3 Flowers on the Wall  - Statler Brothers
8 10 5 A Well Respected Man  - Kinks
9 7 11 The Sounds of Silence  - Simon & Garfunkel
10 8 7 For You Babe  - June Muscat
11 18 2 Die Gezoem van die Bye  - Des Lindberg
12 16 2 Lies and Kisses  - Cliff Richard
13 9 7 My Love  - Petula Clark
14 11 9 Yes Mr. Peters  - Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman
15 14 5 A Must to Avoid  - Herman’s Hermits
16 13 6 One by One  - Group 66
17 20 2 Elusive Butterfly  - Judy Page
18 New 1 Don’t Push Me  - Hedgehoppers Anonymous
19 New 1 Elusive Butterfly  - Bob Lind
20 New 1 (You’re My) Soul and Inspiration  - Righteous Brothers

As with our previous song to debut on the top 20 straight into the top 10, ‘Distant Drums’ by Jim Reeves took a record equalling 3 weeks to reach the top spot. It knocked Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler’s ‘The Ballad of the Green Berets’ into second place after the latter had spent 2 weeks at 1.

One of last week’s new entries, Des Lindberg’s ‘Die Gezoem van die Bye’ took biggest climber in the week award moving up 7 from 18 to 11. It was the 14th time a local act had taken this honour. Another of last week’s new entries, Cliff Richard’s ‘Lies And Kisses’ was a star rater moving up 4 to 12 and The Statler Brothers 5 place climb to 7 gave their hit ‘Flowers On The Wall’ a second week in a row with a star rater climb.

Petula Clark picked up a second biggest faller in the week award as her song ‘My Love’ fell 4 places to 13. Her previous time with this had been with ‘I Know A Place’.

Three songs departed from the top 20 this week and the first of these was ‘I’ve Got Everything You Need Babe’ by Gene Rockwell. It had spent 8 weeks on the charts but only peaked at 14, the lowest to date from his 4 hits. Gene would return to the charts at a later date.

The Overlanders’ ‘Michelle’ managed to get to number 4 during its 10 weeks on the chart, 3 weeks better and 7 places higher than the only other Beatles cover to chart to date, Matt Monro’s ‘Yesterday’. ‘Michelle’ would be The Overlanders only SA Char hit.

Last of the leavers was Chris Andrews’ ‘Yesterday Man’ which spent 4 of its 15 weeks in the chart at number 1. It also enjoyed the company of Andrews’ other hit ‘To Whom It Concerns’ for 7 of those 15 weeks. The departure of ‘Yesterday Man’ meant that we had a new oldest song on the chart and that was Simon & Garfunkel’s ‘The Sounds Of Silence’ which stood on 11 weeks.

The first of the new entries was by a band who at the time were UK based, but would settle in South Africa about 3 years later. Hedgehoppers Anonymous had had a number 5 hit in 1965 in the UK with the Jonathan King penned ‘It’s Good News Week’. This week it was good news for them as their song ‘Don’t Push Me’ (also penned by Jonathan King) entered the top 20 at 18. It was the 50th song to chart by a British act. When the band moved to SA, they dropped the ‘Anonymous’ from their name.

The second new entry was the 3rd song to have at least 2 different version chart s as the original ‘Elusive Butterfly’ by Bob Lind entered our charts a week after Judy Page’s version had. As mentioned in last week’s commentary, Lind’s version would give him a number 5 hit in both the UK and the US. It did, however, start life as the b-side to Lind’s ‘Cheryl’s Goin’ Home’, but the DJ’s of the time soon changed that. The string arrangement on this version was by Jack Nitzsche who would do a lot of work with Neil Young and the Rolling Stones.

The last new entry was ‘(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration’ by The Righteous Brothers. It had been 19 weeks since their only other hit to date, ‘Unchained Melody’, had left the charts and this was now the biggest gap between hits for an American act, overtaking the 6 week gap the Beach Boys had had which ended just 4 weeks previously. ‘(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration’ would top the charts in the US for 3 weeks after dislodging the song that was dislodged from number 1 on our charts this week. In the UK it would peak at 15. Bill Medley produced the track, their first release after leaving long-time producer, Phil Spector. The song was a second SA hit for song writer Barry Mann who had brought us The Staccatos ‘Come Back Silly Girl’ and the first of a number of hits Mann would have teamed up with Cynthia Weil.

Herman’s Hermits celebrated 30 weeks in the charts and moved into tied 6th place for total weeks on the charts by an artist. Chris Andrews moved into tied 10th place on that list alongside Elvis Presley with 23 weeks under his belt. June Muscat moved into tied 10th place on the list for local acts as her 7 to date equalled that managed by Tony Wells.

Youtube playlist:

22 April 1966

green_beret

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 8 The Ballad of the Green Berets  - Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler
2 2 7 19th Nervous Breakdown  - Rolling Stones
3 9 2 Distant Drums  - Jim Reeves
4 4 7 To Whom it Concerns  - Chris Andrews
5 10 4 Barbara Ann  - Beach Boys
6 3 8 These Boots are Made for Walking  - Nancy Sinatra
7 5 10 The Sounds of Silence  - Simon & Garfunkel
8 8 6 For You Babe  - June Muscat
9 6 6 My Love  - Petula Clark
10 12 4 A Well Respected Man  - Kinks
11 7 8 Yes Mr. Peters  - Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman
12 16 2 Flowers on the Wall  - Statler Brothers
13 11 5 One by One  - Group 66
14 14 4 A Must to Avoid  - Herman’s Hermits
15 13 15 Yesterday Man  - Chris Andrews
16 New 1 Lies and Kisses  - Cliff Richard
17 15 10 Michelle  - Overlanders
18 New 1 Die Gezoem van die Bye  - Des Lindberg
19 17 8 I’ve Got Everything You Need Babe  - Gene Rockwell
20 New 1 Elusive Butterfly  - Judy Page

Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler was holding his position at number 1 as ‘The Ballad of the Green Berets’ enjoyed a second week there, still keeping The Rolling Stones’ ‘19th Nervous Breakdown’, which spent a second week at 3, at bay.

Jim Reeves’ ‘Distant Drums’ came crashing into the charts at 9 last week and this week it was the biggest climber as moved up 6 to 3. Also moving up was The Beach Boys’ ‘Barbara Ann’ which bagged them a 3rd star rater performance (2 with ‘Barbara Ann’ and 1 with ‘California Girls’) as it moved up 5 from 10 to 5. Also enjoying star rater status was The Statler Brothers’ ‘Flowers On The Wall’ which climbed 4 from 16 to 12.

The duet between Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman, ‘Yes Mr. Peters’, was the faller of the week. It dropped 4 from 7 to 11.

Three songs left the top 20 this week, the first of which was The Turtles ‘Let Me Be’ which enjoyed an 11 week run and a peak of 6. They still had a few more hits to come.

The oldest song on last week’s chart, Cliff Richards’ ‘Wind Me Up Let Me Go’ followed the fate of The Beach Boys’ ‘California Girls’ and left the charts 1 week short of the 20 week milestone. We were yet to see a song mange to break through this barrier. Cliff’s hit peaked at 4 during its 19 week run. This was the best peak of his 3 hits to date.

Last to go was Four Jacks And A Jill’s ‘Jimmy Come Lately’ which peaked at 2 during its 12 week run on the charts. Like the Turtles and Cliff Richard, they also had more hits in the tank.

Cliff Richard’s ‘Wind Me Up Let Me Go’ handed over the oldest song on the chart baton to Chris Andrews’ ‘Yesterday Man’ which sat on 15 weeks. However, Cliff would not have been too upset as his ‘Lies And Kisses’ was one of the new entries this week. Interestingly the song was released on a 4 track EP called ‘Take Four’ in the UK and I have not been able to find a reference to the song being released as a single anywhere. Perhaps they chose to just list 1 track from the EP for the chart, or there was an actual single release in South Africa (anybody out there know?). The song would give Cliff his 4th chart hit in SA and put him tied second for number of hits, joining Gene Rockwell, Tom Jones and Herman’s Hermits on that total. They were all 1 short of The Rolling Stones’ 5. This new entry meant 2 things for Cliff, firstly he celebrated 20 consecutive weeks with at least 1 song in the top 20 (as mentioned above, the previous 19 were with ‘Wind Me Up Let Me Go’) and secondly, he became the 3rd act to replace themselves on the charts. Murray Campbell and Tom Jones were the previous 2 to have a new entry the same week as one of their songs left the charts.

The second new entry was by one half of a well-known South African couple. Des Lindberg (of Des & Dawn fame) entered at 18 with a take on ‘Big Rock Candy Mountain’. He provided us with some Afrikaans lyrics to the song and called it ‘Die Gezoem Van Die Bye’. Although it starts off in English the lyrics change into Afrikaans for the majority of the song, so I have regarded this as the first ever Afrikaans song to chart.

The last of the new entries was also by a local act and was the 4th by a local woman to chart. ‘Elusive Butterfly’ by Judy Page was a cover of a song by Bob Lind which had given Lind a number 5 peak on both sides of the Atlantic earlier in the year. Judy had released a number of duets with Peter Lotis (mostly before the chats started) and her daughter, Kim Kallie, would have a few hits under the name Margino.

Gene Rockwell shook off The Seekers to occupy 5th place on his own on the list of weeks on the chart by an artists. On 31 weeks, he was now just 2 behind the local leader Murray Campbell. Chris Andrews moved into 11th place on his own, leaving The Hollies and The Ivy League behind on 20 weeks as he jumped up to 22 weeks having 2 on the charts this week.

Youtube playlist:

15 April 1966

green_beret

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 2 7 The Ballad of the Green Berets  - Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler
2 5 6 19th Nervous Breakdown  - Rolling Stones
3 1 7 These Boots are Made for Walking  - Nancy Sinatra
4 4 6 To Whom it Concerns  - Chris Andrews
5 3 9 The Sounds of Silence  - Simon & Garfunkel
6 8 5 My Love  - Petula Clark
7 6 7 Yes Mr. Peters  - Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman
8 10 5 For You Babe  - June Muscat
9 New 1 Distant Drums  - Jim Reeves
10 17 3 Barbara Ann  - Beach Boys
11 13 4 One by One  - Group 66
12 19 3 A Well Respected Man  - Kinks
13 7 14 Yesterday Man  - Chris Andrews
14 15 3 A Must to Avoid  - Herman’s Hermits
15 9 9 Michelle  - Overlanders
16 New 1 Flowers on the Wall  - Statler Brothers
17 14 7 I’ve Got Everything You Need Babe  - Gene Rockwell
18 11 12 Jimmy Come Lately  - Four Jacks & a Jill
19 12 19 Wind Me Up, Let Me Go  - Cliff Richard
20 18 11 Let Me Be  - Turtles

After the Easter break, the charts were back and there was a new number one as Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler’s ‘The Ballad of the Green Berets’ emulated its US success by knocking Nancy Sinatra’s ‘These Boots Were Made For Walking’ off the top spot. Nancy’s hit dropped to 3 while The Rolling Stones moved into second place with ‘19th Nervous Breakdown’ and were looking set to make it 4 number 1’s out of 5 hits.

The 2 biggest climbers this week were The Beach Boys’ ‘Barbara Ann’ and The Kinks’ ‘A Well Respected Man’ which both moved up 7 to land at 10 and 12 respectively. Interestingly there were no other star raters with the next highest climb being the 3 places The Rolling Stones’ ‘19th Nervous Breakdown’ managed.

On the falling front it was also a 7 place move that took top honours and there were also 2 songs that managed this, the first being Cliff Richards’ ‘Wind Me Up Let Me Go’ which fell to 19 and the other was Four Jacks And A Jill’s ‘Jimmy Come Lately’ which fell to 18. Cliff would not have been too disappointed as his song, which was still the oldest on the charts, joined The Beach Boys’ ‘California Girls’ for the best run on the charts to date as it clocked up its 19th week in the top 20. The song had now also been the longest running oldest song on the chart since the last of those on the first ever chart left the top 20 as it had been the oldest for 7 weeks.

Last week’s number 20 song was no longer with us this week and that was The Animals’ ‘It’s My Life’ which had enjoyed a run of 9 weeks and peaked at 11 during that time. The band would return to our charts at a later date.

The Beatles’ ‘We Can Work It Out’ was the other song to leave the top 20 this week. It had lasted 14 weeks with a highest placing of 2. The peaks of their 3 hits to date read 2-1-2, so were they due a number 1 after this?

We had a new highest debut spot for a song as Jim Reeves’ ‘Distant Drums’ rocketed into the charts at number 9, 1 place higher than previous best for a new entry which Nancy Sinatra had managed when ‘These Boots are Made for Walking’ entered at 10 just 6 weeks previously.  ‘Distant Drums’ had originally been recorded by Roy Orbison in 1963 when he managed to have a number 3 hit with it in Australia. Reeves recorded a version which was meant to be for the song writer, Cindy Walker’s, private use and was not regarded as good enough for general release, but after his death in a plane crash on 31 July 1964 (aged 40), an orchestral backing was added to the original recording and released as a single. It went to the top of the US Country Charts and unusually for the UK where Country & Western music has never really been very popular, it topped the charts for 5 weeks.

Our other new entry this week was almost as successful on the US Country Singles charts as Reeves’ hit as it peaked at 2 there, however, The Statler Brothers’ ‘Flowers On The Wall’ fell way short of Reeves’ chart topping efforts in the UK as the songs only managed to get to number 38. On the main Billboard Hot 100, though, The Statler Brothers’ hit got to 4 while ‘Distant Drums’ only managed to get to 45. ‘Flowers On The Wall’ was also a number 2 hit in New Zealand and would be used in the soundtrack to Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 film ‘Pulp Fiction’. Only 2 members of The Statler Brothers were brothers (Don and Harold Reid) and the ‘Statler’ in their name came from a brand of tissues they saw in a hotel room when they felt it necessary to change their name from the Kingsmen following the success of ‘Louie Louie’ by a band of that name.

Gene Rockwell celebrated reaching the 30 weeks on the chart mark while Chris Andrews was enjoying his 20th. Rockwell moved into 5 place overall for weeks, joining The Seekers in that position while Andrews joined The Hollies and The Ivy League at 11 on that list.

Youtube playlist:

8 April 1966

Nancy-Sinatra_Boots-Walking

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 6 These Boots are Made for Walking  - Nancy Sinatra
2 2 6 The Ballad of the Green Berets  - Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler
3 3 8 The Sounds of Silence  - Simon & Garfunkel
4 4 5 To Whom it Concerns  - Chris Andrews
5 5 5 19th Nervous Breakdown  - Rolling Stones
6 6 6 Yes Mr. Peters  - Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman
7 7 13 Yesterday Man  - Chris Andrews
8 8 4 My Love  - Petula Clark
9 9 8 Michelle  - Overlanders
10 10 4 For You Babe  - June Muscat
11 11 11 Jimmy Come Lately  - Four Jacks & a Jill
12 12 18 Wind Me Up, Let Me Go  - Cliff Richard
13 13 3 One by One  - Group 66
14 14 6 I’ve Got Everything You Need Babe  - Gene Rockwell
15 15 2 A Must to Avoid  - Herman’s Hermits
16 16 14 We Can Work it Out  - Beatles
17 17 2 Barbara Ann  - Beach Boys
18 18 10 Let Me Be  - Turtles
19 19 2 A Well Respected Man  - Kinks
20 20 9 It’s My Life  - Animals

I am not sure if there was no chart this week or if they just re-ran the previous week’s chart as there was no movement on the top 20 this week. Either way, the lack of a new chart was due to this being the Easter weekend in 1966. There are two ways we can handle the statistics here. Either one ignores the week completely or one treats it as a normal chart, except that there is no movement. I have opted for the latter because it would be unfair on those songs which would have been on the chart for the 8 April had they had one as they (and their artists) would miss out on weeks and points to their name. I believe that this is less prejudicial than ignoring the week. Feel free to treat it how you wish, there is no right and wrong way.

On the basis I have chosen, Nancy Sinatra’s ‘These Boots are Made for Walking’ clocked up a 4th week at 1 and sat tied third with Chris Andrews’ ‘Yesterday Man’ for weeks at 1, 2 behind The Beach Boys’ ‘California Girls’ and Murray Campbell’s ‘Goodbye My Love’ which were both on 6.

Cliff Richard’s ‘Wind Me Up Let Me Go’ moved into second place on its own for most weeks on the chart by a song, pulling 1 clear of Rick Nelsons’ ‘I Need You’ and The Staccatos’ ‘Come Back Silly Girl’ and was just 1 behind ‘California Girls’ by The Beach Boys which led the way with 19. Cliff now sat equal with Elvis on 23 weeks on the chart and they shared 8th place on the weeks on the charts by an artist list.

Youtube playlist:

1 April 1966

Nancy-Sinatra_Boots-Walking

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 5 These Boots are Made for Walking  - Nancy Sinatra
2 3 5 The Ballad of the Green Berets  - Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler
3 2 7 The Sounds of Silence  - Simon & Garfunkel
4 5 4 To Whom it Concerns  - Chris Andrews
5 7 4 19th Nervous Breakdown  - Rolling Stones
6 8 5 Yes Mr. Peters  - Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman
7 4 12 Yesterday Man  - Chris Andrews
8 12 3 My Love  - Petula Clark
9 6 7 Michelle  - Overlanders
10 13 3 For You Babe  - June Muscat
11 9 10 Jimmy Come Lately  - Four Jacks & a Jill
12 10 17 Wind Me Up, Let Me Go  - Cliff Richard
13 17 2 One by One  - Group 66
14 14 5 I’ve Got Everything You Need Babe  - Gene Rockwell
15 New 1 A Must to Avoid  - Herman’s Hermits
16 11 13 We Can Work it Out  - Beatles
17 New 1 Barbara Ann  - Beach Boys
18 15 9 Let Me Be  - Turtles
19 New 1 A Well Respected Man  - Kinks
20 19 8 It’s My Life  - Animals

Nancy Sinatra’s ‘These Boots are Made for Walking’ spent a 3rd straight week at the top of the charts, keeping Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler’s ‘The Ballad of the Green Berets’ at bay as the latter moved up into second place, sending the previous number 1, Simon & Garfunkel’s ‘The Sounds Of Silence’ into 3rd place.

Last week’s biggest climber, Petula Clark’s ‘My Love’, managed to claim the title again with a 4 place climb from 12 to 8. This week it shared the title with Group 66’s ‘One by One’ which accounted for the 13th time a local song had been the biggest climber. ‘One by One’ moved up 4 from 17 to 13.

The Beatles experienced their 3rd biggest faller in a week as ‘We Can Work It Out’ fell 5 places from 11 to 16.

Both Ronnie Wilson and Tony Wells had been saying that they would step aside for a number of weeks now and this week they both finally did as their versions of the song ‘I’ll Step Aside’ were 2 of the 3 songs to leave the chart this week. Wilson’s version had managed 6 weeks and peaked at 16 while Wells was slightly more successful managing 7 weeks and a peak of 9, giving the song a total of 13 weeks and a highest position of 9. This fell way short of the 29 weeks the only other song to chart with different versions so far had managed, the other being ‘Goodbye My Love’ where Murray Campbell’s solo version had been the most successful, topping the chart for 6 weeks.

The other song to go was The Rolling Stones’ ‘Get Off Of My Cloud’ which got off of the charts. It had spent 15 weeks on the charts, 3 of which were at the top spot. To date, The Stones had had 5 songs chart, 3 of which had gone to number 1 and the 4th which was still in the top 20 (‘19th Nervous Breakdown’) and was heading towards the top moving up 2 to 5 this week. The departure of ‘Get Off My Cloud’ ended a run of 3 weeks where The Stones had 2 in the chart. They topped the list for total weeks with 2 in the top 20, having managed this 13 times, the next highest being 8 which Tom Jones and Herman’s Hermits had managed. The bad news for The Stones was that they would not manage to have 2 in the charts at the same time again. Chris Andrews who still had 2 in the charts this week was enjoying his 3rd week with 2.

And talking of Herman’s Hermits, they had the highest of the new entries this week as we ignored the advice on the record label of their single ‘A Must to Avoid’ and propelled it to number 15 on the charts. They joined Tom Jones and Gene Rockwell in second place on the list of number of hits by an artist as they now all had 4 to their name, 1 less than the 5 The Stones had clocked up. ‘A Must To Avoid’ was written by P.F. Sloan (who had brought us The Turtles ‘Let Me Be’) and Steve Barri and would go to number 6 in the UK and 8 in the US, their first single to have a higher peak in the UK than in the US since 5 hits previously when ‘Silhouettes’ went to 3 in the UK and 5 in the US (2 of those 5 hits only charted in the US). The song was produced by Mickie Most, a British born chap who had lived in South Africa for a while, having some success with his band Mickie Most & The Playboys.

The Beach Boys returned to the charts with their second hit ‘Barbara Ann’ which followed up the success of chart topper, ‘California Girls’ which departed from the chart just 6 weeks previously, but this was the biggest gap between hits to date for an American act. To date there were only 3 other US acts that had managed 2 hits (Elvis Presley, Sam The Sham & The Pharaohs and Glenn Yarbrough) all of which had ended up with 2 in the charts in the same week and none of which had gone on to have 3 hits yet. ‘Barbara Ann’ was a cover of 1961 hit by The Regents (#13 hit in the US) and would be The Beach Boys 23rd US Hot 100 hit where it would peak at number 2. In the UK it would manage a highest position of 3. It would top the chart in Austria, Germany, Norway and Switzerland.

The final new entry was The Kinks’ ‘A Well Respected Man’. It was the band’s 2nd song to chart in SA and as it had been 41 weeks since their previous hit, ‘Tired Of Waiting For You’, had last seen chart action this beat Petula Clark’s record of a 36 week gap between hits that she set up 2 weeks back. ‘A Well Respected Man’, written by Ray Davies, was not given a single release in the UK, but was included on the EP ‘Kwyet Kinks’. In the US, where it was released as a single, it would be their 6th song to chart on the Billboard Hot 100 and would peak at number 13 there. It would also chart in Holland and Belgium peaking at 6 and 20 respectively and was used as the theme tune to the UK comedy TV series ‘Mr. Sloane’ which starred Nick Frost.

‘Wind Me Up, Let Me Go’ by Cliff Richard moved on to 17 weeks and was still the oldest on the charts. The song sat tied second now for weeks on the chart by a song, joining Rick Nelsons’ ‘I Need You’ and The Staccatos’ ‘Come Back Silly Girl’ there and was 2 behind leader, ‘California Girls’ by The Beach Boys. The latter band with their new entry this week, moved on to 20 weeks in the charts and sat tied 10th overall for weeks on the charts by an artist. Chris Andrews moved into the top 20 of that list as his 16 weeks to date put him tied 18th. Four Jacks And A Jill clocked up their 10th week and now sat 8th on the list for local acts.

Youtube playlist:

26 March 1966

Nancy-Sinatra_Boots-Walking

Pos LW Weeks Song Artist
1 1 4 These Boots are Made for Walking  - Nancy Sinatra
2 2 6 The Sounds of Silence  - Simon & Garfunkel
3 5 4 The Ballad of the Green Berets  - Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler
4 3 11 Yesterday Man  - Chris Andrews
5 8 3 To Whom it Concerns  - Chris Andrews
6 4 6 Michelle  - Overlanders
7 10 3 19th Nervous Breakdown  - Rolling Stones
8 15 4 Yes Mr. Peters  - Steve Karliski and Mimi Roman
9 6 9 Jimmy Come Lately  - Four Jacks & a Jill
10 7 16 Wind Me Up, Let Me Go  - Cliff Richard
11 9 12 We Can Work it Out  - Beatles
12 20 2 My Love  - Petula Clark
13 19 2 For You Babe  - June Muscat
14 16 4 I’ve Got Everything You Need Babe  - Gene Rockwell
15 14 8 Let Me Be  - Turtles
16 11 15 Get Off My Cloud  - Rolling Stones
17 New 1 One by One  - Group 66
18 12 7 I’ll Step Aside  - Tony Wells
19 13 7 It’s My Life  - Animals
20 18 6 I’ll Step Aside  - Ronnie Wilson

Nancy Sinatra’s’ boots were still walking round the top spot in the charts as ‘These Boots are Made for Walking’ enjoyed a second week there. The previous number 1, Simon & Garfunkel’s ‘The Sounds of Silence’ was unmoved at 2.

Just last week we had the first occasion where an artist sat next themselves on the charts when The Rolling Stones occupied positions 10 and 11. This week we saw the second time an act sat in adjacent positions as Chris Andrews’ ‘To Whom It Concerns’ moved into 5thplace, 1 below his other hit in the charts, ‘Yesterday Man’.

Petula Clark’s ‘My Love’ clocked up the 4th biggest climber award for a female artist as it moved up 8 from 20 to 12 and in so doing equalled the biggest climb by a song by a woman to date which this week’s number 1 had managed 2 weeks previously. Sandi Shaw and Jackie Trent had brought us our other 2 biggest climbers in the week that were by solo female artists. ‘My Love’s fellow new entry last week, June Muscat’s ‘For You Babe’ and Steve Karliski & Mimi Roman’s ‘Yes Mr. Peters’ were also star raters with the latter climbing 7 to 8 while the latter moved up 6 to 13.

Tony Wells’ version of ‘I’ll Step Aside’ was the faller of the week dropping 6 places to 18. This was the 12th time the biggest faller had been by a local act. It was separated from the other version of the song (by Ronnie Wilson) by the other biggest faller of the week, The Animals’ ‘It’s My Life’, which sat at 19, while Wilson’s version was at 20.

Just 1 song left the charts this week and it was the one that had been the biggest faller in the previous 2 weeks. The leaver was Len Barry’s ‘1-2-3’ which had 6 weeks on the charts and peaked at 4. This would be the highest ever position attained by a song spending only 6 weeks on the charts, except for the song that would be at number 1 on the very last chart on February 1989 (which had spent 6 weeks in the top 20 up to the date of the last chart). ‘1-2-3’ would be Barry’s only SA chart hit.

The new entry this week was Group 66’s ‘One By One’.  The band was a local act comprising Peter Foyn, Carlos da Silva, Brian Mulder and Lou “Moose” Forer and shouldn’t be confused with a Swedish band of the same name. The song was written by and American singer/song writer Art Mann who would record his own version which would appear on the b-side of his 1969 single ‘Come Live With Me’.

The oldest song on the chart was Cliff Richard’s ‘Wind Me Up, Let Me Go’ which moved on to 16 weeks. The Beatles shook off Murray Campbell to claim 3rd place on the list of week on the charts as they moved on to 34 weeks while Cliff Richard moved into 9th place, going one ahead of The Fortunes and The Hollies with his 21 to date.

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